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Some very strange vesicles

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#1 Joneser

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 01:15 AM

These two stones were found using a metal detector, I had no ideal as to what I was looking at. I took these and several other stone to a number of rock and mineral shows trying to find someone that might be able to explain what I was looking at. All of the collectors and geologist I encountered were just as baffled as I was, none could ID or explain most of the stones I was showing them. I came across a retired geochemist from Nasa who tried to explain to me what I was looking at. I thought that those little green and white inclusions were some sort of gemstones but I was told that these are most likely frozen bubbles and all of the holes in these stones are what's called vesicles. Told that this was most likely caused by shocked metamorphism. It was suggested that these stones and many of the others that I had shown were most likely some very odd impactites that would take a lot of in deep research to confirm because most appear to be new or unknown.1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg 4.jpg 5.jpg



#2 Glassthrower

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 09:36 AM

Terrestrial conglomerate.



#3 Glassthrower

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 09:48 AM

All of the collectors and geologist I encountered were just as baffled as I was, none could ID or explain most of the stones I was showing them.

 

Then you are asking the wrong people.

 

I came across a retired geochemist from Nasa who tried to explain to me what I was looking at.

 

Any good geochemist should know in 2 seconds that this is a terrestrial rock. 

 

Look, I am not an expert and I have no college degree or professional credentials beyond about 12 years of collecting and dealing meteorites and impactites. I've talked to a lot of scientists, read the academic journals, and educated myself on the science. When I don't know about something meteorite-related, I have a handful of respected scientists that I can email and have an authoritative reply in short order. I try to stay on good terms with them, so they don't roll their eyes when they get another email from me with a pesky question about chondrules, chemistry, parent bodies, processes, etc. 

 

In addition to that, I have bought, sold, and traded thousands of meteorites, tektites, and impactites. Literally thousands. So, I do have some "eye" when it comes to rocks that might be meteorites or meteorite-related. I've seen them all - from grandpa's weird meteorwrong in a shoebox to authentic lunar meteorites and everything in between.

 

Several other members in here could say the same thing I just said. Some of them have been doing this for 20 or more years, and they make me look like an amateur. So, what I am getting at is, the collective knowledge base in this forum is pretty darn solid. If you get suspect rocks, then posting good clear photos here and taking to heart the feedback you get is a good way to expand your own knowledge and find that elusive impactite you are looking for. You are good at taking photos (better than me) and you have a passion for the subject. Eventually you might find something, but I would advise searching around known impact craters. That way, you can find verifiable impactites of different types to help hone your eye. I can help point you to some online resources for locating known impact structures across the US (and world).


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#4 Joneser

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 10:41 PM

I am in no position to argue with anyone about what these stones are and are not. What little I have learned has come from doing research, asking questions to geologist, collectors and people on forums. I'm just putting this stuff out there to see if anyone might have something like it to compare it to. 

 Quote: " Any good geochemist should know in 2 seconds that this is a terrestrial rock." Just curious here, everything that I have read and have been told about impactites says that all impactites are terrestrial rocks that have either mixed with the impacting body or they have been altered, modified or morphed during an impact event due to the high temp and pressure. Impactites are not meteorites, just a product of an impact event.


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#5 Meteor1

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Posted 20 November 2020 - 08:09 PM

Came across this just now. I have ~25 years of interest and experience in meteorites. About 20 more in geology. This is no meteorite, I don't think it's impactite either, and not a conglomerate. Certainly looks to be a porphyritic type of earthly lava with vesicles from gas bubles in the magma, some are filled with material that seeped through the rock after it solified. The dark material that filled the cavities seems of a bit unusual color, but it might be because of later metamorphism. The grade of metamorphism is hard to establish just from the photos. Meteor1
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#6 starbob1

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 08:40 AM

This guy is always trying to make every rock he finds is a meteorite, How many times has this happen. You must be one bored dude. 


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