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Mars observation-interpretation

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#1 k.s.min

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 10:25 PM

Continuous  2nights  were  very  clear  though  with  mediocre  seeing.

Upper  atmosphre  was  unstabe  maybe   by  jet  stream ......for  2  hour  observation   there  was  only  5-10  minutes  good  seeing. 

 

l  saw  Mars  was  approaching  to  a  very  dim  fixed  star (limiting  mag  of  my  13")

lf  that was  a  fixed  star  l  could  find  Mars  revolution  speed.

Mars   went  its  2  diameter   for  2h 15 mins. 

so,  v =  12000km  /  8100 sec  ....=  1.48  km / sec

(  as  Mars-star  position  was  tilted  40*  ,  apply  sin  value,.....then  v =   ca  2km/sec

This   value  is  far  from   paper  value.

 

So,  l  think  the  fixed  star  was  not  a  fixed  star......  something  other...!!...(  moon  Phobos? )

 

To  observe  the  position  change-move  of  SPC & environ  we  could  inspect  the  Martian  libration  movement...maybe,

 

==============================================

 

2222크기변환_20200921_105713.jpg 2222크기변환_20200921_105623.jpg 2222크기변환_20200921_105649.jpg


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#2 Redbetter

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 12:14 AM

Hi, nice sketch!

 

It is hard to simulate the Moons and star field without knowing your approximate location (longitude) and whether the time is U.T. or local.   Probably best to run it through Stellarium for the time period.  I see a 10.6 mag star in the mix at about the time I think you are talking about based on 9/21 international date line and corresponding UTC time with Syrtis Major and Hellas on the central meridian.  But I am not sure of the image orientation (scope/mount eyepiece view configuration) or time so I could be completely off.  



#3 Rutilus

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 03:15 AM

An excellent sketch. Regarding Phobos, I read an article from last month that gives  Phobos  a 

maximum elongation from Mars as being 30 arc seconds and Deimos at around 77.


Edited by Rutilus, 21 September 2020 - 03:18 AM.


#4 stanislas-jean

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 03:40 AM

Taking Coelix on reference on 21st Deimos was at west of planet approaching the planet center at 4H00UT around.

Phobos at east the same.

So this is probably something else (Deimos is at max elongation at 3.5 dia mars disk).

Anyway a good report.

Stanislas-Jean



#5 k.s.min

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 05:00 AM

Hi, nice sketch!

 

It is hard to simulate the Moons and star field without knowing your approximate location (longitude) and whether the time is U.T. or local.   Probably best to run it through Stellarium for the time period.  I see a 10.6 mag star in the mix at about the time I think you are talking about based on 9/21 international date line and corresponding UTC time with Syrtis Major and Hellas on the central meridian.  But I am not sure of the image orientation (scope/mount eyepiece view configuration) or time so I could be completely off.  

OK,....yes,  for  the  reference,

my  Local (127,135 E)  time  =  UT + 9 h...........so, UT = L  - 9h

then  my  local  UT  was    2: 00 (9/21) ---->  17 h  00 m  (9/20) 

.................................and,   4 : 15 (9/21)----->  19 h 15 m ( 9/20) 

 

My  sketch  shows  North -south  is  right....but  east- west  is  reverse  (mirror  image).                                          


Edited by k.s.min, 21 September 2020 - 05:04 AM.


#6 k.s.min

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 05:51 AM

Thanks  for  the  comments.

l  saw  another  ....  ,  on  9/20  ,   a  strange  twinkling  dim  star  suddenly  appeared   and  went  straightly   away   from  the  Mars  west  side......as  the  drawing.

 

Visual  mag  was  same  as  Titan  the  moon  of  Saturn....and    twinkle  interval  was  3 second  ..... regularly  twinkled  with  a  continuous  speed.....

But  l  thought  it  was  not  a  high  fling  airplane  (or  a  satelite)  

because   for  5~7  minutes  gazing  it,   it  turned    its  direction  in  reverse   twice  times. 

 

Mysterious  object.

 ============================================

 

2222크기변환_20200921_192813.jpg


Edited by k.s.min, 21 September 2020 - 05:55 AM.

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#7 k.s.min

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 06:08 AM

The  speed  of  turning  its  direction,   l  remember ,   was  instant  &  effortless.

 

l  can't  remember  the  event  time  .....maybe  2/3  point  of  the  Mars  session  on  9/20.   



#8 Quinnipiac Monster

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 06:09 AM

Great sketches, they seem to come from another era. I especially love your rendering of the closing gap between the polar cap and the limb.



#9 Redbetter

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 06:18 AM

Thanks for the position.

 

Checking the simulation in Stellarium, what you were seeing in the original post was the star I mentioned, about 10.6 mag.    Deimos would have been about 11.8 mag to the WSW of Mars and forming a roughly equilateral triangle with the star and Mars at your 4:15 local.  

 

Phobos is in very close to the planet, even at greatest elongation.  It is very sensitive to seeing.  Tonight I was able to catch Phobos and Deimos simultaneously in the 20" in my backyard with fair seeing for the 20" but unusually good for my backyard.  Phobos only reached about 19 arc seconds distance from the edge of Mars.  Deimos was several times more distant and roughly in line with that 10.6 mag star on the trailing side of the planet.   Deimos was not too difficult and could be easily held once found, but Phobos took some searching.  

 

After a few false glints that I could not confirm, and some failure with an occulting bar at 338x, I used a 3-6mm TV zoom at the 5mm setting (for 500x), to move Mars just out of the field and hold it there just eclipsed by the field stop.  I finally searched the diffraction ray in the lower right quadrant and found Phobos just inside the upper portion of this ray.  I could hold it and Deimos at the same time.  


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#10 k.s.min

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 06:24 AM

Great sketches, they seem to come from another era. I especially love your rendering of the closing gap between the polar cap and the limb.

For  my  recent  findings   (  for  Saturn,  Mars....and  Jupiter)  are  new  &  sudden,unexpected   without   time-confirmations.

but  l  do  not  draw  what  l  did  not  see...l  draw  what  l  saw.

For  more  cofirmation  l  need  better  seeing  or  bigger  instrument  ,also   experience    time  of  decade(s).......though  my  current  13"  refractor   is  powerful  as  a  discovering  machine.



#11 niteskystargazer

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 10:34 AM

K.S.

 

Very good sketch of Mars observation-interpretation smile.gif .

 

CS,KLU,

 

thanx.gif ,

 

Tom




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