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Pleiades nebulosity?

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#26 Sheol

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Posted 27 November 2020 - 07:40 PM

        Yes, that was what I saw in my telescope. Good sketch! Those are on exceptional nights here. But I thought I was talking about the dust clouds the Pleiades are passing through is the same thing, since the nebula is reflection only ( to my knowledge anyway). But back in the days of subdivisions not in big cities or inside townships in the 70s before the explosion of LP when I looked up at M.45 it always looked like a cloud with stars inside it. 

 

 

       Clear Skies,

         Matt.


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#27 Achernar

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 09:39 AM

        Yes, that was what I saw in my telescope. Good sketch! Those are on exceptional nights here. But I thought I was talking about the dust clouds the Pleiades are passing through is the same thing, since the nebula is reflection only ( to my knowledge anyway). But back in the days of subdivisions not in big cities or inside townships in the 70s before the explosion of LP when I looked up at M.45 it always looked like a cloud with stars inside it. 

 

 

       Clear Skies,

         Matt.

I never saw the nebulosity unless I went to very dark sites. I've even managed to see the Horsehead from light polluted areas because I used a H-beta filter and a large telescope, but large apertures and filters will not work on the Pleiades nebulosity. Only dark, clear skies do, which is why from a very dark site even a small telescope will reveal it.

 

Taras


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#28 Sheol

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 07:41 PM

          Well, maybe not. But back in those days it was easy to see the Milky Way & M. 31 & M.42 by naked eye. I suppose, since I'm light sensitive, but not good at focus ( my eyes I mean. Nearsighted with a focus problem in my left eye) that I was actually seeing a lot of dimmer stars just blended together.

 

    Matt.



#29 Keith Rivich

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 08:53 PM

Funny...as much observing as I do on really faint objects I have never found the nebulosity around M45 easy. Most times I can't see it. Even under the best of conditions. Not sure why. I suppose it just doesn't ring the bell for me.

 

What I have seen, tucked just next to Merope, is IC349. A triangular wisp of nothingness nearly lost in the glare of the much brighter Merope. 


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#30 Sheol

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 08:22 PM

                Which is why I was shocked to see some of it around the brighter stars when I turned my 8 inch Dob on it. I wasn't even going to bother, since the the OC is too big to rewarding in the FOV of my scope & the (then) current EPs that came with it.

 

      Clear Skies,

          Matt



#31 curiousastro

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Posted 01 December 2020 - 04:31 PM

I seriously doubt what you saw was actually the dust clouds the Pleiades are passing through, but scattered light instead. The nebulosity is only visible from dark sites while the sky is clear and the moon absent. You could have seen the individual concentrations of interstellar dust with your telescope under those conditions. The drawing below was made at the 2016 Okie-Tex Starparty under very dark skies.

 

Taras

Achernar's sketch is fantastic. The Merope nebula should be the one you are targeting given that it is the easiest and you are working with less than ideal conditions. The first time I saw it was when I focused on the "extension" of the nebula out and away from Merope and towards the ~magnitude 8 star in Archenar's sketch  

 

Binoculars usually provide a better context for seeing these type of nebula- more sky with which you can compare the "edge" of what you think might be the nebula. You will also need a fairly dark sky the first time you go for it.

 

That being said, once you catch the Merope nebula, it can be seen in more challenging conditions.



#32 Sheol

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Posted 02 December 2020 - 08:17 PM

               Yes, then its the other bits of fluff that are the real challenge. But it seems to depend on a list of variables here: clarity, good seeing, calm winds, etc.

 

   Matt.




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