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What maps/atlas you use for lunar observation?

moon observing
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#1 zirkel 2

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 10:46 AM

Hi alls,

 

What maps/atlas you use for lunar observation? which are the most practical for you?

 

In my case i use :

 

  • Lunar Aeronautical Chart Series (NASA), right and below
  • "Atlas de la Lune" (Moon Atlas) de Gründ, left
  • Manuel d'observation Lunaire (Manual of Lunar observation) de Norma/Coute/Heully, middle

 

e13b.jpg


Edited by zirkel 2, 08 September 2020 - 10:48 AM.

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#2 Alex65

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 11:29 AM

My needs are basic as I only have a small 4" reflector and thus I can't see the finer detail anyhow. I use these vintage books when I'm planning for my lunar observing or for identifying objects that I see:

 

1) Survey of the Moon (1963) Patrick Moore - basic sectional lunar map but good descriptions provided.

 

2) Amateur Astronomer's Photographic Lunar Atlas (1968) H. Hatfield - not as sharp or comprehensive as a modern atlas but it still does the job for me.

 

3) A Concise Guide in Colour of the Moon (1978) Antonin Rukl - greater detailed maps of the lunar landscape.

 

4)The Moon: An observing guide for backyard telescopes (1992) Michael T. Kitt - not an atlas but a valuable source for when I'm planning my lunar observing sessions.

 

 

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#3 Cames

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 11:46 AM

I use a digital format atlas on a Windows tablet.

 

Virtual Moon Atlas (link)

 

It works for me because the continually changing illumination of the lunar surface alters the appearance of lunar features so dramatically.  Paper atlases had been disappointing for me before I adopted the VMA.  The onscreen lunar replica will zoom nicely.  The terminator is accurately drawn to my local time.  It will invert and swap left and right so that the lunar image matches surprisingly closely what appears in my eyepiece field of view.  Will display lots of associated details for the lunar features.  And has a searchable database for lunar objects.

---------------

C


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#4 MarkGregory

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 12:01 PM

I use an Apple app on my iPad most of the time now. It is called Moon Globe HD. You see the Moon as it appears from your location through a telescope. Terrain and features are labeled and you can touch on any label for more information. Nice high def images. You can also put the app in "Night Vision" mode where it is toned down and labels are red. Really sweet program.

 

 

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#5 zirkel 2

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 12:14 PM

My needs are basic as I only have a small 4" reflector and thus I can't see the finer detail anyhow.
It works for me because the continually changing illumination of the lunar surface alters the appearance of lunar features so dramatically.

 

With my 4" refractors many details are affordable, the number 1 problem is turbulence not diameter (even if it remains important).

 

 

I understand and i use Virtual Moon Atlas anytime also smile.gif

For my lunar observations taking into account the changing illumination, i use the "colongitude" parameter and "DatLun" with Virtual Moon Atlas.


Edited by zirkel 2, 08 September 2020 - 12:18 PM.


#6 Greyhaven

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 04:32 PM

At the scope the VLA.Rukl's is my hard copy atlas for answering questions and comparing my photographs to.

Grey



#7 Oscar56

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 03:54 PM

Apps for iOS :

- moonGlobeHD, very flexible. Can show Only what you see today or Tour the moon to any site

- MoonCalendar, a reference that shows an overview image of The moon for the whole month, on the 2nd page shows the alt and azimuth for the moon for any time of the day

- MoonMaps,  provides snapshots of the terminator for each lunar day

 

 

Hardcover:

 

- Rukl

- atlas of the Moon, Charles Woods

- paper copies of MoonMaps


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#8 mortarman

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 06:03 PM

Hi alls,

 

What maps/atlas you use for lunar observation? which are the most practical for you?

 

In my case i use :

 

  • Lunar Aeronautical Chart Series (NASA), right and below
  • "Atlas de la Lune" (Moon Atlas) de Gründ, left
  • Manuel d'observation Lunaire (Manual of Lunar observation) de Norma/Coute/Heully, middle

 

e13b.jpg

Where did you find the Lunar Aeronautical Chart Series?  I'd love to find a copy!



#9 BFaucett

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 07:34 PM

Hi alls,

 

What maps/atlas you use for lunar observation? which are the most practical for you?  ...

 

For an online map/atlas, I like to use the LROC Quickmap from Arizona State University.

 

The map: https://quickmap.lroc.asu.edu/

 

User guide: https://docs.quickmap.io/

 

 

To display the names/labels, turn on Nomenclature found under Overlays.

 

 

 

Also see: https://www.lroc.asu.edu/

 

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif



#10 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 08:28 PM

I have a copy of the Atlas of the Moon by Antonin Rukl and the Sky & Telescope's Moon Map.  I also use the Virtual Moon Atlas, the LROC Quickmap, and a couple of smart phone apps.


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#11 zirkel 2

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 04:51 AM

Where did you find the Lunar Aeronautical Chart Series?  I'd love to find a copy!

 

Here : https://www.lpi.usra...mapcatalog/LAC/


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#12 mortarman

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 08:06 AM

zirkel 2, I thought they would be books available. Did you print each page yourself? They don't seem to have an option to order anything.



#13 zirkel 2

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 11:53 AM

Not!

an French amateur astronomer prints and sells them...

other solution for you :

Each page yourself... print A3 format on glossy paper.

Edited by zirkel 2, 10 September 2020 - 11:58 AM.


#14 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 02:10 PM

The lunar charts in A Peterson Field Guide to Stars and Planets (Peterson Field Guides) aren't all that bad as a desk reference.



#15 dr.planet

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 03:56 PM

There's a LAC layer available for the new version of the Virtual Moon Atlas too.



#16 Andrekp

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 04:29 PM

The old Hatfield.  It matches the double flip of the Newtonian I use for lunar viewing.



#17 John Rogers

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Posted 13 September 2020 - 11:25 AM

I use the NASA Science Visualization Tool: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4768

 

You can set the time to that of your observation, to get the proper terminator and shadows, and then download a high resolution TIFF photo for reference


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#18 zirkel 2

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 11:35 AM

I use the NASA Science Visualization Tool: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4768

 

Thank you, great ressource ! waytogo.gif


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#19 Marvin452

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 08:14 AM

I use the NASA Science Visualization Tool: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4768

 

You can set the time to that of your observation, to get the proper terminator and shadows, and then download a high resolution TIFF photo for reference

I also thank you!



#20 mikerepp

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Posted 17 September 2020 - 02:05 PM

I use S&T Moon map, Crater of the Near Side, (love that book), and John's other book Features of the near side (sorry I know that's not the correct title but I'm at work and I'm tired)!  I also will consult a Moon globe in the astronomy room (spare bedroom).  I did start doing something quite different.  I 3d printed out craters of the Moon from NASA/thingverse.  These are great at the scope, I can use a light source to simulate different lighting of the crater.   The 3d model allows you to physically have that crater in your hand and then compare that to the view in the scope.  Highly recommend it to anyone that has a 3d printer and loves observing the Moon.  Hope the smoky skies clear soon.


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#21 ed_turco

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Posted 18 September 2020 - 10:47 AM

In years past, when I was able to observe, I'd used laminated xerox pages from the Rukl book.   For me, it was head and shoulders above the rest.

 

Now that I am cripled and housebound by RA, I can read Rukl's work and remember happier times.

 

 

Cloudy Nights Article: May, 2015

"The Definitive Newtonian Reflector."
A discussion of the age-old question "Are Apos really better than Newtonian reflectors?" Not!

http://www.cloudynig...reflector-r2983

Sky and Telescope articles:

"Making an Aplanatic Telescope." Nov. 1979: 473-7.
"Tripods from Crutches." Jan. 1996: 31.
"A Scavenger's 12-Inch Telescope". Apr. 1998: 96-97.


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#22 munirocks

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Posted 19 September 2020 - 07:04 AM

In years past, when I was able to observe, I'd used laminated xerox pages from the Rukl book.   For me, it was head and shoulders above the rest.

 

Now that I am cripled and housebound by RA, I can read Rukl's work and remember happier times.

 

 

Cloudy Nights Article: May, 2015

"The Definitive Newtonian Reflector."
A discussion of the age-old question "Are Apos really better than Newtonian reflectors?" Not!

http://www.cloudynig...reflector-r2983

Sky and Telescope articles:

"Making an Aplanatic Telescope." Nov. 1979: 473-7.
"Tripods from Crutches." Jan. 1996: 31.
"A Scavenger's 12-Inch Telescope". Apr. 1998: 96-97.

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