Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Guide scope advice - Will an EQ5 Suffice?

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 tommo4523

tommo4523

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 27 October 2020 - 04:08 AM

Hi everyone again,

 

I have made up my mind and will be selling my 12" Dob to get started with AP.

 

I am considering a EvoStar ED80 and an EQ5 mount with GoTo, I will probably use a $300 AUD ZWO camera (something entry level to get started). However, I am unsure about a guide scope, it seems like I will have to buy another 50mm telescope and another camera just to enhance my tracking, on top of that, I have no idea how that connects upto my GoTo and all the stuff to get it working correctly, to me it seems I will have to spend a fair amount of money more to get a guide scope up and running, I am looking to spend the least amount of money for a respectable 80mm refractor setup for DSO, is a guide scope really necessary if I am getting an EQ5 or HEQ5 mount, or will I be just fine with the mount for imaging DSOs. If I do need a guide scope what does everyone recommend for the most financially friendly option, I really do not want to spend alot more than I am already planning to.

 

Thanks in advaned Tom,


Edited by tommo4523, 27 October 2020 - 04:14 AM.


#2 RJF-Astro

RJF-Astro

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 680
  • Joined: 13 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Zeist, Netherlands

Posted 27 October 2020 - 04:34 AM

Hi Tom, sound like you are taking the right steps. An EQ5 will handle that 80mm, but I would not count on much more. So that is something to consider. With and HEQ5 you can notch it up to a 100mm refractor or 6" reflector.

 

Now the ZWO camera, is that for guiding or imaging? For guiding you can go cheaper (120MM mini or similar). But for DSO imaging, suitable cameras are much more expensive. I would look at a dslr or mirrorless camera with this budget for DSO.

 

And the guidescope itself: I would recommend using one. It will make accurate tracking much easier. A cheaper 30mm or 50mm will do fine, even a 50mm finder scope with adapter to fit a M42 camera will be an improvement over no guiding. Such as this one. You will need an extra dovetail on top of the telescope to mount the guidescope. You can mount it to the tube ring if you want to save up. But a single screw connection is vulnerable to unwanted rotation, introducing what is called differential flexure.

 

Here is how I mounted mine in my early period. It was fine:

 

DSC_0341.jpg

 

Two years later and I have a more secure connection. Still fine, but I have doubled the focal length and do 8 minute narrowband subs and that is more demanding on the mechanics:

 

102 triplet.jpg

 

Get the basics right but do not overdo it. Get started and see where the hobby takes you.



#3 sg6

sg6

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,270
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2010
  • Loc: Norfolk, UK.

Posted 27 October 2020 - 04:49 AM

Not 100% sure it would be worth the expenditure.

Reason is simply that the 80mm is still a doublet so expect some CA to appear. Next is that there are a lot of good images with 30-60 second exposure lengths and with a little effort you should mange that region. I set mine up to 40 second exposure and 20 second Wait. In effect each cycle is 60 seconds duration, just makes it easy = 1 a minute. Don't need to engage brain much. Do have a DSLR however and that makes a difference.

 

Dark frame appear to suggest a load max of 6Kg for the EQ5, so with regards capacity you should be OK.

 

Easy answer is: Don't bother.

Get the EQ5 and the scope and the camera, set it all up and collect say 40/45/60 second exposures, stack say 120 of them and see what the results are like.

Then if you decide you need guiding get it a little further along.

 

As you are or seem to be in Aus I suppose polar alignment is more difficult. Polaris is a very useful thing to have. And we are keeping it!!! Also Aus prices are seemingly high.

 

Concerning costs would it be worthwhile purchasing say a ZS73 direct from William Optics and having it shipped to you over buying from a retailer in Aus ?

 

You will likely want a flattener more then guiding at least initially so make sure such is obtainable for the scope.

 

Really do think we need a sub-60 second image section. Seems at times the talk is of how long someone managed to guide for rather then how good the image turned out.

Sort of 600 seconds guiding and garbage image is better the 60 seconds (guided or unguided) and a good image.



#4 the Elf

the Elf

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,884
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 27 October 2020 - 04:49 AM

Don't rush into it! You need a setup that fits your budget and expectations. You also have to think about short term and long term. If you start low priced now you well sell it all in one or two years and upgrade. Some say you loos money this way, others say starting small was ok, a little loss is not a problem. If your budget is limited you can start ungided with a short focal length and even with a DSLR to learn the basics.

An EQ5 is ok for light scopes with short and medium focal length. An EQ6-R will serve you longer. It can handle bigger scopes and a longer focal length. Too cheap telescopes create bad fringes and CA in the image. If you expect good quality get an FPL53 triplet. If you have to compromise to stay within the budget go for an FPL53/lanthan doublet. Mind you need a flattener for imaging or you have to buy a flat field telescope. Regular scopes come with a curved field. You can start without flattener if the object is small. If you go for broadband targets (galaxies, star clusters) or bright emission objects (orion nebula, rosette nebula) any DSLR will do. If you find a modded used one it will pick up more of the red Ha. DSLRs are easy to use. An astro camera needs a computer. Think twice how much complexity you like to deal with. Here is some info for the start. Mind the book list at the end.

http://www.elf-of-lo...ingStarted.html



#5 tommo4523

tommo4523

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 27 October 2020 - 05:04 AM

 

Now the ZWO camera, is that for guiding or imaging? For guiding you can go cheaper (120MM mini or similar). But for DSO imaging, suitable cameras are much more expensive. I would look at a dslr or mirrorless camera with this budget for DSO.

 

And the guidescope itself: I would recommend using one. It will make accurate tracking much easier. A cheaper 30mm or 50mm will do fine, even a 50mm finder scope with adapter to fit a M42 camera will be an improvement over no guiding. Such as this one. You will need an extra dovetail on top of the telescope to mount the guidescope. You can mount it to the tube ring if you want to save up. But a single screw connection is vulnerable to unwanted rotation, introducing what is called differential flexure.

 

Thanks for that, that really helps with where I am heading, I will probably end up getting a cheap 30mm and a cheap camera, the one you suggested looks good, which camera would you reccomend for the guiding camera? And with regards to the main camera I was looking at the ZWO ASI120MC-S, do you think that will be good? what would you recommend for this setup. I have no experience with photography so the camera stuff I am not as confident with, so any advice in that department would help.

 

 

 

As you are or seem to be in Aus I suppose polar alignment is more difficult. Polaris is a very useful thing to have. And we are keeping it!!! Also Aus prices are seemingly high.

I am in Aus so prices are steeper than most places, shipping is incredibly expensive for some reason, 

 

 

Don't rush into it! You need a setup that fits your budget and expectations. You also have to think about short term and long term. If you start low priced now you well sell it all in one or two years and upgrade. Some say you loos money this way, others say starting small was ok, a little loss is not a problem. If your budget is limited you can start ungided with a short focal length and even with a DSLR to learn the basics.

An EQ5 is ok for light scopes with short and medium focal length. An EQ6-R will serve you longer. It can handle bigger scopes and a longer focal length. Too cheap telescopes create bad fringes and CA in the image. If you expect good quality get an FPL53 triplet. If you have to compromise to stay within the budget go for an FPL53/lanthan doublet. Mind you need a flattener for imaging or you have to buy a flat field telescope. Regular scopes come with a curved field. You can start without flattener if the object is small. If you go for broadband targets (galaxies, star clusters) or bright emission objects (orion nebula, rosette nebula) any DSLR will do. If you find a modded used one it will pick up more of the red Ha. DSLRs are easy to use. An astro camera needs a computer. Think twice how much complexity you like to deal with. Here is some info for the start. Mind the book list at the end.

http://www.elf-of-lo...ingStarted.html

 

The EvoStar ED80 uses a doublet FPL53, at this point triplets are just far too expensive, I think the doublet with the FPL53 is a pretty good starting point, with that in mind will I notice a MASSIVE difference between that and a triplet, what sort of imaging can I expect?

 

 

 

I am not much of a photographer and all my experience comes from using a 12 inch dob for the past 5 years, so when it comes to the actual camera side of things I am looking for the most straight forward way, mind you I am not close minded and am very keen to learn all the intricacies and I want to have a complete setup from the get go (albeit a basic one) so I can "learn the ropes" but I also don't want to overwhelm myself straight away.



#6 RJF-Astro

RJF-Astro

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 680
  • Joined: 13 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Zeist, Netherlands

Posted 27 October 2020 - 05:15 AM

Thanks for that, that really helps with where I am heading, I will probably end up getting a cheap 30mm and a cheap camera, the one you suggested looks good, which camera would you reccomend for the guiding camera? And with regards to the main camera I was looking at the ZWO ASI120MC-S, do you think that will be good? what would you recommend for this setup. I have no experience with photography so the camera stuff I am not as confident with, so any advice in that department would help.

 

I would get the 120MM (monochrome) mini for guiding, that will serve you well.

 

For a main imaging camera, I would get a DSLR or mirrorless camera. An entry level Nikon or Canon will be the easiest in terms of available resources online. The 120MC will not be a very good camera for deep space photography. It has a very small chip compared to a DSLR. It is more suited for planetary imaging or guiding, although a monochrome camera (MM) does a better job as a guidecam.

 

The ED80 will be great to start out with, but Elf has a good point: do include the dedicated reducer/flattener, or corner performance will suffer from field curvature.



#7 tommo4523

tommo4523

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 27 October 2020 - 05:30 AM

The price is starting to add up, I expected that astrophotography would be expensive, hence the downgrade in aperture size, but now I am looking at 3500 AUD for a set up, I was hoping for 2000-2500, at this point I have to ask is there any "shortcuts" I can take to reducing total cost, anything that I am doing wrong, my only criteria is that I would like a full setup for DSO, I am not concerned with aperture size but I would like to have a complete kit around the 80mm mark, is there any other setups anyone would reccomend? I am a complete newbie to astrophotography so please forgive my ignorance.

 

Thanks Tom,



#8 the Elf

the Elf

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,884
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 27 October 2020 - 05:43 AM

Massive is a difficult word. In your first image you will have all sorts of problems but nothing related to the optics. The massive improvement is your personal learning curve. Either there comes a time when you say this is no longer good enough or it does not. Hard to tell. Some expect perfection when pixel peeping, others scale the image down to full HD and don't care about a bit fringing. It depends on your expectations.

If you find a modded Canon T3i/600D or a modded Nikon 5100 or 5300 grab it. If you own a DSLR less than 6 or 7 years old, use it. If you want an astro camera a colored one (OSC) is the cheaper way to start with and it will be as good as or better than a modded DSLR. If you want to go into narrow band one fine day you need a mono. The by far most important factor is your level of light pollution. Enter your location in clearoutside.com and let us know what Bortle level it tells you. When it is less than 5 you are fine. If it is more than 8 you have a problem. In between it need patience. Light pollution can be fought by long exposure time but you need 4x the time for 2x the light pollution. If you have access to a dark site the best option is to image there even if home imaging offers a lot more comfort.



#9 RJF-Astro

RJF-Astro

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 680
  • Joined: 13 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Zeist, Netherlands

Posted 27 October 2020 - 05:44 AM

Can you share a list of what you have in mind at this point and the cost? We can then add or remove options. If budget is really important, leave guiding for what it is at this point. Like sg6 says, you can get along without. It is not crucial. The basic setup imo would be:

  • EQ5
  • 80ED with reducer/corrector
  • DSLR or mirrorless with intervalometer and t-ring
  • Bathinov mask
  • Software for post processing (use DeepSkyStacker for calibration and stacking)
  • A good book, like Bracken Deep Sky Imaging Primer

This should get you started. Add other things as you progress, like guiding, dew straps etc, based on your currrent needs.



#10 tommo4523

tommo4523

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 27 October 2020 - 05:53 AM

If you find a modded Canon T3i/600D or a modded Nikon 5100 or 5300 grab it.

By modded do you mean containing all the adapters to hook up to the telescope?

 

The by far most important factor is your level of light pollution. Enter your location in clearoutside.com and let us know what Bortle level it tells you. When it is less than 5 you are fine. If it is more than 8 you have a problem. In between it need patience. Light pollution can be fought by long exposure time but you need 4x the time for 2x the light pollution. If you have access to a dark site the best option is to image there even if home imaging offers a lot more comfort.

I live in a class 5 area

 

Can you share a list of what you have in mind at this point and the cost? We can then add or remove options. If budget is really important, leave guiding for what it is at this point. Like sg6 says, you can get along without. It is not crucial. The basic setup imo would be:

  • EQ5
  • 80ED with reducer/corrector
  • DSLR or mirrorless with intervalometer and t-ring
  • Bathinov mask
  • Software for post processing (use DeepSkyStacker for calibration and stacking)
  • A good book, like Bracken Deep Sky Imaging Primer

This should get you started. Add other things as you progress, like guiding, dew straps etc, based on your currrent needs.

EQ5 with GoTo, 80ED (although upon further inspection I found that the AUD price is quite steep), I know nothing about cameras but people seem to recommend the Nikon D5600 (900 AUD), Astro Essentials 32mm Guide Scope, ZWO ASI120MM Mini guide scope camera, 0.85x reduces (wow they are expensive), I'm basically looking for whatever will provide the most versatility for the 2000-2500 dollar range, second hand IS and option.

 

I am 17 so this sort of thing is pretty expensive for me.


Edited by tommo4523, 27 October 2020 - 06:26 AM.


#11 RJF-Astro

RJF-Astro

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 680
  • Joined: 13 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Zeist, Netherlands

Posted 27 October 2020 - 06:42 AM

Well I can understand that. The 72ED is another option but it looks to be unavailable at Australian vendors, and the same goed for the new SW62ED Evolux. Both are cheaper than the 80ED.

 

I think the general advice when you go cheaper is to look at used, or start with a camera tracker such as the Star Adventurer. The tracker will handle anything up to 200mm. For instance the Rokinon 135mm f/2.0. You are talking about a different field of view though. An advantage is you can be very mobile, and travel to dark skies. This can be very rewarding with wide field RGB, as this is difficult in light pollution.

 

Or you can start with the EQ5 and a camera lens. Or an achromatic refractor. That way you can grow into a (better) telescope while practicing techniques. No easy way out though. Astrophotography is demanding budget wise mostly because of the difficulties in accurate tracking and imaging stars.


Edited by RJF-Astro, 27 October 2020 - 06:43 AM.


#12 bobzeq25

bobzeq25

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 22,031
  • Joined: 27 Oct 2014

Posted 27 October 2020 - 10:05 AM

The price is starting to add up, I expected that astrophotography would be expensive, hence the downgrade in aperture size, but now I am looking at 3500 AUD for a set up, I was hoping for 2000-2500, at this point I have to ask is there any "shortcuts" I can take to reducing total cost, anything that I am doing wrong, my only criteria is that I would like a full setup for DSO, I am not concerned with aperture size but I would like to have a complete kit around the 80mm mark, is there any other setups anyone would reccomend? I am a complete newbie to astrophotography so please forgive my ignorance.

 

Thanks Tom,

This business, long exposure DSO imaging, is simply not inexpensive.  Just an unfortunate fact.  What you save in money by going cheap will cost you in wasted time and frustration.  A lot.  For example, that inexpensive ZWO camera has a tiny chip, tiny field of view, which will make it hard to find things, can't image many targets, and it has about as much noise as a DSLR.  You'd be better off with a used DSLR, with a big chip.  It would work _much_ better.  Any mount can only achieve its potential with guiding, although guiding won't make an inexpensive mount perform like an expensive one.

 

There is an inexpensive workaround.  Trade the scope for a camera lens, with much shorter focal length.  _Then_ you can use an inexpensive mount and no guiding.  The setup looks like this.  Note that the price is for the camera tracker only, the 2nd picture shows you what you get.

 

https://optcorp.com/...ro-full-package

 

This IS a DSO setup.  People make fine images that way.  Examples here.  Note that there are many pages, and this is only one camera tracker of several.  This is a popular way to go.  I have a fine mount, and a few scopes, still use my camera tracker sometimes.

 

https://www.astrobin...ptron skyguider

 

Struggling with a marginal mount (which the EQ5 is) and a scope is nowhere near as much fun.  <smile>  Camera tracker/camera/lens is a great way to start, learn the basic techniques, make some nice images, and see if this is something you really want to do. 

 

This book will take you through the process.  The scope on the cover (sitting on a Sirius/HEQ5 Pro mount, $1200 US, about as cheap a mount as you'd want with a scope) is where it winds up, but it spends a good amount of time with camera/lens.  Starting with just a tripod.

 

https://www.astropix...bgda/index.html

 

The scope, with relatively long focal length, is what makes things expensive, by magnifying tracking errors just as it magnifies subjects.  Just the nature of long exposure imaging, compared to visual astronomy.

 

With a scope, it is never cheap.


Edited by bobzeq25, 27 October 2020 - 10:21 AM.


#13 tommo4523

tommo4523

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 28 October 2020 - 01:10 AM

Thanks everyone, really appreciate the advice it has been a major help, I think I know the road I am going to take now.

 

Tom,



#14 the Elf

the Elf

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,884
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 28 October 2020 - 02:03 AM

Short lesson about modification of a camera. The bare silicon sensor can pick up a wide range of radiation, a lot more than the human eye. The user expects the image to look like what he or she sees in the real world. So if you want to build a photo camera you have to block all light that humans cannot see, ultra violet (the sun burn thing) on the one side and infra red (the heat radiation) on the other. To do so there are filters in front of the sensor. Obviously this is ok for daylight, most people are happy with the selfies that they take on earth. In the universe the most abundant element is hydrogen. When an energy source like a hot star is near the gas begins to glow. You may have heard of the hydrogen Balmer series. The first spectral line is called hydrogen alpha (Ha for short), the second is beta and so on. Ha happens to be at the border of what we can see. It is visible, I have created it in my optics lab and one can clearly see it. You can also look thru a Ha filter and you see red light. As it is near the border of our perception it is no surprise the filter in a camera is starting to block it. So some brands get quite a bit of it, other brands next to nothing. As this color is not important in a daylight scene nobody cares where exactly the cut off is. But astronomers do care! Many beautiful structures glow in this color. So it is common practice to take the camera apart and replace this filter by a different one that lets the Ha pass. That is what you call an astro modded camera. Talented people can DIY, here is a video how to do it:

https://www.youtube....h?v=7huA4R9rXrQ

There are professional services that do it for you. In the CN classifieds you will find a lot of used DSLRs that have been modified before. You must find out if there is a similar platform in Australia.

The mod is for emission nebulae only. Broad band targets like galaxies, star clusters, reflection nebulae, dark clouds, planets, the moon, comets can all be captured with a regular (stock) camera. As a stock camera picks still picks up a little bit very strong emission objects also work. I don't know good examples in your half of the sky. If you see the great Orion nebula or the Rosette nebula, these work without a mod. Dimmer ones benefit a lot from the modification. A dedicated mono astro camera picks up a lot more, even a lot more than a modified DSLR. But that is not recommend for a beginner and does not fit your budget.

 

Astronomers are not the only people who do this kind of modification. There is a small group of daylight photographers that do infrared or ultra violet imaging. In infrared the plants are shiny white that is why IR photos are taken from airplanes to check the condition of a forest. Any dead tree appears dark, healthy trees are white. As opposed to astro mod which is for Ha only these people remove all filters and call it a full spectrum mod. This can be used for astro as well but requires an external filter (L-filter or UV/IR block). Finally very very few people even remove the bayer pattern to make DSLRs mono. It is a risky procedure that almost always ends with a destroyed sensor, so back up from that. I happen to own a full spectrum mono that was converted by a pro. Here is my garden in IR:

 

IR.jpg


Edited by the Elf, 28 October 2020 - 02:06 AM.

  • grozmaistor and RJF-Astro like this

#15 the Elf

the Elf

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,884
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 28 October 2020 - 02:10 AM

You might want to add your location to your profile so that people recommend stores in your part of the world and know that you talk about AUD. It also helps to recommend objects to you. As soon as you have your gear you might want to add it to the signature as most of us do. This helps us to help you.



#16 tommo4523

tommo4523

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 28 October 2020 - 02:54 AM

Elf, thanks for putting in that effort, I do physics and chemistry so I am familiar with the science behind it but had no idea how much that applies to photography, I will definately take all that into account, I have seen people with filter wheels does that provide the same effect as modding the internals of the camera or is that completely different? Does mono make that much of a difference early on, especially with my smaller set up or should I hold out until I have more experience?



#17 the Elf

the Elf

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,884
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 28 October 2020 - 03:54 AM

The cheapest mono plus filter wheel plus (low quality) filters is this set:

http://www.sirius-op...mini-kit-2.html

You also need software to process the data which is not free. For the time being I recommend a DSLR, Nikon and Canon is preferred because there is software available and they are widely used.

Get the book by Charles Bracken and find tons of answers there!



#18 the Elf

the Elf

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,884
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 28 October 2020 - 06:39 AM

This one will do the job:

http://www.australia...slr-hardly-used

or this one:

https://www.gumtree....slr-/1258717038

the grip holds two batteries for longer imaging time. A single battery lasts about 4h in this model.

 

The important consideration is whether or not you want a flip screen. When the scope points upward and you have a fixed screen you have to do gymnastics to see the display. If you decide to hook it to a laptop and use BYEOS or BYnikon to operate the camera you don't need the flip screen. The 600d has got one. I don't know if the Nikon has.


Edited by the Elf, 28 October 2020 - 06:43 AM.


#19 tommo4523

tommo4523

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2020
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 28 October 2020 - 05:09 PM

Okay thank you, I definitely will be going with a DSLR with that sort of price tag, I appreciate the effort, I think I will end up getting exactly what you recommended. 



#20 the Elf

the Elf

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,884
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 29 October 2020 - 02:29 AM

If you go for the Evostar ED80 you need the "Reducer/Corrector (.85x) for Evostar 80" which is threaded onto the scope's draw tube. You need a T-ring that fits the camera you pick. Beware! Most of the T-rings have a 42mm thread towards the scope and only a few come with 48mm. You need the 48mm to fit the reducer. I don't know if the scope comes with a rotator but you can open the dovetail rings a bit and rotate the whole scope in order to change the orientation of the image. You also need a Bahtinov mask for good focus. Depending on your climate you might need a dew strap. Cheap USB strips from Amazon or ok, can be operated with any powerbar. In dry climate you don't need this.

I recommend to start without computer. In that case you need to show the mount three stars so that it can calculate the positions for Goto. To do so you need a finder scope or telrad for coarse adjustment. Fine adjustment is done via the camera screen.

I don't know if the scope is available without all the stuff shown on the skywatcher website or if it always comes with the finder, diagonal and eyepieces. You don't need diagonal and eyepieces for photography, that is for visual only. The included finder will do fine for the goto alignment. If you have some money left to spend you might want a telrad instead which is more intuitive to use. To trigger the camera you need an intervalometer that automatically triggers the number of shots you want with a given time. Make sure the mount comes with a polar scope suitable for the southern pole, i.e. with the Octans engraving. Look here:

https://youtu.be/6JSbB_fInMg?t=963

 

For the first image that is enough complexity in other words do a few unguided images using an exposure time of 30 seconds. When you have a few images and the setup has become second nature add a guide scope, guide camera and laptop for guiding or invest in a stand alone auto guider. Then you can go for longer exposure times and benefit from dither. Image quality will improve a lot.

 

Here is my setup video that includes auto guider setup:

https://www.youtube....h?v=Z9jePIkHjG0

Of course you don't use polaris but Sigma Octantis for polar alignment.


Edited by the Elf, 29 October 2020 - 02:30 AM.



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics