Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Mars 2020-11-14 - The dust storm is still there!

planet observing report
  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 BQ Octantis

BQ Octantis

    Skylab

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 4,022
  • Joined: 29 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Red Centre, Oz

Posted 14 November 2020 - 05:44 PM

I spent a little extra time at the eyepiece before imaging last night. The dust storm appears as a bright, thick streak across the equator. The structure of the disk is defined by the bright filaments of the dust storm vice the normal darker blobs of surface features. While I don't filter at the eyepiece, my camera certainly filters—here's a toggle on the 1-sol changes in R G and B:

 

apngb-animated.png

 

It looks like the major westward shovel-loads headed south, and now thinner, more wide-spread clouds are heading west…

 

BQ


  • Special Ed, Illinois, Asbytec and 10 others like this

#2 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,940
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 14 November 2020 - 06:09 PM

Very nice work capturing the animation of a cool event, BQ.



#3 BQ Octantis

BQ Octantis

    Skylab

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 4,022
  • Joined: 29 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Red Centre, Oz

Posted 14 November 2020 - 06:26 PM

Thanks Norme!

 

Amazingly enough, I was able to get 4 nights of captures in my cloud + dust storm season:

 

post-273658-0-46839000-1605393124.png

 

But it's clouds from here on out…

 

BQ


Edited by BQ Octantis, 14 November 2020 - 06:29 PM.

  • Illinois, R Botero, happylimpet and 2 others like this

#4 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,940
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 14 November 2020 - 06:35 PM

Amazing enough, indeed. I wish I could have seen some of it during our nearly unprecedented pounding of 5 typhoons. Hopefully the finale of our monsoon season. Seems many folks dislike Martian storms. You make them look nice.

Edited by Asbytec, 14 November 2020 - 06:36 PM.

  • Astroman007 likes this

#5 BQ Octantis

BQ Octantis

    Skylab

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 4,022
  • Joined: 29 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Red Centre, Oz

Posted 14 November 2020 - 07:07 PM

Seems many folks dislike Martian storms. You make them look nice.

Thanks for the kind words, Norme! smile.gif

 

Global dust storms make for a very difficult Mars, especially for beginners (speaking from my 2018 imaging experience). But watching this storm progression is like watching a slow-motion video from the Holi festival in New Delhi.

 

BQ


Edited by BQ Octantis, 14 November 2020 - 09:11 PM.

  • Asbytec likes this

#6 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,092
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 15 November 2020 - 12:51 PM

A global storm can be an unfortunate occurrence but these local and regional (or planet encircling) storms are fascinating to watch unfold.  And they can allow us to see, albeit indirectly or by inference, features that would ordinarily be beyond detection visually or only in images by the most talented imagers.  Seeing the dust blow down Valles Marineris is an example of what I mean.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: planet, observing report



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics