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database for images and subs - what do you use?

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#1 nathanm

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 03:18 PM

As one accumulates lots of both finished images and subs, it soon gets to a stage where you have thousands of files.  

 

There are a variety of ways to store these - either in a set of folders, or using a program like Lightroom that helps organize files and lets you search on them.

 

In the case of astro images we have a very specific way we can search for them which is by  RA, Dec.    If you store the images in a database that can do searches by RA Dec then in principle you could find subs from years back which overlap with a shot you are doing today, and thus could be stacked with it.

 

I don't know if any RA Dec oriented image databases exist - but somebody may have created one.

 

An alternative might be to use a program that allows geo-tagging images with Latitude, Longitude, and basically lie about the coordinates  - i.e. set Longitude to the Right Ascension (in degrees) and Latitude to Declination.   In principle that ought to work - the math for determining distance in Lat-Long space is very similar to that for RA, Dec.     That would allow RA, Dec queries.

 

Yet another alternative would be a planetarium program that allowed one to bring up images you had taken in context.    I know that some planetarium program can do something like this for an image or two, but I don't know of any that could store and (effectively) index into hundreds or thousands of images.

 

Anyway, I am curious to what others have done.



#2 RazvanUnderStars

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 04:52 PM

My plan is to put them in folders named by the main object in the images (for other objects, such as M110 in frames with M31, I can create a separate folder and inside have shortcuts to other folders).  A more elaborate program would allow finer searches but I found in time that apps have a certain lifetime and over a long time they tend to be replaced. Thus, I'm using the simplest form that will not make me have an elaborate migration routine 10 years later or face compatibility issues. 

 

Other than that, for a more elaborate cataloguing solution, it'd be great if the existing software for photography (such as Lightroom, Capture One or others) understood FITS headers the same way they read EXIF headers from regular images. Not sure if such extensions exist, the target market is much smaller than for photography.



#3 giorgio_ne

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 05:57 PM

What about deploying your own personal Astrobin?

https://github.com/astrobin/astrobin



#4 RazvanUnderStars

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 06:31 PM

Interesting idea. Now, putting on my software architect hat, it's a complicated setup. Fairly common for a scalable web-based solution, but really too much for a single user. There's a database, a message queue, a cache, a web server and more. All these are different pieces of software and as they evolve, maintaining the configuration will be work in itself, let alone the fact that all of them end up eating memory. Even with a Docker container, there's going to be maintenance for Docker itself and who knows what will work in 10-15 years? For a user experienced with these technologies and who enjoys them, it might work, but otherwise I'd recommend something simpler. 

 

What about deploying your own personal Astrobin?

https://github.com/astrobin/astrobin



#5 gatsbyiv

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 07:08 PM

Why wouldn't you just put the images in folders with the date and object name?  Put the relevant flats in the same folder, as well as the finished image(s).  You can put darks in a separate folder, labeled with date, exposure time, gain, and temperature.

 

I find that I have little desire to combine my current images with my old.  I look back at the old ones and shudder at how bad focus was, field rotation, mount errors, etc.  As you get better, you'll probably feel the same!  smile.gif


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