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Mars by the 1-meter telescope at the Pic-du-Midi observatory

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#1 Thierry Legault

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 04:29 AM

Hello, here is Mars on Oct 30th by the 1-meter telescope at the Pic-du-Midi observatory, French Pyrenees.

I took this image with François Colas, astronomer at the Observatory of Paris. Superb processing by Jean-Luc Dauvergne!

Over 4 nights of continuous monitoring, we had a fair window of seeing during 40 minutes on Oct 30th around 23:15UTC, even if is was not a "great Pic" night.

 

mars-picdumidi-2020-10-30.jpg

 

The rotation of the planet over 40 minutes 

 

http://www.astrophot...244_2316600.gif

 

here are two stereo pairs showing Mars in 3D.

One uses the cross-eyed technique: squint to merge the two globes into one at the center of the frame. A finger or any sharp object in front of your nose can help.

The second one uses the parallel technique. Two rolls of paper or cardboard, held like binoculars, can help to direct each eye towards the corresponding globe (left eye for the left globe, right eye for the right globe).
Then...prepare to land on Mars! smile.gif

 

mars-picdumidi-2020-10-30-2316-stereo-cr

 

mars-picdumidi-2020-10-30-2316-stereo-pa

 

The telescope:

 

mars-picdumidi-telescope_small.jpg

 

And finally a raw video:

 

https://www.youtube....eature=emb_logo

 

smile.gif


Edited by Thierry Legault, 05 November 2020 - 03:14 PM.

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#2 Pointsoflight

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 04:55 AM

Tried the finger thing but my eyes want to uncross to focus on the object.. will need to practice 😄
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#3 R Botero

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 05:53 AM

Incredible Thierry!  Thank you for sharing these.  It's like being in orbit cool.gif  I can see a ZWO camera being used; which one?  What was the effective focal length/resolution of the instrument?

 

Great images.

 

Roberto


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#4 Thierry Legault

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 06:43 AM

Incredible Thierry!  Thank you for sharing these.  It's like being in orbit cool.gif  I can see a ZWO camera being used; which one?  What was the effective focal length/resolution of the instrument?

 

Great images.

 

Roberto

 

thank you Roberto! The focal length at prime Cassegrain focus is 17,5m. We used a 224MC for both RGB and IR680 (where the Bayer matrix is quite transparent), sampling being 0.045"/pix. We tried a 290MM later but the seeing was bad.


Edited by Thierry Legault, 05 November 2020 - 06:43 AM.

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#5 Helvetios

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 07:38 AM

Truly fantastic! I need one of these telescopes and the location. wink.gif By the way, I see that the blue haze must be real as it rotates with the planet.  In my own images I was thinking it might be an RGB processing artifact.  It looks like it sublimates as it receives more sunlight during the Martian day and then forms again at the end of the day.


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#6 John_K

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 07:46 AM

Outstanding. Aperture and seeing are definitely king. Love how the ZWO camera (174mm?) is dwarfed by the rear tube assembly of the telescope! 



#7 PirateMike

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 08:01 AM

Where did the pictures go? I see nothing!

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

 

.



#8 Thierry Legault

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 08:13 AM

Truly fantastic! I need one of these telescopes and the location. wink.gif By the way, I see that the blue haze must be real as it rotates with the planet.  In my own images I was thinking it might be an RGB processing artifact.  It looks like it sublimates as it receives more sunlight during the Martian day and then forms again at the end of the day.

 

yes they are real, they appear mostly at (martian) sunrise



#9 ZielkeNightsky

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 11:15 AM

Great photo. Really incredible.

 

But I do not understand why you mix IR in the luminans?


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#10 JMP

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 01:33 PM

For some reason the jpg's don't open for me, but the gif is stunning!!! Thank you for posting this truly wonderful image!!!

Seems my chrome browser doesn't like the jpg's. MS Edge is OK.

Edited by JMP, 05 November 2020 - 03:48 PM.

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#11 Kiwi Paul

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 02:01 PM

Fantastic!!
Paul
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#12 joe nastasi

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 02:18 PM

Thierry,

 

just amazing. 

Can you tell what mars looks like visually through the eyepiece with that telescope?

 

Joe


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#13 Thierry Legault

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 05:22 PM

Great photo. Really incredible.

 

But I do not understand why you mix IR in the luminans?

 

basically, IR gives luminance and RGB chrominance. In this case, there were a mix of RGB and IR for luminance.



#14 Thierry Legault

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 05:24 PM

Thierry,

 

just amazing. 

Can you tell what mars looks like visually through the eyepiece with that telescope?

 

Joe

 

It was bright and nice, although I did not see as many details as there are on the picture



#15 Ittaku

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Posted 05 November 2020 - 05:42 PM

Super images, thanks for sharing!


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#16 troyt

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Posted 06 November 2020 - 05:42 AM

Excellent images and good team effort. waytogo.gif

I have seen a lot of good planetary images come out of Pic-du-Midi observatory over the years the seeing there must be excellent at times and by the way can you rate the seeing for that image?

 

I know Brazil and the Chilean Andes area (Chilescope location) gets good seeing also but I'm not sure if the seeing is as good as Pic-du-Midi location but then again you have to go to Pic-du-Midi observatory

and this is on my bucket list - one day. smile.gif

 

Ps the animation is fantastic and very little difference in seeing conditions over that period which surprised me a little.laugh.gif


Edited by troyt, 06 November 2020 - 05:47 AM.

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#17 Thierry Legault

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Posted 06 November 2020 - 05:49 AM

Excellent images and good team effort. waytogo.gif

I have seen a lot of good planetary images come out of Pic-du-Midi observatory over the years the seeing there must be excellent at times and by the way can you rate the seeing for that image?

 

difficult to say (I don't go so often to the observatory), perhaps 6/10. For each 2-min video (12000 frames at 100fps), in AS3 we took only 5% of the frames, and the difference with 10% sampling was visible. No doubt that the telescope can do better.

Over 4 nights of continous monitoring, we had only that fair window of 40 min. The rest of the time, southern wind gave mediocre seeing, although in fall the seeing is sometimes very good (but not that time).

In addition, we used an IR680 filter for luminance, maybe an IR640 or IR610 would have given something better, but we'll never know! smile.gif  It's amazing to see how shifting to long wavelengths stabilizes and improves the image in presence of turbulence (despite the reduction of resolution)


Edited by Thierry Legault, 06 November 2020 - 05:51 AM.

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#18 ZielkeNightsky

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Posted 06 November 2020 - 07:17 AM

basically, IR gives luminance and RGB chrominance. In this case, there were a mix of RGB and IR for luminance.

I know that. But you end up with an image that is not at all true. You have data from way up the IR area with a longpass filter, not just near red IR data. Far from what Mars looked like at the time of recording in the visual spectrum. That's what I don't understand. Basically you have taken an a wide band IR image and colourized it or?

Still it is a very impressive IR/RGB image
 




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