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Ikey Seki 1965 with vintage 120 camera

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#1 Marty0750

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 11:40 PM

My first ever comet photo in my early days of astro photography back in the mid 1960's. A handed down Dacora 120 film camera captured this 10 minute (fixed mounted) time exposure of the Great Comet Ikeya Seki from South Australia on 30 October 1965, 3:45am (according to my log book).

 

All I have remaining is this fading contact print processed in my makeshift laundry darkroom at our family home back then. Film was Kodak Verichrome PAN 125 ASA ("chrome" but actually B&W panchromatic film). Developed in Kodak MQ developer.

 

Scanned and improved with judicious enhancement and colorization. The star trails are Corvus.

 

Ikey-Seki processed collage-2.jpg

 

 

The humble Dacora 120 camera with a Subita f5.6 / 75mm Anastigmat lens (Cooke triplet)

 

Dacora-web.jpg

 

 

Martin


Edited by Marty0750, 21 September 2020 - 12:01 AM.

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#2 DLuders

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 02:33 AM

Nice!  I missed that comet, since I was only 8 years old at the time, and not yet into the Astronomy hobby.   gramps.gif



#3 BrooksObs

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Posted 21 September 2020 - 01:33 PM

I recall Comet Ikeya-Seki well. After Hyakutake it was the most impressive comet I've seen among the 300 or so I've observed since 1957. It had the highest surface brightness tail that I've ever seen on any comet. Little wonder that there are so many impressive photos of it, like yours Martin, still circulating even though recorded using very basic photographic gear. It helped, as well that, at least early during its post-perihelion period, that both the ion and dust tails were aligned parallel with the celestial equator and so drifted due west during exposures with stationary cameras avoiding blurring.

 

BrooksObs



#4 chrysalis

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Posted 22 September 2020 - 03:43 AM

This could have been my very first comet had I been aware of it. I attribute that to poor mass medium communications or maybe I was just oblivious to the messages. I'd've been 11 or so, so I'm going with the latter ;) postulate.

 

I was not fated to observe a comet until 1970 and Comet Bennett.



#5 Marty0750

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Posted 22 September 2020 - 06:54 PM

I recall Comet Ikeya-Seki well. After Hyakutake it was the most impressive comet I've seen among the 300 or so I've observed since 1957. It had the highest surface brightness tail that I've ever seen on any comet. Little wonder that there are so many impressive photos of it, like yours Martin, still circulating even though recorded using very basic photographic gear. It helped, as well that, at least early during its post-perihelion period, that both the ion and dust tails were aligned parallel with the celestial equator and so drifted due west during exposures with stationary cameras avoiding blurring.

 

BrooksObs

 

 

 

 

Yes I noted the alignment with RA motion back then avoiding the smear. I have since reacquired a Dacora 120  (~$20 from eBay) and giving it a run for old times sake. Note the comet photo there are no street lights on. The city of Adelaide  (pop ~700,000 back then) turned off all streets lights every night at 1 am until 1971. Great for us star gazers with rural quality dark skies from our back yards every clear moonless night after 1am! There were general no complaints. There did not seem to be any special crime problem. But the utility had to keep shoveling the coal into the boilers regardless because they needed a ready supply of power when the city awoke in the morning. In order to "make use" of the "wasted" power generation the utility offered the city low tariffs if the lights were kept on all night. Then it was all over. Adelaide's light all-night pollution escalated systematically since then.

 

Martin


Edited by Marty0750, 23 September 2020 - 05:27 AM.


#6 PXR-5

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Posted 02 October 2020 - 05:45 PM

Nice capture 👍


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