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Best cam for collimation assist + family viewing ? - Evo 8 inch HD

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#1 SanjeevJoshi

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Posted 27 September 2020 - 09:46 PM

Looking for a cam that can work with 1.25 or 2 eyepiece receptacle in star diagonal to serve two different purposes for Evo 8 inch HD scope:

 

1.  to assist in collimation - see the view live on my laptop, perhaps store one frame for record keeping and tracking

 

2.  show family the view of the night sky object.. with multi generational - the young and the old struggle to see with the eyepiece

 

Looking for something that I can use without much fuss.

 

The choices are many but I dont have AP experience to pick something good.  Looking to spend less than 500 dollars.


Edited by SanjeevJoshi, 27 September 2020 - 09:47 PM.


#2 VeloBob

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:47 PM

The simplest solution would seem to be the Revolution Imager R2 for $299.  An all in one package, it includes the camera, monitor, battery and all the cables.  It is not sophisticated--the camera is a re-purposed security camera--but everything is plug and play.  Stick it in instead of an eyepiece, turn the focus knob about seven turns, and an image will form on the screen.  According to a long thread on the EAA forum, it can give more sophisticated results and let you see DSOs that would otherwise be faint gray fuzzies if you learn how to use it, but the real benefit is its simplicity and ease of use.

 

Bob



#3 Gary Z

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:58 PM

I have used my Canon 600DDslr.  I got the idea from watching a video on You Tube: https://www.youtube....h?v=hqRVIDj4aZA

 

That being said, I use the articulating door and have it face forward. so that while I'm at the front of the scope I see the display.  I don't use the eyepieces.  I use the T-ring and T-adapter to connect to the back of the scope.  

 

As to the EAA, I saw a very interesting video of a gentleman using a sony A7 and a 127mm Maksutov.  However, I think the RI R2 might be the better way to go for this.  

 

Gary



#4 audioengr

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 04:50 PM

For the eyepiece replacement (this is what I do as well), there are some excellent non-cooled OSC choices in cameras.  These are primarily for planetary and brighter nebula and galaxies that are fairly small.  Bright small objects need a smaller chip and smaller pixels.  Sensitivity is not as much of a concern because the objects are bright, but read noise is always a concern.

 

the 178 sensor - ZWO ASI178MC or Orion Star-shoot Mini (also 178 chip) - around $400 - 6.4 Mpixels

 

the 462 sensor -  ZWO ASI462MC or QHY 5-III 462C - $299 - this is a newer product, - 2.1 Mpixels but lower read noise

 

the 290 sensor - ZWO ASI290MC - $249 - 2.1Mpixels

 

the IMX224 sensor - ZWO ASI224MC - $249 - 1.3Mpixels

 

I have the Starshoot Mini myself, the 178 chip.

 

 

 

For widefield AP of dim large objects using a Hyperstar on the front of the OTA, you will need a cooled camera with a big chip, like the ZWO ASI294MC, ZWO ASI533MC, ZWO ASI183MC or ZWO ASI2600MC


Edited by audioengr, 28 September 2020 - 04:52 PM.


#5 nic35

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 04:52 PM

You should probably browse the EAA (Electronically Assisted Astronomy) forum, which is what you are looking to do.  There are a lot of "how do I begin" topics over there.

 

Many folks started with the Revolution Imager, but quickly moved on.  But not all.

 

john



#6 audioengr

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 05:22 PM

For the eyepiece replacement (this is what I do as well), there are some excellent non-cooled OSC choices in cameras.  These are primarily for planetary and brighter nebula and galaxies that are fairly small.  Bright small objects need a smaller chip and smaller pixels.  Sensitivity is not as much of a concern because the objects are bright, but read noise is always a concern.

 

the 178 sensor - ZWO ASI178MC or Orion Star-shoot Mini (also 178 chip) - around $400 - 6.4 Mpixels

 

the 462 sensor -  ZWO ASI462MC or QHY 5-III 462C - $299 - this is a newer product, - 2.1 Mpixels but lower read noise

 

the 290 sensor - ZWO ASI290MC - $249 - 2.1Mpixels

 

the IMX224 sensor - ZWO ASI224MC - $249 - 1.3Mpixels

 

I have the Starshoot Mini myself, the 178 chip.

 

 

 

For widefield AP of dim large objects using a Hyperstar on the front of the OTA, you will need a cooled camera with a big chip, like the ZWO ASI294MC, ZWO ASI533MC, ZWO ASI183MC or ZWO ASI2600MC

Most of the non-cooled planetary cams have 1.25" nosepiece, so you add this adapter to get 2". Keeps the collimation centered nicely.




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