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Celestron eyepieces with new 8" Evo Edge

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#1 philc

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 08:01 PM

Does anyone have a good word for the 40mm or 13mm Plossls that I believe are supplied with the 8" Evolution? (I'm waiting like so many others for a delivery).

 

I think I read somewhere that the 40mm isn't bad.



#2 Eclipsed

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 08:58 PM

I can’t answer your question but I’d be interested in any feedback. I have an Evo 8 EdgeHD on order too.

#3 sanbai

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Posted 28 September 2020 - 10:41 PM

To know more about your question: what do you think it could be bad in those two eyepieces?

It's difficult to be wrong with a Plössl. I don't remember anything bad from these eyepieces. Probably if you ask that question, then the answer is "there are ok". Nothing spectacular, but great to start with.

Basically you get (only) what a Plössl can give. A small aparent field of view by *today's* standards and eye relief that is 0.9x the focal length. Optical performance is going to be satisfying, especially in a f/10 telescope like yours. If you haven't tested other type of eyepieces, then you'll be certainly very happy and will focus on the object, not on the glass.

One should know that the maximum true field of view in a Plössl with 1.25" barrel is achieved with a 32mm. Thus, the 40mm results in a the same TFoV but smaller apparent one (40 ° vs 50°). The exit pupil is however larger, so extended objects will be brighter in the 40mm.

If your plan is to add or replace eyepieces, my advise is first to enjoy what you have and learn more about eyepieces in the "advise" and learning pages of websites like televue, agena astro or eyepiecesetc.com. Then, you will figure out what you want and need.

I like fine eyepieces, but I have to admit that my eye and my f/10 scope may not be up to the challenge of discerning the good from the excellent.

Edited by sanbai, 28 September 2020 - 10:43 PM.


#4 PLShutterbug

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 06:59 AM

I got the same 2 with my Evolution 6”.

 

The 40mm is ok. Fairly narrow field of view, ok sharpness. I have since replaced it with a Baader Hyperion 21mm. With the Baader’s 68° FOV the resulting field is almost identical, but appears larger and the Baader is much sharper.

 

The 13mm is poor. OK sharpness but the exit pupil is tiny and FOV is narrow. With glasses it is basically unusable. I replaced it with a Hyperion 10mm and really like it.



#5 audioengr

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 01:00 PM

The 9 and 13mm are $25-30 eyepieces, new.  I gave the 9mm away and keeping the 13mm for finder duty in my guidescope.  The 32mm E-Lux I sold.  It is a $60 eyepiece, new.

 

I am using this one mostly. Highly recommended.  Not as wide as my 22mm Nagler, but very flat.


Edited by audioengr, 29 September 2020 - 01:01 PM.


#6 PLShutterbug

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 05:14 PM

The 9 and 13mm are $25-30 eyepieces, new.  I gave the 9mm away and keeping the 13mm for finder duty in my guidescope.  The 32mm E-Lux I sold.  It is a $60 eyepiece, new.

 

I am using this one mostly. Highly recommended.  Not as wide as my 22mm Nagler, but very flat.

Quick shout out to Don at Eyepiecesetc.com. He has been a huge help to me in selecting the right eyepieces, and with astronomy subjects in general while doing so.



#7 audioengr

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 05:16 PM

Quick shout out to Don at Eyepiecesetc.com. He has been a huge help to me in selecting the right eyepieces, and with astronomy subjects in general while doing so.

Don is willing to talk to you for an hour on the phone about Nagler and his history and all of his eyepieces and many other things.  Great guy.  Bought several eyepieces from him.



#8 philc

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 06:57 PM

Thanks for the comments. I have three TV Plossls and a 27mm Panoptic (and 2” diagonal) that I used with a scope I’ve since sold, but not in these focal lengths. Sounds like the supplied eyepieces won’t blow me away.



#9 PLShutterbug

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Posted 29 September 2020 - 07:02 PM

Thanks for the comments. I have three TV Plossls and a 27mm Panoptic (and 2” diagonal) that I used with a scope I’ve since sold, but not in these focal lengths. Sounds like the supplied eyepieces won’t blow me away.

Right. Celestron probably feels they have to give people something, but they also realize that people will develop their own preferences. So they spend maybe $5 per eyepiece CoGS and give you something that will at least let you see an image. I wish they'd save that $10 and provide a right-angle finder that doesn't stab into the eyepieces, or provide a better tripod leg tightening mechanism.



#10 sanbai

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 12:05 AM

Thanks for the comments. I have three TV Plossls and a 27mm Panoptic (and 2” diagonal) that I used with a scope I’ve since sold, but not in these focal lengths. Sounds like the supplied eyepieces won’t blow me away.

If you have a Panoptic to compare with then, the magic of these cheap eyepieces is gone. You will put them aside as soon as possible (this is what I did).

Still, those are Plössl. When I was a child I got a scope with Huygens, nothing rare back then. Put one in the focuser and the Plössl will look totally luxurious.
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#11 philc

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 01:35 AM

If you have a Panoptic to compare with then, the magic of these cheap eyepieces is gone. You will put them aside as soon as possible (this is what I did).

Still, those are Plössl. When I was a child I got a scope with Huygens, nothing rare back then. Put one in the focuser and the Plössl will look totally luxurious.

Good point. As a teenager I had a Ramsden.  These Plossls would have been pretty classy in comparison. 



#12 Eclipsed

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Posted 08 October 2020 - 11:00 AM

Well I got my Evo 8 EdgeHD yesterday. Put it together and took it outside last night. It was clear but not the best viewing, plus I live in a Bortle 6 zone. Well both eulyepieces work fine with some minor things:
Field of view: not great I’m guessing 42 to 45 deg.
Sharpness: 40mm was crystal clear across entire image. Nice contrast. 13mm was a bit disappointing in sharpness but the conditions may have been part of that. FOV about same as the 40.
Eye relief: not very good. You have to be pretty close and place your eye exactly in the right spot.
The eyepieces have a rubber ring around them which can be unfolded to help reduce unwanted light.
After looking at Mars, it seemed really bright even with the 13mm.

#13 audioengr

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Posted 08 October 2020 - 11:16 AM

Well I got my Evo 8 EdgeHD yesterday. Put it together and took it outside last night. It was clear but not the best viewing, plus I live in a Bortle 6 zone. Well both eulyepieces work fine with some minor things:
Field of view: not great I’m guessing 42 to 45 deg.
Sharpness: 40mm was crystal clear across entire image. Nice contrast. 13mm was a bit disappointing in sharpness but the conditions may have been part of that. FOV about same as the 40.
Eye relief: not very good. You have to be pretty close and place your eye exactly in the right spot.
The eyepieces have a rubber ring around them which can be unfolded to help reduce unwanted light.
After looking at Mars, it seemed really bright even with the 13mm.

Get yourself a used 22mm Nagler.  Great everything.  It will become your go-to eyepiece.



#14 Eclipsed

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Posted 08 October 2020 - 04:17 PM

Is a Nagler good for planetary viewing? While a 22mm will be a great fit between my 13 and 40mm eyepieces I don’t think it’s going to give me enough magnification for the best seeing conditions. My 8” has a Focal Length of 2032mm (F/10). A 22mm (92x) gives a view that is probably very nice for the moon but for Saturn I think I need double that based on my 13mm view. Maybe a 10 or 11mm?

#15 sanbai

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Posted 08 October 2020 - 05:20 PM

The larger field stop in a Plössl is achieved with a 32mm. A 40mm Plössl cannot show a larger true field, do it shrink the apparent field of view and offers larger exit pupil.

A 22 Nagler is awesome, but the magnification is too low for planets. 13mm is my starting point for the task. With the 22 Nagler you would need a 2" diagonal and visual back (included in the 60 anniversary edition, I think, but not the regular ones)

Edited by sanbai, 08 October 2020 - 09:59 PM.


#16 12Bass

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Posted 08 October 2020 - 09:20 PM

For Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, I'd be looking at 11mm down to 6mm or so, depending on seeing.  With my NexStar 8 GPS (not HD), the ES82 11mm usually works well, and sometimes I can get a decent view using the 6mm that came with the Celestron eyepiece and filter kit (4mm is generally not usable, except perhaps on the Moon).  7 to 9mm may also work, again depending on conditions. 

 

The ES68 24mm offers the same actual field of view as the 40mm Celestron eyepiece, but with higher magnification.  Personally, I'm okay with 68° FOV, which seems fairly wide when compared with the narrow FOV of the Celestron 40mm.  82° FOV is nice at times, but I find I really have to search around to see everything, though some people really like that.  Another option that many like is an 8-24mm zoom eyepiece (like the Baader Hyperion), though that also comes with compromises.  Note that extremely precise collimation and focus are especially important for achieving a sharp image at higher magnifications.



#17 sanbai

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Posted 08 October 2020 - 10:10 PM

I only have one only 70° eyepiece in use (not much, actually) the rest are larger aparent field of view. 70 ° is large enough to feel the wide apparent field. however, the nagler 22 is very immersing. Even is it takes a bit of effort to take all the field, it's a pleasure to use.

I find very helpful having very wide fields, as the chances to get a bright star in the field are higher, and that helps refocusing when needed. Although with go-to this is a minor problem. Aside, panoramic views can be fabulous. C8, Nagler 31 and Markarian's chain...

Edited by sanbai, 08 October 2020 - 10:10 PM.



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