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Finding Cetus

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#26 clastro8*

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Posted 01 November 2020 - 02:53 PM

Ok, my pc browser saw me reading this thread at this web site and 'suggested' this other thread on Cetus at this web site, here:https://www.cloudyni...of-a-tail-r2843

 

..which says that the direction from Taurus to Cetus is a direction of southwest.  This is determined by holding the star chart from the article upside down overhead with the West (W) label near your eyes and the East (E) label on the far side.  Then the relationships among the celestial objects becomes clear when facing east, by noting that direction which falls along the space between W and S.

 

As to why when I first tried to do this a month ago seeing the real sky (as opposed to a star chart) and it appeared as I recall to be a direction of to the right and up a bit suggesting a direction of southeast (I might not be remembering this perfectly)--- I think the difference is the fact of the dome, as mentioned above, has depth whereas seeing the sky naked eye shows only two dimensions.   So the star chart captures the sky in 3 dimensions while your observing eyes only capture it in 2.    

 

If this is correct, I concede it is a more accurate conception of the directional relationships of celestial objects, though I am not sure it makes the process of star hopping for star gazing easier (especially for beginners).


Edited by clastro8*, 01 November 2020 - 02:54 PM.


#27 Mark9473

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Posted 01 November 2020 - 06:22 PM

You say you're familiar with the RA/Dec system, but I think you need to refresh that.

 

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#28 daniel_h

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Posted 01 November 2020 - 11:50 PM

 

 

If this is correct, I concede it is a more accurate conception of the directional relationships of celestial objects, though I am not sure it makes the process of star hopping for star gazing easier (especially for beginners).

it’s a big hard to use S,N West etc when many here are in different spots, look from my location in Australia , from where i am cetus is SW of taurus, or taurus in NE of cetus, this is easier to see, as its right near the NE marker 

 

but if i flip to canada, the image of cetus is harder to describe as its straight across, but still SW or WSW of taurus

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Edited by daniel_h, 01 November 2020 - 11:56 PM.


#29 Mr. Bill

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Posted 02 November 2020 - 01:43 PM

Planispheres are very helpful to orient yourself with a whole sky view....

 

https://www.davidcha...isphere-or-app/



#30 clastro8*

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Posted 04 November 2020 - 06:10 PM

Thanks for your comments.

 

I went back and reviewed my notes on this subject and realized I had been using Stellarium incorrectly.  As with a star chart, the correct use, when viewing the chart facing east, a direction of to the right and up is the direction of southwest.  Similarly, when facing east, a direction of to the right and down is the direction of southeast.

 

I still couldn't find Cetus I think because I couldn't find the correct angle of 'up,' so I looked on Stellarium for an object to the left of the Cetus pentagon but horizontal (easy to visualize) to it.    Varying the time of day clock got a simulation where the Pleiades was to the left of Cetus and horizontal to the pentagon, just what I needed.  

 

I then used the suggestion of PeterW to use my 10x50 fov 7 degrees to 'measure' 7 degrees between candidate stars in the assumed area of sky that might appear to form a portion of the pentagon, which is itself too large itself to fit in the fov.

 

And then I finally found all the stars that make up the pentagon, none of which could I see using naked eye alone.  

 

All in all, I learned a lot from the experience and am happy I did not give up trying.


Edited by clastro8*, 04 November 2020 - 06:11 PM.

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#31 Waddensky

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Posted 07 November 2020 - 07:40 AM

As with a star chart, the correct use, when viewing the chart facing east, a direction of to the right and up is the direction of southwest.  Similarly, when facing east, a direction of to the right and down is the direction of southeast.

I get the idea you are overcomplicating things here. If you need to find a constellation or a star, it's best to try when the object of interest is at it's highest point, that is, if it's due south (observed from the northern hemisphere). You can use Stellarium to find out when Cetus is in the south.

 

Then, when you face south, the west is where the Sun sets: to the right, and east is where the Sun rises: to the left. When I said Mira is west of Menkar, I meant to the right when Cetus is in the south.



#32 clastro8*

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Posted 07 November 2020 - 07:17 PM

I set out to follow the technique from the article I read which said to find Cetus a couple of hours after it rises in the early evening.

 

One of the reasons I asked about assumptions in #16 is to learn whether there is more or less an agreement about which direction is best to use.  I see your point about facing south and am glad you made it.

 

I can't see any of the stars of Cetus with naked eye and began this thread making a mistake thinking I had seen 4 stars of the pentagon with my 15x70's but the 5th was beyond its ability.   It sounded like a good explanation but was plainly incorrect.   I'm glad now to know better.




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