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Platesolve an astroid/Comet HELP

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#1 Calzunen

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 09:45 AM

Does anyone know how to platesolve this comet/astroid?
I captured it 2020-09-18 between 21.00 - 01.00 (eu time)

 

https://imgur.com/gallery/9yZngmj



#2 StarmanDan

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 10:16 AM

Upload the image to nova.astrometey.net.

#3 Alex McConahay

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 10:26 AM

One cannot plate solve an asteroid. One can only “solve” a “plate.” That is, the result of a plate solve will tell you only where the image is centered in space and it’s rotation.

If that is what you want to know, upload it as described.

Did you want to know more?

Like the identification of the asteroid?
The precise position of the asteroid on the image?

Then platesolving the image is only a first step.

Alex

#4 Dan Crowson

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 10:44 AM

Just looking at the picture, I would guess that this is asteroid 42685 1998 JY at around magnitude 16 or slightly brighter. There are quite a few more in the area but I doubt your exposures are deep enough for the others.
 
Dan


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#5 Calzunen

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 10:45 AM

When where these images taken?

2020-09-18 between 21.00 - 01.00 (eu time) I live in Sweden



#6 Calzunen

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 10:46 AM

Just looking at the picture, I would guess that this is asteroid 42685 1998 JY at around magnitude 16 or slightly brighter. There are quite a few more in the area but I doubt your exposures are deep enough for the others.
 
Dan

How do you know that?



#7 Calzunen

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 10:50 AM

Just looking at the picture, I would guess that this is asteroid 42685 1998 JY at around magnitude 16 or slightly brighter. There are quite a few more in the area but I doubt your exposures are deep enough for the others.
 
Dan

http://nova.astromet...8462#extraction It doesnt show the comet



#8 Galaxyhunter

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 11:05 AM

Just looking at the picture, I would guess that this is asteroid 42685 1998 JY at around magnitude 16 or slightly brighter. There are quite a few more in the area but I doubt your exposures are deep enough for the others.
 
Dan

Yes, I do agree.   There also is a 17.9 mag  (1998 MR13) asteroid 4.6' (PA194.8°)  South of the one that is shown. But I can not see that one in your images.  To go deep as far as capturing Asteroids, you need aperture & a lot of it. 



#9 Dan Crowson

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 11:42 PM

http://nova.astromet...8462#extraction It doesnt show the comet


Nova only shows very common objects and no asteroids or comets. I would typically just use my planetarium program (TheSkyX) with the full asteroid database and look at the field of view or I would plate-solve and load the image into Astrometrica. Not wanting to enter information, I just did the stare and compare. There are a lot of ways to do this but I didn't want to go further in B&IM.
 
This is a good catch. Mag 16 moving objects are a challenge.

Dan




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