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Benefits of a 80mm refractor over a 127mm MAK ?

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107 replies to this topic

#101 Tom Stock

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:24 PM

My main scope currently is a C8. I looked thru my buddy's 125 Mak and found views very good but the FOV very narrow.

 

Recently I picked up an ST80 for a quick grab and go. Out and battle mosquitos and run back in.  Not looking at planets... just a short look.  This is for cluster hopping.

 

I'm impressed! For a $100 scope it's way better than I expected. I could easily see detail on mars at 88x.  I couldn't go any higher because my shortest eyepiece is a 9mm (in combination with a barlow). Saturn, while tiny looked good.

 

Open clusters are beautiful in this little scope. Pleiades looks fantastic.  This is where the little scope really shines.

 

The moon looks darn good too, and even better if you use the dust cap with center cap removed to make it a tiny F10.

 

It's nice to have a scope that has a specialty.

 

I was using a crappy camera tripod to decide if I would keep the ST80, but have now purchased a small grab and go equatorial mount for it (EXOS Nano).  When it cools off I'll even put it on my AVX for a night.

 

Of course the Mak will easily out perform the ST80 on planets and globulars.


Edited by Tom Stock, 24 October 2020 - 10:33 PM.


#102 cupton

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:35 PM

Can’t remember if I posted this or not but I thought this was a fun read. Using Jupiter as a target for a scope shootout.

https://astro.ecuado...idt-cassegrain/
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#103 hcf

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:40 PM

One of the benefits of AP with a ST80 clone over an 80ED or a Mak is the lower weight.

 

I put my Meade Adventure 80 and a DSLR on an entry level EXOS Nano EQ  mount, and added DIY RA guiding to it. I mostly use AP  for observation. I image to see objects (not necessarily in real time) that I cannot see with my 8" Dob in my  skies.

 

If you want to dabble in AP, a setup like mine inspite of the CA, is very useful. WIth the DSLR and a guidescope/cam I am close to the weight limit for AP on this mount (half the normal payload).

 

Some links:

 

Adding  DIY RA guiding to the EXOS Nano EQ:  

https://www.cloudyni...-nano-eq-mount/

 

Stuff I can image to see with the above setup:

https://www.cloudyni...icks/?p=8983922

 

A recent image:

https://www.cloudyni...otos/?p=9938305


Edited by hcf, 24 October 2020 - 11:18 PM.

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#104 sojourneyer

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 11:21 PM

Can’t remember if I posted this or not but I thought this was a fun read. Using Jupiter as a target for a scope shootout.

https://astro.ecuado...idt-cassegrain/

very good . I read this before but could not find it. thanks



#105 sojourneyer

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 11:28 PM

Well I just took out my 127Mak and did a comparison with my SV 80ED

Here is what I experienced.

 

Firstly the viewing tonight and last night were comparable.  I viewed the SV

and the Mak with the same EPs  - mid grade svbony and SV EPs.

 

As to the planets the SV beat the socks off the Mak. I was surprised. I think one main reason is that the focuser is not as good as a dual and that means a lot.  I could not get the crisp resolution that I had with the SV .  Also perhaps the Mak was not cooled down adequately.

 

When I got up to about 125X on Jupiter that was the end of the story.  I could get Saturn at 250X but the belts were not nearly as clear and clean as the SV at 190X

 

With the Mak my FOV was greatly restricted compared to the fast 80ED. Viewing Mars I felt like I was at LeMans constantly shifting gears with the gears being the slo motion controls

 

What the Mak excelled at however was the moon..   At 250 X things were great but you could only see a small portion of the moon.

Given this experience, my plans are: 
Mak the Moon.
ED the planets and DSO .
102 Omni Achromat for DSO and planets (the CA was not bad at all)

 

I recall when viewing Jupiter and Saturn a week back with the Achromat, I thought it was better than the Mak.

 


Edited by sojourneyer, 25 October 2020 - 12:07 AM.


#106 barbie

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 08:37 PM

When I compared my 4" Mak to my f9 100mm ED apo a couple of years back, I reached the same conclusions. The Mak is more portable and easier to mount, but high magnification images of the planets were not as good as in the ED apo refractor. Deep sky was no contest. Here, the refractor won handily.


Edited by barbie, 25 October 2020 - 08:49 PM.

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#107 paulsky

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Posted Yesterday, 12:25 PM

In comparision for terrestrial observations, which is best , a ED80 or the 127 MAK ?

Thanks,

Paul.



#108 sojourneyer

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Posted Yesterday, 12:36 PM

I would say the ED80 because of its wider field of view and greater resolution with the dual focuser. But it all depends on what you are viewing.   If it was whale watching I would definitely use the 80ED.

 

The Mak long focal length will mean in all likelihood the magnifications would be in the area of 50X and up (using a 50mm EP)


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