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My HEQ5 Pro polar reticle came upside down...

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#1 awong101

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 07:26 PM

Huh? Has this happened to anyone else?

 

My "nearly new" came with an upside down polar reticle. (I am positive this is no fault to the previous owner. There's barely any use on the mount)

 

Is this just the norm with HEQ5 Pro, or am I just this lucky? I took it apart and re-oriented it properly. I can't imagine I'm supposed to polar align with this thing upside down... (Sorry for the crappy photos, kind of hard to take pictures through a scope)

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20200927_164539-SM.jpg
  • 20200927_170113-SM.jpg


#2 wrnchhead

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 07:37 PM

You're supposed to rotate the RA axis to align the scope. Be sure to verify it's alignment with the axis now that it's been moved. 


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#3 awong101

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 07:39 PM

You're supposed to rotate the RA axis to align the scope. Be sure to verify it's alignment with the axis now that it's been moved. 

Yep, last night was my first attempt with the mount and in order to match Sky-Watcher's own polar app and every other polar finder app. My counterweight was point up at the sky (telescope would be down at the ground), which really doesn't seem right.

 

I aligned it so its "home" position, 6 o'clock is down at the ground.

 

The picture below is the position where "6 o'clock" would be pointed at the ground, because the polar reticle was upside down, which just doesn't look right at all...

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20200927_174449-SM.jpg

Edited by awong101, 27 September 2020 - 07:49 PM.


#4 awong101

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 08:27 PM

I took out the glass with the reticle on it, and rotated back to its proper orientation. 



#5 GalaxyPiper

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 08:29 PM

The polar scope itself moves independently of the Mount. it rotates by itself. Because the sky rotates, it is not necessary to follow with the whole mount when setting up alignment.

Then when you finish with the alignment, you can then swing the mount to see if the pole has been aligned. But make sure you don't have a telescope mounted yet when you do this swing.


Edited by GalaxyPiper, 27 September 2020 - 08:34 PM.

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#6 lakeorion

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 08:43 PM

I had a similar issue with an iOptron polar scope.  That and I hated using it so much (short tripod / crawling on ground) I went to Sharpcap polar align and don't have a polar scope at all on my new mount.  It also digs me that it's often an extra cost 'option.'



#7 KTAZ

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 08:48 PM

I took out the glass with the reticle on it, and rotated back to its proper orientation. 

‘Atta boy!

 

Thats what I did also. Was going to send you a step by step procedure if you needed it.

 

I know, I know, it doesn’t really HAVE to be done...but I am a bit OCD! lol.gif


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#8 awong101

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 08:54 PM

Thanks everyone.

 

I wonder why it left the factory upside down? I mean, it was perfectly aligned upside down, so if it was a "mistake", someone had to intentionally install it upside down...

 

Even if the mount was meant for Southern Hemisphere market, it still wouldn't make sense, haha.


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#9 YAOG

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 09:59 PM

LOL! You didn't need to touch it, the polar scope rotates to match the night sky! there is no reason to change it at all, just loosen the thumb screw to let it turn. The whole idea is to rotate it to approximate the position of the prominent constellations on the reticle and then using the AZ and ALT knobs match Polaris in the circle and the secondary alignment stars to zero in on correct polar alignment. But before you do any of this you MUST align the reticle so as the RA is rotated the reticle stays centered. Then you need to learn to use the circular calculator built into the HEQ5 mount for the polar scope which will place the reticle in the correct position for you to do the actual PA. These are very good polar scopes and the calculator is key to finding the correct hour angle for the reticle.    


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#10 awong101

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:06 AM

LOL! You didn't need to touch it, the polar scope rotates to match the night sky! there is no reason to change it at all, just loosen the thumb screw to let it turn. The whole idea is to rotate it to approximate the position of the prominent constellations on the reticle and then using the AZ and ALT knobs match Polaris in the circle and the secondary alignment stars to zero in on correct polar alignment. But before you do any of this you MUST align the reticle so as the RA is rotated the reticle stays centered. Then you need to learn to use the circular calculator built into the HEQ5 mount for the polar scope which will place the reticle in the correct position for you to do the actual PA. These are very good polar scopes and the calculator is key to finding the correct hour angle for the reticle.    

I'm coming from the Star Adventurer Pro, and I'm used to the reticle with 6 o'clock pointed at the ground to match what is displayed in the polar finder apps.

 

94% moon out right now so it's kind of pointless to shoot. But it's giving me an opportunity to try out my (new to me) HEQ5-Pro and also (new to me) Optolong L-nHance. So far, polar alignment is going well and it's tracking well. L-nHance filter does a great job at blocking out a lot of that moonlight as well.


Edited by awong101, 28 September 2020 - 12:54 AM.

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#11 GalaxyPiper

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 02:23 PM

Here is another Cloudy Nights thread on aligning the HEQ5 mount:

 

https://www.cloudyni...#entry10541268 



#12 awong101

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 02:37 PM

Here is another Cloudy Nights thread on aligning the HEQ5 mount:

 

https://www.cloudyni...#entry10541268 

Thanks, yeah I saw that! But looks like those people didn't have the upside-down reticle issue?


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#13 StarmanDan

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 10:09 PM

No need to rotate the reticule. It will just be "upside down" again in six months. The orientation of the reticule with respect to the mount is irrelevant as you simply rotate the RA axis to match the star patterns or hour angle of the polar scope.

Edited by StarmanDan, 28 September 2020 - 10:09 PM.

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#14 YAOG

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:49 PM

No need to rotate the reticule. It will just be "upside down" again in six months. The orientation of the reticule with respect to the mount is irrelevant as you simply rotate the RA axis to match the star patterns or hour angle of the polar scope.

Exactly. If you do not use the calculator scale and hour indicators to position the reticle correctly the polar alignment will be way off. 

 

If you don't understand how to set the reticle to the correct hour and date using the calculator scales on the back of the HEQ5 and polar scope shield you may be better off just putting Polaris in the cross hairs and calling it a day. This should be close enough for casual visual work but the mount GOTO computer will need to synced to compensate for the misalignment. 


Edited by YAOG, 28 September 2020 - 11:53 PM.


#15 YAOG

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 11:37 AM

Seems to me having the reticle oriented that way is on purpose.

 

Set RA so alignment circle is oriented like a clock in the view finder (6@6). Set HA and look through the alignment scope while rotating the RA back to "vertical". If Polaris moves out of the alignment circle your not aligned and/or balanced correctly.
Its also why you set your alignment with everything loaded on your mount.

I believe mounts require DEC axis to be pointed east west to see through the polar alignment scope so you don't smack your equipment against the tripod when rotating through RA during PA.

Obviously this only applies to mounts which PA this way.

 

 

These are my observations learning to PA an HEQ5.

More than willing to understand better if anyone has advice.

I hate to ask the obvious but what are you talking about? This is the new reticle, did you read before talking? Have you even ever used a polar scope before?



#16 charlieb123

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 05:28 PM

I hate to ask the obvious but what are you talking about? This is the new reticle, did you read before talking? Have you even ever used a polar scope before?

Whats with the attitude?

How is the "new reticile" any different from the reticile on my HEQ5-Pro?

 

As I stated "More than willing to understand better if anyone has advice."

 

and yes, since you asked I have PA my mount.

 

L_5976_ISO800_120s__58F.jpg

 

Not perfect but not bad for 2 minutes unguided.



#17 YAOG

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 07:51 PM

Whats with the attitude?

How is the "new reticile" any different from the reticile on my HEQ5-Pro?

 

As I stated "More than willing to understand better if anyone has advice."

 

and yes, since you asked I have PA my mount.

 

attachicon.gifL_5976_ISO800_120s__58F.jpg

 

Not perfect but not bad for 2 minutes unguided.

 

Does your reticle look like the one in the first post? 



#18 awong101

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 08:17 PM

Well, so since rotating the reticle back to an up-right orientation. It helps me polar align much easier because if I look at it, it just reads "correctly". Sorry, but looking through a reticle, or anything with upside down and inversed markings just didn't make a whole lot sense.

 

Here's an example of a sub of North America that I took under the bright moon, with the Optolong L-nHance filter through my WO Spacecat 51, 2minutes and 30 seconds, unguided. I wanted to check my system under the bright moon because if nothing works, I haven't wasted a night, not if the moon is out.

 

Anyways, here's one of my subs at 2 minutes and 30 seconds long, unguided. Maybe I didn't have to mess with the reticle, who knows, but I just felt uneasy reading anything that is upside down and inversed.

 

I don't think what I did with the reticle was absolutely crucial. Since it's not connected to anything in the mount and it's only there as a guide. More importantly, whether the reticle is right-side up or upside-down, it doesn't change where Polaris needs to be relative to where I position the mount. However, Sky-Watcher's polar alignment app has the reticle with the "6" pointed down, so do other polar alignment apps. So I will orient my reticle according to the the polar alignment apps that I use.

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  • NA L-nHance moonlit 150s.jpg

Edited by awong101, 29 September 2020 - 08:48 PM.


#19 YAOG

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 01:53 PM

Well, so since rotating the reticle back to an up-right orientation. It helps me polar align much easier because if I look at it, it just reads "correctly". Sorry, but looking through a reticle, or anything with upside down and inversed markings just didn't make a whole lot sense.

 

Here's an example of a sub of North America that I took under the bright moon, with the Optolong L-nHance filter through my WO Spacecat 51, 2minutes and 30 seconds, unguided. I wanted to check my system under the bright moon because if nothing works, I haven't wasted a night, not if the moon is out.

 

Anyways, here's one of my subs at 2 minutes and 30 seconds long, unguided. Maybe I didn't have to mess with the reticle, who knows, but I just felt uneasy reading anything that is upside down and inversed.

 

I don't think what I did with the reticle was absolutely crucial. Since it's not connected to anything in the mount and it's only there as a guide. More importantly, whether the reticle is right-side up or upside-down, it doesn't change where Polaris needs to be relative to where I position the mount. However, Sky-Watcher's polar alignment app has the reticle with the "6" pointed down, so do other polar alignment apps. So I will orient my reticle according to the the polar alignment apps that I use.

All you had to do was to rotate the polar scope itself. There should be threads and a jam nut/ring to set the position as you did. I guess all is good now though. It is the hour angle gradations and the circular line that matters, the calculator is the way they are designed to be used but the apps are quick if you don't know how to use the calculator rings. But for imaging it's no substitute for a PoleMaster though.  




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