Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

The StellarVue 9 x 50 Finderscope Reverently Reimagined

accessories equipment sketching
  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Chesterguy1

Chesterguy1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 969
  • Joined: 21 May 2015
  • Loc: Stillwater, OK

Posted 20 October 2020 - 01:32 PM

StellarVue 9 x 50 Plus…

 

This is a demonstration drawing I did for and with my Drawing 2 class for their assignment. There were several goals including broadening their materials fluency, improving use of two point-or multi point perspective, and combining two or more reflective or polished objects to create a third object with a new purpose or alternative narrative. It’s also a project designed to foster precise rendering, sensitivity to gray values and light source and creating an illusion of three-dimensionality and space.

 

In my case I used my StellarVue 9 x 50 Finderscope turned on its side and angled away for the perspective, a small sculpture of a grasshopper made from a sparkplug, nails and other soldered or welded detritus--my first art fair purchase ($12—a princely sum when I was making 75 cents a week allowance) in 1969 that at the time I thought was ingenious--and a perplexed scientist. My thought was to create a kind of 1950s sci-fi or horror tableau combining a large refracting telescope (the visual pun for me is that it’s the SV 9 x 50 drawn roughly to scale) made to look like some amazingly huge refractor, a beacon that accidentally pulled in some oversized mechanized life form. Note the tiny astronomer/scientist’s reaction. My only regret is that I should have removed the lens cover.

 

The approach is called heightened drawing, which means working with a mid-toned paper, white chalk and charcoal to expand the value range on either side of the mid gray of the paper. It’s a technique that goes back to the Renaissance and Leonardo among others.

 

Charcoal Pencils, White Chalk Pencil and Pastel Pencils (on the grasshopper) on gray pastel paper. Students were only required to use the charcoal and chalk. Image size is roughly 10” x 15”. Paper size: 13.5” x 20”.

 

Seems to have softened slightly in making the image meet the file size restrictions for CN

 

Stellarvue 9 x 50 CN.jpg

 

Chesterguy


Edited by Chesterguy1, 20 October 2020 - 02:45 PM.

  • Reid W, havasman, wrnchhead and 2 others like this

#2 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 88,084
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 20 October 2020 - 02:07 PM

Mark:

 

Excellent.

 

I don't know why but just looking at it makes smile and chuckle.

 

Jon



#3 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 88,084
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 20 October 2020 - 02:11 PM

What was the process?  That's not a free hand drawing is it?

 

Jon



#4 Chesterguy1

Chesterguy1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 969
  • Joined: 21 May 2015
  • Loc: Stillwater, OK

Posted 20 October 2020 - 02:44 PM

What was the process?  That's not a free hand drawing is it?

 

Jon

Yes, freehand from a line drawing done first in pencil (graphite). PM me and I will give you a link to a website for my real work. I have some of my  reconstituted constellation series there. I had it here on the forums at one time, but a CN moderator said if violated the TOS agreement and the entire thread was pulled. I guess a few of them were PG-13 and not considered suitable for the broad audience here. Easy come, easy go.

 

Best,

 

Chesterguy

Mark



#5 Chesterguy1

Chesterguy1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 969
  • Joined: 21 May 2015
  • Loc: Stillwater, OK

Posted 20 October 2020 - 02:52 PM

Closeup (still a little soft, but you can see the threaded knob detail better). The small file size is quite limiting:

 

Stellarvue 9 x 50 closeup.jpg

 

Chesterguy


Edited by Chesterguy1, 20 October 2020 - 02:54 PM.


#6 TOMDEY

TOMDEY

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,983
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2014
  • Loc: Springwater, NY

Posted 20 October 2020 - 03:00 PM

Superb... in every way! I especially like your addition of the bronzish tone of the grasshopper's hexapod, head, antennae and ovipositor. That gravitates attention to the implicit tale you wove into your creation. The coloration is not overstated, helping encourage that subliminal, "Why do I keep returning to the grasshopper?!" Light from the left, shadows not too stark, interpretive looks like the scientist may soon be engulfed in a dark hearth flame?

 

I love the medium! 

 

[I was frequently sent out to field stations as optical test director. Once things were going smoothly, I would amuse myself by sketching hardware, to stay engaged and looking like I actually worked for a living. Light, shadow, reflections, perspective, vantage. The engravings of telescopes from centuries past intrigue me. Some seem to have taken substantial poetic license, with impossibly "blended perspectives" that are almost Picassoish. Always wondered if that was somehow mistaken or (more likely?) to show more features of the hardware in a single rendering, like an unfolded mechanical drawing. And of course --- Russel Porter's signature drawings of The Hale Telescope and Dome. Most notable that he rendered most from conceptual working meetings before the designs were even finalized!]   Tom



#7 LCWASTRO

LCWASTRO

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 718
  • Joined: 21 May 2020
  • Loc: Columbus, Ohio United States

Posted 20 October 2020 - 03:24 PM

WOW



#8 Chesterguy1

Chesterguy1

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 969
  • Joined: 21 May 2015
  • Loc: Stillwater, OK

Posted 20 October 2020 - 04:18 PM

Tom:

 

Thanks very much for your thoughtful response. I will look up Russel Porter's drawings. As with Jon, I'm happy to send you a link to a website with some of my other work, most specifically my "updating" of various constellation figures. A rather poor and tiny repro of one of the works from that series is my profile image of a former dog. Even though she was small she was a terror around any other dog no matter their size. Thus, she was perfect for my Canis Major

 

Chesterguy

Mark


Edited by Chesterguy1, 20 October 2020 - 04:21 PM.


#9 havasman

havasman

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,807
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 20 October 2020 - 06:22 PM

I too first laughed, particularly at the grasshopper. And I thought of Kwai Chang Kain. Most of my collection has made me laugh pretty consistently and it's very definitely something I admire in art and expect in life.



#10 lphilpot

lphilpot

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,655
  • Joined: 15 Oct 2005
  • Loc: Central Lousiana, USA

Posted 20 October 2020 - 09:24 PM

I remember long ago in one of my design classes we had a rendering assignment - A drawing from a photograph, with both mounted side by side. The goal was to not able to tell which was which from 3 feet. My submission passed, but for the life of me I can't recall what it was, nearly 40 years ago. There were lots of silverware renderings, for some reason.  :)

 

From college it was on to 15+ years in graphic design, then a left turn into IT, UNIX, chaos and now (in six long months) retirement.


  • Chesterguy1 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: accessories, equipment, sketching



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics