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Just bought my first telescope!

beginner eyepieces reflector
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#1 GabrielCsillaz

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 09:34 PM

Hello everyone!

A friend of mine was selling his scope and some eyepieces and made me an offer on them... ~200$

I have done some research but did not find if this scope is good or not but i thought that for a first scope should be enough. I'm feeling a little uncomfortable questioning if my choice of buying this one was correct so i'd like to share with you guys and hear some suggestions about it.

1 - Explore Scientific FirstLight 130mm f/4.6

2 - SVBONY Super Plossl 6.3mm + 10mm + 12.5mm + 20mm + 32mm

3 - SVBONY Barlow 1.5x & 2x achromatic

4 - Colimator laser


What do you guys think? Would this be enough to see at least some basic nebulas and planets?

Thanks a lot in advance for the discussions!


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#2 vtornado

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:26 PM

Hello Gabriel and welcome to CN.

 

The scope should work ok for you.  I'm not sure how sturdy the mount is but most 130 f/5 telescopes are optically good.

look up barlowed laser collimation.  A lot of low cost lasers and garden variety focusers  have enough play in them

that the laser does not give an accurate collimation.

 

http://www.smartavtweaks.com/RVBL.html

 

Because of the spacing of the eyepieces the barlow will not give you a lot of different magnifications.

32 > 16, 20 > 10, 12.5 > 6.25.  but ... you have a nice range of powers for your scope.

Barlowing the 6.3 probably will be too much power for the scope.  If the 6.3mm produces nice views

you might want to consider a 5mm in the future. Oh silly me, you can barlow your 10.

 

The scope will show nice view of Juipiter, Saturn, Mars and the Moon.

The number of nebula you see will be determined by the level of light pollution you have.

If you have dark skies you will be able to see plenty with a 5 inch scope.

 

The best thing you can do when this stupid pandemic is over is to find a club and

go out with them to a dark site.  An expert can help you find things, and

there is so much more to see under dark skies.


Edited by vtornado, 24 October 2020 - 10:31 PM.

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#3 Diomedes

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:37 PM

Welcome Gabriel !! you'll find that most telescopes are really good for observing  some targets while not ideal for others. Some general advice: 

  • Allow the scope to acclimate before observing, this makes a huge difference specially when observing at high powers.  
  • Try to stay with objects at the eye piece for as long as you can. I found this true specially for planets, there are moments of clarity where you can see a ton of details. So when observing planets I usually stay with them for about 20-30 minutes each. 
  • When hunting for Nebula & Galaxy, try doing this a new moon when the sky is darkest. Depending on where you live, the light pollution might make seeing Nebula or Galaxies near impossible. That being said I recommend trying out M31 The Andromeda Galaxy, even if your in the city, your in for a treat.
  • Star Clusters ! there's a lot of fun ones that you can easily see even from the city. Point your scope towards M45 Pleiades when you get a chance. 
  • Use planning software such as Stellarium, this will allow you to get the lay of the land before your session. 

Feel free to reach out if you have any questions. 


Edited by Diomedes, 24 October 2020 - 10:41 PM.


#4 GabrielCsillaz

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:42 PM

Hello vtornado,

 

Thanks a lot for your comment!

 

Regarding the eyepieces i'm just a beguinner but it seems intuitive that a 20mm + barlow 2x =/ 10mm. I think using two lenses to achieve the same as 1 must be worse... right? or is it almost the same?

 

Also, i'll read the article you sent regard the laser adjustment.... Thanks for sharing!!!!

 

@Diomedes

 

Really thanks for all the tips! i think i'm feeling really excited but with fear of the expectations vs reality xD

 

I tried as best as i could looking for real viewing and how they are... but i never even looked through one of the child telescope... i think that the feeling must be awsome!


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#5 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:43 PM

The telescope is a Newtonian.  It has two mirrors inside...

 

https://i.imgur.com/KW8n6hq.jpg

 

Those two mirrors must be aligned to one another, and for sharp, pleasing images.  The laser-collimator you have may need collimation itself, and before using it to collimate the telescope...

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=bE09_X43UUQ

 

Now, the farther away the laser is from a vertical surface, like a wall, the more accurate it will be after adjusting and aligning it.  However, collimating a Newtonian is bad enough without having to collimate the tool used to collimate the telescope in the first place.  The difficulty may have contributed to the sale.  The previous owner may not have been able to collimate it.  If you'd rather not mess with one of those, there are alternatives...

 

https://garyseronik....to-collimation/

https://garyseronik....pe-collimation/

 

It helps to center-spot the primary-mirror before collimating, if you use a Cheshire and/or a collimation-cap...

 

https://garyseronik....primary-mirror/

 

I don't use a laser myself.  I have one, and I collimated it more or less, but I use the passive-tools instead: a Cheshire with cross-hairs, and a collimation-cap.

 

Otherwise, you can enjoy magnifications from a low 19x, and all the way up to approaching 200x(with 2x and 3x barlows), and beyond even when observing the Moon.

 

Stellarium is a great app/program.  Download and install it, and you'll be able to see which objects are where on any given night...

 

http://stellarium.org/



#6 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:50 PM

Regarding the eyepieces i'm just a beguinner but it seems intuitive that a 20mm + barlow 2x =/ 10mm. I think using two lenses to achieve the same as 1 must be worse... right? or is it almost the same?

It can be worse when using two units for one power, if the units are of poor quality, but with better, modern eyepieces and barlows such is negligible.  SVBONY products are better than what comes with a kit, so you should be good there.  The atmosphere, and the accuracy of the telescope's collimation, may also conspire against you when wanting to ramp up the power.


Edited by Sky Muse, 24 October 2020 - 10:53 PM.


#7 GabrielCsillaz

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:56 PM

Hi Cosmos,

 

Thanks a lot for all the info!!!!

 

I was looking on this issue of collimation before buying the telescope but i did not think of colimating the laser itself! that was awsome!

 

I kept asking myself why i needed one of those if it was possible to colimate without any tools just as you sent it... my colleague just stated that with the laser it was "More accurate" xD

 

Well... i just hope that i do not enter in the group of those people that find it too dificult to appreciate the art :/

 

As i'm an engineer i thought that those equatorial and collimation issues were gone be easy :( guess i was kinda wrong hahaha

 

Thanks a lot for all the discussion!



#8 MisterDan

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 11:02 PM

If that was my first telescope, I would likely still have it. waytogo.gif  Did it come with a mount and tripod?

 

If all is in good condition, I think you will enjoy it.  Its focal length is 600mm, so you should not expect the planets to be huge and "in your face," as they appear in many images.  At 95x (using the 6.3mm Plossl), Jupiter will be small (perhaps half the size of your pinky fingernail at arm's length).  Mars will be a little smaller.  Try the 2x Barlow with the 10mm eyepiece, if you want to get closer to the planets.  One key advantage of a 2x Barlow is that it effectively doubles your telescope's working focal length, so you can use a 10mm eyepiece and yield 120x.  The 10mm eyepiece will have greater "eye relief" than the 6.3mm (eye relief can be thought of "how close your eye needs to get to the eyepiece to see its entire field of view").  The longer/greater an eyepiece's eye relief, the farther your eye needs to be to the eyepiece.  The idea is:  longer eye relief = "easier" view and more "room" and "comfort." Best advice:  observe, observe, observe.

 

The FirstLight's forte will be wide fields of view -- star clusters, nebulae, scanning & sweeping the Milky Way.  The 32mm will yield about 19x and a 3-degrees-wide view (the full Moon spans about half of one degree).  Again:  observe, observe, observe.

 

Best wishes and congratulations.

Dan


Edited by MisterDan, 24 October 2020 - 11:04 PM.

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#9 GabrielCsillaz

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 11:08 PM

Hello MisterDan,

 

It came with the OEM tripod.

 

Nice tip regarding the 2x with the 10mm... making it better than using just the 6.3mm for eye relief...

 

Today is cloudy and i did not even mounted it yet. As soon as i have some time i might as well try for the first time in dark skies instead of in the house were i live xD

 

Thanks everyone for all the attention!



#10 arrrrgon

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 12:03 AM

Welcome. I don't know anything about the scope, but I love my svbony eyepieces. It sounds like a nice setup for $200.

#11 GabrielCsillaz

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 08:44 AM

Hello arrrrgon!

 

I thought of buying the aspherics eyepieces too... but... i think i'll settle for a while and just enjoy what i have. maybe in the future xD

Thanks for the comment



#12 cuzimthedad

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 12:34 PM

Welcome to CN Gabriel and congratulations on your "new" scope. I strongly suggest getting out under the stars to familiarize yourself with it's functionality and to learn it's quirks then after a couple observing sessions...or even after the first...come back with your questions. You'll find folks here more than willing to answer them and help get you comfortable in the field with your scope. Practice makes perfect and you are entering a wonderful hobby that will provide enjoyment for a lifetime.


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#13 ed_turco

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Posted 26 October 2020 - 09:30 AM

This is a nice deal and a fair one too.  A very nice beginning.

 

(I started with a 40mm refractor in 1957.)




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