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Jupiter and Saturn to collide this year!

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#26 chrysalis

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Posted 07 November 2020 - 03:03 PM

How high above the horizon do you see from NC at 34* right after sunset?

Aha! Use this site to generate your sky at the tine you want from your location and thge cursor can be hovered over Jupiter to get the answer!

 

https://theskylive.com/

 

For me, it is about 8° elevation at 5 PM.



#27 grif 678

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Posted 08 November 2020 - 06:54 PM

They will probably be very close to the horizon as it gets dark, so may have to find a flat area with no trees.



#28 REC

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Posted 18 November 2020 - 01:13 PM

They will probably be very close to the horizon as it gets dark, so may have to find a flat area with no trees.

About 10 degrees they say. Need a low flat horizon.



#29 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 01:56 AM

Here are two iPhone shots that I took early Saturday night.  The two gas giant planets were approximately 2.5 degrees apart at the time.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Jupiter and Saturn iPhone 11-29-20 FB1.jpg
  • Jupiter and Saturn iPhone 11-29-20 FB2.jpg

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#30 Marty0750

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 07:56 AM

The Jupiter-Saturn conjunction cycle has an interesting rhythm. I ran a computer search over a span of 4,500 years from years -1500 to +3000, or 276 close approaches to see what came up. In the graph below each point shows the closest separations between the two planets over the 276 conjunctions. They vary from about 1.5 arc minutes to 80 arc minutes. Most close approaches while eye catching are not remarkable. Out of the 276 conjunctions only seventeen came to within the range of this December's separation.

 

Jupiter and Saturn catch up with each other every 20 years and every 60 years are especially close. Last  one was 1961 when they approached to 14.7 arc minutes apart. This time around on 21 December they will be closer at 6.1 arc minutes. Sixty years on in 2080 they are a tad closer at 6.0 arc minutes apart.

 

The closest approach of all during the entire span occurred on -423 December 28 when the two planets were only 1.5 arc minutes apart. Only the keen sighted might have been able to split them.  It is not until 2874 December 25 do they once more make and eye-challenging conjunction at 2.3 arc minutes apart.

 

 

Jup--Sat sep cycles-web.jpg

 

 

 

Martin


Edited by Marty0750, 29 November 2020 - 09:38 AM.

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#31 ButterFly

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 12:33 PM

Take a look at Venus and Jupiter as well.  Venus will transit Jupiter on Nov 22, 2065, at under 8 degrees elongation from the sun.  I may live that long, only to go blind trying!

 

You may find the following papers interesting:

 

Meeus, Mutual Occultations of Planets; and,

Watson, Simultaneous Lunar Occultations of Two Planets.

 

It's so much easier to do this now rather than with punchcards, or worse, quill pen.


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#32 REC

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Posted 01 December 2020 - 01:48 PM

The Jupiter-Saturn conjunction cycle has an interesting rhythm. I ran a computer search over a span of 4,500 years from years -1500 to +3000, or 276 close approaches to see what came up. In the graph below each point shows the closest separations between the two planets over the 276 conjunctions. They vary from about 1.5 arc minutes to 80 arc minutes. Most close approaches while eye catching are not remarkable. Out of the 276 conjunctions only seventeen came to within the range of this December's separation.

 

Jupiter and Saturn catch up with each other every 20 years and every 60 years are especially close. Last  one was 1961 when they approached to 14.7 arc minutes apart. This time around on 21 December they will be closer at 6.1 arc minutes. Sixty years on in 2080 they are a tad closer at 6.0 arc minutes apart.

 

The closest approach of all during the entire span occurred on -423 December 28 when the two planets were only 1.5 arc minutes apart. Only the keen sighted might have been able to split them.  It is not until 2874 December 25 do they once more make and eye-challenging conjunction at 2.3 arc minutes apart.

 

 

attachicon.gifJup--Sat sep cycles-web.jpg

 

 

 

Martin

What's an arc minute vs degrees? I know the with of the moon is 30* and just fits in most of my scopes with a low power eyepiece with some space around it.



#33 John Fitzgerald

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Posted 01 December 2020 - 01:56 PM

What's an arc minute vs degrees? I know the with of the moon is 30* and just fits in most of my scopes with a low power eyepiece with some space around it.

One degree of arc contains 60 arc minutes.



#34 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 01 December 2020 - 02:36 PM

Jupiter and Saturn easily fit into the 3.1-degree true field of view produced by my 80mm f/5 Orion ShortTube refractor and a 25mm Orion Plössl yesterday evening.


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#35 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 01 December 2020 - 09:21 PM

Here's a hand-held afocal iPhone shot of Jupiter and Saturn from yesterday.  The two gas giants were about 2.2 degrees apart at the time.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Jupiter and Saturn ST80 Moon 11-30-20 IMG_9622 Processed Cropped Rotated Resized CN.jpg

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#36 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 02 December 2020 - 02:49 PM

Here's the section on Jupiter and Saturn from the December Celestial Calendar.

https://www.cloudyni.../#entry10693902

Jupiter and Saturn are 2.1 degrees apart as December begins and lie within one degree of one another from December 12th through December 29th. During the first week of December, the two planets set by 8:30 p.m. local time. A waxing crescent Moon passes three degrees south of Jupiter and Saturn on the evening of December 16th. On December 21st, the two gas giants are separated by just six arc minutes less 45 minutes after sunset and are positioned about 14 degrees above the southwestern horizon some 30 degrees east of the Sun. On that date, Jupiter shines at magnitude -2.0 and subtends 33.3 arc seconds. Saturn's brightness is magnitude +0.6, its disk has an apparent diameter of 15.4 arc seconds, and its rings span some 35 arc seconds. This is the first conjunction of the two planets since 2000 and the closest conjunction since 1623. The last observable conjunction in which Jupiter and Saturn were closer occurred in 1226. During the conjunction, Ganymede will transit Jupiter. Saturn's satellites Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Titan will be to the west of the planet and Rhea and Mimas to the east. For additional information on this Great Conjunction, see https://earthsky.org...ion-dec-21-2020 and https://earthsky.org...nified-dec-2020 and https://www.timeandd...eat-conjunction


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#37 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 02 December 2020 - 02:58 PM

Low on the horizon for the Virginia area, plus sets by the time it gets dark. On the 20th will only be 15 deg above the horizon at 5:30pm in the SW sky, so about an hour after sunset. In my 4" f/8 the 2 planets AND M74 will all be in the same FOV with a 30XW. With a 5XW (160x) or the 3.5XW (230x), both planets will still be in the same FOV!

Between 1:30-3:00pm though they max out just above 30 degrees so might be better for some daylight observing. Their magnitudes will be 0.6 and -2 so should be doable with a Polarizer+80A filters to darken the background sky.

I'm curious how m74 will be visible with it. Isn't that in pisces closer to Mars?
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#38 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 02 December 2020 - 03:44 PM

Yesterday's episode of StarDate was on the conjunction.

 

https://stardate.org...gram/2020-12-01



#39 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 02 December 2020 - 08:11 PM

I'm curious how m74 will be visible with it. Isn't that in pisces closer to Mars?

That's correct.  It's actually the globular cluster M75, which is about 1.5 degrees south of Jupiter and Saturn on that date.

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  • Jupiter Saturn M75 12-21-20 Stellarium.jpg

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#40 chrysalis

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Posted 03 December 2020 - 04:00 AM

Take a look at Venus and Jupiter as well.  Venus will transit Jupiter on Nov 22, 2065, at under 8 degrees elongation from the sun.  I may live that long, only to go blind trying!

 

You may find the following papers interesting:

 

Meeus, Mutual Occultations of Planets; and,

Watson, Simultaneous Lunar Occultations of Two Planets.

 

It's so much easier to do this now rather than with punchcards, or worse, quill pen.

Occultations Planets2sml.jpg

 

Attached File  Occultations Planets.ppt   317KB   5 downloads


Edited by chrysalis, 03 December 2020 - 04:01 AM.

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#41 aa6ww

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Posted 03 December 2020 - 03:21 PM

Remember  Jupiter is visible in the day time also. I plan to practice finding it in the day time a few days earlier and then on the Big Day, follow it for most of the afternoon and evening. It will look really bad by the time night comes around because it will be so low, so this will make it more fun to observe. Something fun to consider since I have 2 weeks off during the last part of this year.

 

 

https://www.planetar...ter-in-daylight

 

 

 

...Ralph


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#42 chrysalis

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Posted 04 December 2020 - 01:35 PM

Take a look at Venus and Jupiter as well.  Venus will transit Jupiter on Nov 22, 2065, at under 8 degrees elongation from the sun.  I may live that long, only to go blind trying!

 

You may find the following papers interesting:

 

Meeus, Mutual Occultations of Planets; and,

Watson, Simultaneous Lunar Occultations of Two Planets.

 

It's so much easier to do this now rather than with punchcards, or worse, quill pen.

During the 2038 Jupiter-Uranus event, as seen from 36.25°N, 80°W, closest approach is about 4 arc-minutes at 9:14AM EST on 2-19-38. But the two planets are very close for a few days before and after.

 

2-19-2038 914AM EST Jupiter-Uranus Closest.JPG


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#43 chrysalis

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Posted 04 December 2020 - 01:35 PM

Take a look at Venus and Jupiter as well.  Venus will transit Jupiter on Nov 22, 2065, at under 8 degrees elongation from the sun.  I may live that long, only to go blind trying!

 

You may find the following papers interesting:

 

Meeus, Mutual Occultations of Planets; and,

Watson, Simultaneous Lunar Occultations of Two Planets.

 

It's so much easier to do this now rather than with punchcards, or worse, quill pen.

During the 2038 Jupiter-Uranus event, as seen from 36.25°N, 80°W, closest approach is about 4 arc-minutes at 9:14AM EST on 2-19-38. But the two planets are very close for a few days before and after. The little dot between the planets is interloping star TYC1359-00559-1 (Visual Magnitude: 10.16):

 

J2000 RA:   7h27m25.43s   DE:+22°23'23.2"
Date  RA:   7h29m42.12s   DE:+22°18'35.2"

 

From CdC:

 

2-19-2038 914AM EST Jupiter-Uranus Closest.JPG


Edited by chrysalis, 04 December 2020 - 01:38 PM.

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#44 ButterFly

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Posted 04 December 2020 - 03:02 PM

There's a great elongation on that as well.  It's almost near opposition.



#45 TimothyPleiades

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Posted 05 December 2020 - 07:49 PM

Tonight they were both visible in the same field of view at 31x with an 18mm xcel lx in my AT80ED. The rings of Saturn and Titan were both easily seen. Jupiter showed its main cloud bands with difficulty and all 4 Galilean moons were lined up on one side. Sunset was at 5:35 here, and I started observing about 15 minutes after that. 


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#46 chrysalis

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Posted 06 December 2020 - 04:09 AM

They're getting closer!! View from my backyard. They are next to the serendipitously placed shepherd's hook. Click to enlarge.

 

12-5-20 718 PM EST Saturn-Jupiter Etc DSC06287 3050.JPG


Edited by chrysalis, 06 December 2020 - 04:09 AM.

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#47 David E

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Posted 06 December 2020 - 08:37 AM

Here's my battle plan. In central NC it will be close to the horizon but I can hopefully get a good look if no clouds are around. I will use a small scope, probably my 60mm Apo with a Nagler. Two reasons for this; first I'll have to travel from my yard to see it, not far but I don't want to carry bulky equipment. Second, I'll be going after a low power, wide field of view. I can see Jupiter or Saturn at high power any time they are in the sky by themselves. I want to see the surrounding sky as well. Two things to remember: Jupiter is perfectly visible in an 80mm refractor during the day, along with at least two of his moons when viewable. I'm hoping for plenty of darkness around sunset for Saturn as well, I plan on lurking at sunset until Jupiter becomes visible and then start the viewing. Second, I want to see how many of Saturn's moons will be visible. No way I could get the "Six Pack" but maybe two moons at least?


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#48 Jeff B1

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Posted 06 December 2020 - 09:06 AM

Here close to Lake Placid, FL  the conjunction closest point will be around 2329UT Jupiter and Saturn will be in my southwest sky at 15 degrees elevation,  so we'll see it if the sky is clear..  Since my big scopes are stored away maybe I'll get out some binocs and my 6" f/4 and observe it.  Really neat.



#49 dhkaiser

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Posted 06 December 2020 - 09:41 AM

"Jupiter and Saturn to collide this year!"

 

Will there be an explosion?


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#50 MikeBOKC

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Posted 06 December 2020 - 02:35 PM

For those planning on observing the conjunction, it may be worth staying up after the planets slide out of view for the lunar X, which will begin around 9 CST.


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