Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

my first scope for the hobby

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 stargazingfun

stargazingfun

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 6
  • Joined: 25 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Ontario, Canada

Posted 14 October 2020 - 03:47 PM

I was gazing the sky with my son's Nikon binocular for a while and decided to upgrade to a better one.

 

Ordered the Nikon Monarch 82ED angeled in Aug, got it in Oct.

 

With the maximum magnification 60x, I could see blur textual on Jupiter, the ring of Saturn.

 

Going to use it mostly for visual and some basic astrophotography with a smart phone mount.

 

I am using my camera tripod (Manfrotto) for it and visually it is much better than the binocular. But it operates poorly for finding the stars. The mount (498RC2) is not for the job.

 

I would like to purchas a video mount like the Manfrotto N8 as suggested in other tread, but the price is almost the same as a EQ mount with tripod.

 

What would you suggest or is there any advantages with the video mount?



#2 ihf

ihf

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 495
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2019
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 14 October 2020 - 04:28 PM

1) Rotate the 498RC2 by 90 degrees into the notch.

2) Rotate the foot of the spotting scope by 90 degrees to the side.

 

Now connect. This should make a simple alt/az setup.


  • Mark9473 and stargazingfun like this

#3 stargazingfun

stargazingfun

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 6
  • Joined: 25 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Ontario, Canada

Posted 14 October 2020 - 06:45 PM

1) Rotate the 498RC2 by 90 degrees into the notch.

2) Rotate the foot of the spotting scope by 90 degrees to the side.

 

Now connect. This should make a simple alt/az setup.

Just tried it out in door, great suggestion. Thanks.



#4 ihf

ihf

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 495
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2019
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 14 October 2020 - 11:23 PM

I don't know the Manfrotto 498RC2, but from pictures it looks like it has a panoramic mode and can smoothly spin around its axis without unscrewing. Ideally the manufacturer put the center of gravity into the spotting scope at the ring foot with the default eyepice, so you should not need to tension the rotational axes too much. But make sure to tighten down the quick release plate well. The Manfrotto is specified to work up to 8kg, The Nikon spotting scope under 2kg so I think there should be no problem holding it. If think the scope is balanced well in this mode but for whatever reason you feel like you want a bigger ballhead take a look at the Sirui K40X, which is a real monster (or one of its smaller siblings).



#5 stargazingfun

stargazingfun

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 6
  • Joined: 25 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Ontario, Canada

Posted 15 October 2020 - 08:25 AM

I don't know the Manfrotto 498RC2, but from pictures it looks like it has a panoramic mode and can smoothly spin around its axis without unscrewing. Ideally the manufacturer put the center of gravity into the spotting scope at the ring foot with the default eyepice, so you should not need to tension the rotational axes too much. But make sure to tighten down the quick release plate well. The Manfrotto is specified to work up to 8kg, The Nikon spotting scope under 2kg so I think there should be no problem holding it. If think the scope is balanced well in this mode but for whatever reason you feel like you want a bigger ballhead take a look at the Sirui K40X, which is a real monster (or one of its smaller siblings).

You are right, I tried it last night when it was not so cloudy.

 

This method does a better job than before and I feel the scope is more stable.


  • ihf likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics