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What did I capture?

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#1 Grimstod

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 09:46 AM

This is a section of the Heart nebula. I noticed while going through my subs a momentary brightening of this star. Circled in red. This lasted only one 300s sub. Then it went back to normal for all my other subs. Any idea what it is? 

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  • 122233755_10157529704642050_9097997385097796938_o.jpg
  • 122235119_10157529704632050_957739547875579899_o.jpg

Edited by Grimstod, 21 October 2020 - 04:07 PM.

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#2 slepage

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 10:07 AM

Very interesting.  To have only have 1 star change is a bit hard to explain.  Given the fact that a stellar event would last longer then your 300 sec sub, I think you need to look more at your camera for the reason of the anomaly.  Some sort of electronic hick up on the sensor or the like, but anything that I could add at this point would be just a guess.

 

Steve   



#3 KTAZ

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 10:17 AM

Super interesting. Have you used Stellarium or another planetarium software to ID the star? Or upload it to Astrometry.net for a plate solve?

 

I find it hard to believe that your equipment brightened one star in the entire field. My question is whether is is a star or potentially a rotating geosynchronous satellite that caught a change in light reflection from the sun.

 

I'd do some more research.


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#4 slepage

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 10:24 AM

Super interesting. Have you used Stellarium or another planetarium software to ID the star? Or upload it to Astrometry.net for a plate solve?

 

I find it hard to believe that your equipment brightened one star in the entire field. My question is whether is is a star or potentially a rotating geosynchronous satellite that caught a change in light reflection from the sun.

 

I'd do some more research.

Yes, I like your idea of a rotating satellite, but then I thought that if that were the case then the OP should have more then 1 sub with the bright star, since the period of the brightness only lasted less then 300 sec.  Again, I'm not coming from a point of authority, just guessing and hoping someone has the true answer.

 

Steve   


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#5 KTAZ

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 10:42 AM

This is a good site to check into satellite flares...

 

https://www.satflare...p?q=iridium#MAP


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#6 choward94002

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 10:45 AM

I would plate solve it to see if it's a star, if so then follow these guidelines [https://www.iau.org/...es/discoveries/] ...

 

Let us know, I'm intrigued!  If you could let me know the RA/Dec of that star and I'll see if I've taken pix of that region as well ...



#7 Dan Crowson

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 11:19 AM

I plate-solved this image and there is a star right at that location - TYC 4050-2685-1 - http://simbad.u-stra...685-1&NbIdent=1. The star is not in the AAVSO VSX database so it isn't a known variable. The star just above and to the left should be brighter than it (TYC 4050-1978-1 - mag 10.65 V versus 11.63 V).

This one has me baffled. I guess it is always possible that you caught something like a cosmic ray hit right at that star on your exposure but that's just one of many 'glass half empty' theories.

Dan


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#8 Grimstod

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 04:06 PM

I can put these files on a drop box is you guys want to see the raw data. 

Like I said I was going though my subs deleting bad ones and this one just leaped to at me. 



#9 RazvanUnderStars

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 09:36 PM

It's not the only case in your photos. There are at least two more, I marked them in green. Both appear in the second but not in the first image. 

 

Cosmic rays are usually lines and three rays coming perfectly perpendicular to the sensor (so they don't leave a streak, just a point) are, I think, too unlikely.

 

I'm not an expert but suspect the cause is inside the camera.

 

 

star.jpg

 


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#10 choward94002

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 11:10 AM

So I found TYC 4050-2685-1 in a few pix I have and it appears "normal" and faint ... which doesn't give any information other than it's not a set of hot pixels.  It's in the simbad database [https://aladin.u-str...nails28957.html] [http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/simbad/sim-id?Ident=TYC+4050-2685-1] and it's visible from my dark site, so I've tasked one of my C14's for it and will take a series of pix over the next week ... if it's a supernova then we should see some changes ...

 

Interesting!


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#11 Grimstod

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 03:15 PM

You could be right. I did not see that one down there. The other smaller on though is pretty tinny. 



#12 RazvanUnderStars

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 04:57 PM

Can you post a 1:1 crop of the marked areas or the full file? I'm intrigued that the first case you identified shows a fainter star in place whereas in the second I found, there's no star visible in the first image, at least in the posted picture. 

 

If the stars get spuriously brighter, there may be a problem with the sensor (say, a spurious amplification of existing data - and to be clear, this is pure speculation on my part, trying to identify possible causes).

 

If the "new star" also appears where there was no real signal at all (no star), then the problem is not with amplification but rather with the sensor cell itself. By the way, what camera did you use?

 

 

Finally, can you blink images from previous sessions? You may find more cases and if you register the images, it'd be easier. 



#13 Grimstod

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 04:24 AM

This is the only image like this out of 30 frames.

I use a 1600mm Pro

I will have to pull up the images on the laptop to send a 1:1 image.

#14 pfile

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 03:02 PM

i've definitely had cosmic rays come in perpendicular to the sensor - so i wouldn't completely dismiss that.

 

rob


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#15 KTAZ

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 04:15 PM

i've definitely had cosmic rays come in perpendicular to the sensor - so i wouldn't completely dismiss that.

And what was it that definitively identified it as a cosmic ray?

Not being wise, I'm truly curious about this phenomena.

rob



#16 pfile

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:21 PM

multiple frames with hits where there were no known transients.




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