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The last time around for some of us

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#1 grif 678

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 08:45 PM

Hi all

At 70 years old, I know that there are several things I will not see again, like Halley's Comet. And the next time Mars comes close to Earth, I will miss that also. But as the light pollution on earth gets worse every year, some things like dim comets will be harder to see than ever. I do not think it will effect the next time Mars come close, planets are not effected that much by light pollution. So I am hoping for an unknown very bright comet appearing in the near future, maybe that will give some of us older ones a thing to remember in our later years. But as time passes by, I am thankful for being able to view the heavens as much as I have ( which is not as much as lots of you ) but enough to keep my interest.


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#2 kb58

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:09 PM

You may be further down the path than some of us, but while looking at Mars this Fall, it has crossed my mind about how old I'll be the next time around, and wondering what my family situation will be like by then.


Edited by kb58, 27 October 2020 - 09:09 PM.


#3 sunnyday

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:20 PM

in a hundred years someone somewhere is going to say the same thing as you are now.
it may be that once you get to the other side, you can see everything in a different way.

 

it is unfortunately the sad reality, but it is like that for all and all the generations.


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#4 BillP

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:32 PM

Don't bother lamenting or waiting, catch an amazing sight now that you will never ever forget!

 

1 ) Nothing I have viewed through a telescope has come close to rivaling the experience of a total solar eclipse naked eye!  So plan a trip to see one of those!  https://eclipse.gsfc...decade2021.html

  • South Africa during December 2021
  • Central US during April 2024
  • Greenland/Iceland/Spain during August 2026

 

2) Go to a Bortle 1 site that has some altitude to it (maybe 4000' at least) in the US anytime now and be amazed at what a night sky actually looks like where it is so dark that clouds passing overhead are as black as the background sky and the only way you know it is a cloud is that the stars vanish mysteriously in that part of the sky like something is eating them, and there are so many stars that you can't easily find the constellations any more!  And any galaxy is also spectacular to view even in small aperture scopes in those conditions too - M51 in a 90mm scope looked like a photograph with super bright and defined arms; M31 was so bright in the eyepiece that it ruined our dark adaptation!  https://www.cloudyni...xperience-r3067


Edited by BillP, 27 October 2020 - 09:42 PM.

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#5 sunnyday

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:38 PM

Nothing I have viewed through a telescope has come close to rivaling the experience of a total solar eclipse naked eye!  So plan a trip to see one of those!

 

  • South Africa during December 2021
  • Central US during April 2024
  • Greenland/Iceland/Spain during August 2026

 

https://eclipse.gsfc...decade2021.html

Central US during April 2024

 

on my list , from Mexico , Mazatl├ín 


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#6 BillP

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:46 PM

it is unfortunately the sad reality, but it is like that for all and all the generations.

A 100 years from now all you will have to do is take a short vacation to the orbiting dark site for amateur astronomers and you will see things no one has ever witnessed earthbound!  You will wonder how anyone thought earthbound views of the night sky were special in any way.


Edited by BillP, 27 October 2020 - 09:47 PM.

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#7 sunnyday

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:50 PM

A 100 years from now all you will have to do is take a short vacation to the orbiting dark site for amateur astronomers and you will see things no one has ever witnessed earthbound!  You will wonder how anyone thought earthbound views of the night sky were special in any way.

I agree with you bill, but this sentence was meant to be a reality, we all die one day or another.



#8 BillP

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:50 PM

Central US during April 2024

 

on my list , from Mexico , Mazatl├ín 

Great!  Just pick a location in the middle of the track and 8 hours before the event if it looks like it may be cloudy where you are just have the rental car ready to drive to the location where there are no clouds that day (have all the alternate sites mapped out).  Book your hotel a year in advance if the hotel is in the zone. 


Edited by BillP, 27 October 2020 - 09:51 PM.

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#9 BillP

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 09:59 PM

...but this sentence was meant to be a reality, we all die one day or another.

Yes we do, but nothing to lament about IMO.  Way much more to appreciate about the past and the now then to worry about what one can or can't do in some perceived future.  The future, as the world perceives it, is 100% illusion.  So why chase ghosts when you have all this wonderfulness right here in front of you to enjoy, even if it the last day!


Edited by BillP, 27 October 2020 - 10:03 PM.

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#10 bobzeq25

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 10:19 PM

Great!  Just pick a location in the middle of the track and 8 hours before the event if it looks like it may be cloudy where you are just have the rental car ready to drive to the location where there are no clouds that day (have all the alternate sites mapped out).  Book your hotel a year in advance if the hotel is in the zone. 

And book with a national chain.  The last solar eclipse some people (don't know how many, but it wasn't exceptional) who "saved" by booking an independent motel got an email a couple of weeks before their reserved date.  "Your $100 room is now $400.  Do you still want it?"  What are you going to do, hire a lawyer? 

 

The national chains won't do that, the money is not worth the adverse publicity.  I did note that someone who came in without reservations the day before the eclipse was quoted prices 3-4X what I had gotten the room for several months earlier.  Fair enough.


Edited by bobzeq25, 27 October 2020 - 10:20 PM.


#11 Escape Pod

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 10:49 PM

This was fantastic. Thanks for sharing the dark sky read. 
 

As I patiently wait for clear skies and first light, my planning has taught me just how much of the night sky I have to look forward to as the seasons do their dance. Then being able to see these objects again for the first time under such great seeing conditions...
 

 

Don't bother lamenting or waiting, catch an amazing sight now that you will never ever forget!

 

1 ) Nothing I have viewed through a telescope has come close to rivaling the experience of a total solar eclipse naked eye!  So plan a trip to see one of those!  https://eclipse.gsfc...decade2021.html

  • South Africa during December 2021
  • Central US during April 2024
  • Greenland/Iceland/Spain during August 2026

 

2) Go to a Bortle 1 site that has some altitude to it (maybe 4000' at least) in the US anytime now and be amazed at what a night sky actually looks like where it is so dark that clouds passing overhead are as black as the background sky and the only way you know it is a cloud is that the stars vanish mysteriously in that part of the sky like something is eating them, and there are so many stars that you can't easily find the constellations any more!  And any galaxy is also spectacular to view even in small aperture scopes in those conditions too - M51 in a 90mm scope looked like a photograph with super bright and defined arms; M31 was so bright in the eyepiece that it ruined our dark adaptation!  https://www.cloudyni...xperience-r3067



#12 Rick Runcie

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Posted 28 October 2020 - 12:22 PM

I turned 60 this year this is my 4th most favorable opposition for Northern hemisphere observers. 1st was 15yrs old, 2nd 30, 3rd 45 and now as I'm 60. I'm not sure if I'll be around for the next one so I put most of my energies into this one. I've observed Mars over 30 times in the last 2 months and have sketched it at least 25 times. I make the most of my observing now because I don't know what time will hold in the future. Though I'm planning to see the next 15 year favorable opposition, tomorrow is never guaranteed make the most of today!

#13 Rick Runcie

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Posted 28 October 2020 - 12:23 PM

Oh sorry I guess my age is getting to me that was Mars I was referring to

#14 GeneT

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Posted 28 October 2020 - 02:32 PM

When one hits 70, we have made the big time! In May, i turned 77. What finally got me was night driving on windy roads. Going around curves on two lane roads, I could not see oncoming vehicles. Old age will finally catch up for all of us. About all I can do now is naked eye viewing, which is not all that great from Mag 3 skies. I do some bino viewing, but my favorite hobby is really taken a nose dive.  



#15 Ihtegla Sar

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Posted 28 October 2020 - 05:25 PM

I don't know about the rest of you geezers but I'm planning to live to 150 so I can see the next Venus transit, since I missed the last one. By then all the old folks will have bionic eyes with built in night vision so I will be able to see a lot more DSOs in my light polluted back yard.

Ah well, I can dream at least. Yeah, I lost both of my parents in their mid seventies in the past couple years, so realistically I probably only have about 20 to 25 years left. This knowledge makes it a lot easier for me to spend more money now on better gear, since you can't take it with you.

I was really into astronomy as a kid and young adult (missed the 1979 eclipse due to clouds but saw both comets Hyakutake and Hale Bopp, Nova Cygni 1992, and Comet Shunaker-levy hit Jupiter) but then got caught up in work, family and other hobbies (white water kayaking, mountain biking and rock climbing) demanded my time, so I took a 30 year hiatus from astronomy. Just got back into astronomy a couple years ago after seeing the 2017 eclipse. Now I have to make up for lost time.

In the last 18 months I've seen the Mercury transit, Comet Neowise, and many other things that I either didn't see when I was younger or that I didn't see as well since the gear I have now performs better than what I had when I was younger.
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#16 Jeff B1

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Posted 29 October 2020 - 10:53 AM

During the week of December 1 - 8, 2022 at closest approach Mars will only be 17.2 arcsec, 24% smaller; however, it will be at 25-degrees in declination and higher in the sky then will result in a much more favorable observing than in 2020.  

 

The next time Mars will be at 22 arcsec is in 2033; so you'll be 83 and I'll be 93!  laugh.gif

 

Read this for Mars futures:  https://dustymars.ne..._Info_Mars.html


Edited by Jeff B1, 29 October 2020 - 11:01 AM.

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#17 helpwanted

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Posted 29 October 2020 - 11:58 AM

Just think, 100 years from now someone will search and find this thread in the archives! 


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#18 BillP

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Posted 01 November 2020 - 08:51 AM

Just think, 100 years from now someone will search and find this thread in the archives! 

lol.gif .... Unlikely. bawling.gif 




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