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Why no Glass produced in the states, this explains it.

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#51 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 09:09 PM

From your first link above...

 

"Meanwhile, the US’s only mine was shut down in 2015, and was sold to an American group funded by China’s Shenghe Resource Holding two years later. It has since resumed production, and it now ships minerals to China’s refineries."

 

And if there is a war between the US and China (or, something as simple as a recession in China) the Chinese are going to have a hard time moving that mine to China, aren't they?



#52 diligentskies

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 09:13 PM

I don't think that Corning was scattered to the winds,

they are just manufacturing glass and ceramics for the best profit, https://www.corning....rldwide/en.html ,

leaving the glass materials we are using to the other manufacturers.

 

Best,

JG

As a former employee of Corning, Inc I would have to 100% agree.

 

In the 90's I work in their Electronic Materials Plant in Erwin, NY and the Sullivan Park Product Research Center(PRC).

 

During my time there, I worked in manufacturing of a glass Frit used in the Space Shuttle Program(a high lead content glass with extreme desired thermodynamic properties).

Point to illustrate, each week I made about 1000 pound of this material. To which it was sold to the Government for nearly $5000 per pound. I was an operation of two.

 

Me and an QA engineer. So just figure it out, my efforts in the bottom line accounting is around $200 million. Yet compare to that of the nearly a four thousand work force producing ceramic substrates for the auto industry hat is just breaking even.

 

I always said and took extreme pride that I was carrying these four thousand on my back.

 

That said, and my father was also a Corning employee, as a top glass tank mason.
 

So, besides many projects he was involved in. He built a top secret glass tank(wink, wink, nod, nod I can not say more).

But once operational I was able to see the result of this production run. It fit into a shoe box and I was told that it was worth over 500 million. To the best of my knowledge these glass components are currently flying over our heads.

 

My point is as you suggest, comparing mass production to state of art, specifically when it comes to glass technology is a comparison of apple and oranges.

 

Now for the real hardship reality..., Sullivan Park no longer exists.

 

Perhaps the greatest concentration of optical/glass PhD scientists the world has ever put together in one place.

 

I believe the death nail for this product research division of Corning at Sullivan Park was the success of Asahi glass... aka Gorilla Glass aka smart phone glass.

 

In my opinion there can't be enough or deeper levels of hell for the MBA's that sold the bottom line closure of the Sullivan Park PRC.

 

If you are using the Internet you are currently using a product material I was deeply involved in as a research production technician. Namely, photon-optical glasses, not just the glass but the doping bubbles produced within the glass.

 

During my tenue product run... my estimate is we produced enough optics bulbs of glass to produce well over 250 thousand miles of fiber optics. And that is early 90's technology,. So my bet is I was producing the core opto-photonic back bone of the internet as we know it.

 

Just saying and it is my opinion...

 

We are being ripped off by those with just not enough knowledge to know better but with enough knowledge to frame the issues to thread the needle in bottom lines terms for the sell out.

 

So tell that to the solid state consolidate physicist I work with and personal knew.

Where is he now, likely working for some Chinese firm.

 

SADLY.

Sincerely,

mark


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#53 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 09:17 PM

The strategic reserves has optical glass as well as the various rare earth elements, so we are covered for any emergencies.  Many local US glass companies also keep large stocks of optical glass as well.  Was on one site a few days ago and one company kept 40,000 pounds of glass blanks up to 25" for optics.  So if any political drama happens am sure we have much more supply than needed for national defense needs to weather anything.

 

Indeed. One can find a wealth of information on worldwide mineral reserves on the US Geologic Survey website. Turns out the US has very large reserves on many minerals.

 

For the time being, we are not exploiting it. But that could change very quickly at need.

 

I was looking up platinum today and Royal Society of Chemistry lists the United States as having the third largest platinum reserve in the world:

 

https://www.rsc.org/...ent/78/platinum

 

(And BTW, the US is listed as the third largest reserve of Lanthanum.)


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#54 25585

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 07:56 AM

Who owns Edmund Optics, and where does their glass come from?



#55 csrlice12

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 09:33 AM

It's sad really....I remember as a child looking at the bottom of CocaCola bottles to see where it was made.  I also vaguely remember Corning having a plant near Gas City, Indiana.



#56 SandyHouTex

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 09:51 AM

Who owns Edmund Optics, and where does their glass come from?

I was wondering that myself.


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#57 j.gardavsky

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 10:05 AM

Who owns Edmund Optics, and where does their glass come from?

If Pilkington counts,

I used to know the quartz sand quarry in northern Bavaria where the Pilkington glass came from.

Pilkington (founded 1826) belongs now to Nippon Sheet Glass.

 

The natural fluorite crystals, which Abbe used to take for making the first Apo microscopes optics in 1886,

come from:

Oltschi Alpe, Berner Oberland, Switzerland.

 

The high tech glass will be today synthetized from the pure chemicals.

 

Best,

JG


Edited by j.gardavsky, 12 October 2020 - 10:05 AM.

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#58 NYJohn S

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 04:08 PM

Yes, we actually used a couple of the very first Nikon versions for our photodocs. Even got ~select~ best full-frame chips (KAFs?). My recollection is that they cost something like $20K each, and were all the rage. Considering how long ago that was... for their brief moment in the sun... the best darned coveted "professional" cameras around! Just a few years later they were retired as obsolete; I acquired the array, deftly stripping it from the body... and integrating it into my astronomy camera! Then went to back-thinned, and even bigger KAF16803 etc. etc. And the arrays on our deliverables completely dwarfed those little guys.

 

I lament the demise of the wonderful Kodak Tech Pan films, the 35mm version (TP2415) and also the 4x5 sheet film. Got a lot of really good pictures with that stuff!    Tom

That's interesting Tom.

 

To put into perspective what Kodak was up against when digital came around. I had a studio with 5 photographers. I purchased my first digital back for $20,000 (Just the back, no camera). Once I got it up and running I purchased 4 more. We were shooting so much Ektachrome 64 - 4x5 and 8x10 sheet film that the payment for backs & cameras was covered with the savings from the monthly film & processing. We also saved the money spent shooting polaroids for approval, Another company that couldn't adapt to the digital world. 

 

As far as Kodak lenses, I started working as a professional photographer in 1979. Most of the studios in NYC were still using Kodak's Ektar lenses. These were commercial studios shooting with 4x5, 8x10 and even some 11x14 view cameras. Most of the lenses were made in the 50's yet still in use professionally almost 30 years later. As time went on they were replaced with newer designs with better coatings from Schneider & Rodenstock. For Medium format Zeiss / Hasselblad was the standard until Phase one bought Mamaya and released new lenses.

 

I think it's also interesting that most Zeiss camera lenses are made in Japan these days, not Germany as many people assume. 


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#59 25585

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 04:23 AM

Astronomers saving glass for a rainy day... somehow... somehow... ?    Tom

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#60 Phil Cowell

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 09:46 PM

Be careful. Talk like that could get you on a kidnap list.

 

Yup...time for legislation requiring national registration of optical equipment in the hands of the peoples so the government knows where you are and what you have if they need to take your optics for national needs! 
 

https://www.trtworld...-minerals-40334

 

https://www.osa-opn....ptics_industry/



#61 vahe

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 07:14 AM

Yup...time for legislation requiring national registration of optical equipment in the hands of the peoples so the government knows where you are and what you have if they need to take your optics for national needs! 
 

 

The only time that we came close to having something like what you are suggesting was in the early eighties when CD (Compact Disk) players were introduced to the general public, for whatever reason these laser operating systems caught someones attention and we the consumers were asked to register the players when we returned the warranty cards.

.

Vahe



#62 SandyHouTex

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 09:19 AM

The only time that we came close to having something like what you are suggesting was in the early eighties when CD (Compact Disk) players were introduced to the general public, for whatever reason these laser operating systems caught someones attention and we the consumers were asked to register the players when we returned the warranty cards.

.

Vahe

I didn’t do that either.



#63 csrlice12

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 09:26 AM

It's why the Astronomy Underground does sketching.


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#64 RalphMeisterTigerMan

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 08:49 AM

Is it possible that Kodak may have hung on longer if they had sold the "optically perfect back-up mirror" for the Hubble Space Telescope to the highest bidder? Since Perkin-Elmer went under because of the spherical abberation fiasco, why didn't Kodak, who had been contracted to build the HST B/U mirror try selling it to someone. Instead of just leaving it in a storage case somewhere?

 

Clear skesi!

RalphMeisterTigerMan



#65 j.gardavsky

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Posted Yesterday, 10:34 AM

It's why the Astronomy Underground does sketching.

... and every sketch when posted, will automatically get the watermark: Classified

 

Just kidding,

JG




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