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Newbie with a bingo question

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#1 Focal7

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 10:29 PM

Hello all, new to the site and want to buy some binocs. for astronomy use. Have found 3 used local sets for sale on the internet. Wondering about pros & cons. Will likely buy a parallelogram for ease of use. Sets are:

1. Zhumell 25x100.   $200
2. Celestron 25x100 Skymaster  fov3.   $200

3. Celestron 20-100x70  Skymaster.  1.25 degree @ 20x Bak 4 prisims.   $50
my plans are to use primarily for lunar & planetary viewing.  Im sure field of view is important but I don’t currently know my needs.       Any advice???    Thanks for any and all help gentlemen!



#2 John Fitzgerald

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 10:32 PM

Those binos are for wide field viewing.  They will show some lunar craters, and some of Jupiter's moons, but are definitely not for planetary viewing.


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#3 Obx

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 10:39 PM

I think you would be better served by an 80mm refractor and a couple of Plossl eyepieces. 


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#4 ihf

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 10:46 PM

1. Don't get a bino for planetary. Nothing to see there.

2. Don't get a zoom bino, it does not bring joy.

3. Don't get the inexpensive 25x100 as they could be out of collimation (prisms) and have not great eye relief if you wear glasses.

 

Get a better quality 7x50/10x50 for stars if you want. Aculon, Action Ex, Oberwerk, APM.

Or get a refractor or one of the longer 6 inch Dobsonians.


Edited by ihf, 30 September 2020 - 10:46 PM.

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#5 tony_spina

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 11:09 PM

Get a short tube 80mm refractor if you primarily want to do planets and lunar viewing.  The refractor will give you more flexibility in magnification than a fixed magnification binocular 

 

https://www.amazon.c...,aps,233&sr=8-3


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#6 Focal7

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 11:12 PM

Thank you, I’m learning. I already have a 8”SCT  so the binos  are for the other guests and me when I don’t want to bother with the scope.



#7 JohnBear

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 11:20 PM

If you want to do "bino" (2 eye) planetary viewing the you would want to us a "binoviewer" on your SCT - which does give a quite amazing experience on the planets.  Worth looking into.

 

Otherwise. a 10x50 (or less) binocular is probably your best bet.  10X50 is about the limit for being able to hold a binocular steady enough to really enjoy what you see. 


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#8 Tony Flanders

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 08:06 AM

Thank you, I’m learning. I already have a 8”SCT  so the binos  are for the other guests and me when I don’t want to bother with the scope.

That makes the argument for getting a small refractor rather than binoculars even stronger.
 


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#9 SonnyE

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 11:09 AM

If you want to do "bino" (2 eye) planetary viewing the you would want to us a "binoviewer" on your SCT - which does give a quite amazing experience on the planets.  Worth looking into.

 

Otherwise. a 10x50 (or less) binocular is probably your best bet.  10X50 is about the limit for being able to hold a binocular steady enough to really enjoy what you see. 

John Bear is thinking the same thing I was when I read you already have the C8.

 

If you still want a guest observing platform, may you would like the Orion Monster Parallelogram package. I'm currently waiting my parallelogram shipment ~ 10/06/20.

My reason is to have an observation station to go along with my 80 mm imaging equipment.

 

Everybody around me sez, "Oh, I'd like to look through your telescope."

"Sorry. It's for imaging, and not for viewing."

So I'm gearing up for observing. "Here, sit down in the chair right there, and let me show you how it's done."

I have single digit grandkids and friends who are interested. Sit them down, swing the mounted binoculars in front of their faces, and listen to the Oooz and Ahhhs. wink.gif


Edited by SonnyE, 01 October 2020 - 11:14 AM.

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#10 Focal7

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 12:56 PM

Yes SonnyE, that’s what I’m thinking. I was just wrong on the planetary part. More for Lunar observing.



#11 ihf

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 01:56 PM

The moon is half a degree in size. At 20-25x it is about the size of your fist when your arm is stretched out. That is still pretty small. Also it is very bright, in absolute brightness and relative to the dark sky next to it. The former can make it somewhat unpleasant to look at with 4-5mm exit pupils. The latter can cause a lot of glare and color fringing to show, as the binos show 2-3 degrees of the sky (remember the moon is only 0.5 degrees, so it by far won't fill the view). This is true even for ED binos, as they tend to be very fast (f3.8...4) and show various artifacts on the moon.

 

You can still have fun with the binos under discussion, but not ideal tools for the stated objectives.


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#12 tony_spina

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 02:14 PM

Yes SonnyE, that’s what I’m thinking. I was just wrong on the planetary part. More for Lunar observing.

Then I would go with a small refractor like the Meade 80mm I linked above.  It's in your budget and will give you very nice views of the moon, as well as 12x binocular views with an inexpensive 32mm plossl. 

 

You will see the rings on saturn,  and a couple of the moons.  You will see the bands on Jupiter,  the great red spot, and 4 moons, plus all the bright DSOs. In a light easy to carry scope and mount 


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#13 harbinjer

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Posted 02 October 2020 - 11:23 AM

Hello all, new to the site and want to buy some binocs. for astronomy use. Have found 3 used local sets for sale on the internet. Wondering about pros & cons. Will likely buy a parallelogram for ease of use. Sets are:

1. Zhumell 25x100.   $200
2. Celestron 25x100 Skymaster  fov3.   $200

3. Celestron 20-100x70  Skymaster.  1.25 degree @ 20x Bak 4 prisims.   $50
my plans are to use primarily for lunar & planetary viewing.  Im sure field of view is important but I don’t currently know my needs.       Any advice???    Thanks for any and all help gentlemen!

1 and 2 will be somewhat similar. Don't get the zooms.  People have already suggested a small scope for what you want and they are right. However if you do want the giant binoculars, know that they DO work well for large nebulae and star clusters. They are also good for scannig the Milky Way. But you will probably need to be in dark skies to really enjoy them, whereas the moon and planets will look great anywhere, through a small scope.  Also know that parallelograms are expensive and I'm not sure all of them can hold 25x100's perfectly, so double check that. 


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#14 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 03 October 2020 - 03:03 AM

1 and 2 will be somewhat similar. Don't get the zooms.  People have already suggested a small scope for what you want and they are right. However if you do want the giant binoculars, know that they DO work well for large nebulae and star clusters. They are also good for scannig the Milky Way. But you will probably need to be in dark skies to really enjoy them, whereas the moon and planets will look great anywhere, through a small scope.  Also know that parallelograms are expensive and I'm not sure all of them can hold 25x100's perfectly, so double check that. 

 

And double check your neck.. straight through binos on a parallalogram mount are comfortable viewing near the horizon.. 

 

A small telescope with a diagonal is comfortable viewing just about the entire sky.

 

Jon


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