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meaning of degree in IS binoculars?

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#1 edwincjones

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Posted 23 November 2020 - 07:09 AM

maybe a dumb question,

but what is the meaning of degree  of stabilization in IS binoculars?

some have 1 or 2 degree, others 5-6

bigger seems better-sometimes but not always

please define the meaning of degree in IS stabilization

 

question.gif

 

thanks,

edj


Edited by edwincjones, 23 November 2020 - 07:13 AM.


#2 cnuser

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Posted 23 November 2020 - 08:21 AM

Hello!
IS bins with only a few degrees of stabilization reduce your human micro tremor / micro shaking handheld. IS with more degrees can be also or better used e.g. on boats with larger movements. Or in strong wind. Some IS bins therefore have switches for 2 levels of stabilization, low level stabilization only probably saves energy, batteries hold longer or/and can be technically better designed for the corresponding observation situation - with situation special (low level) shaking.

Best regards, CS.

 

Edit:

Shaking on boats or in wind has lower frequencies but greater amplitudes then micro tremor of the human hands only. This interference must stabilization control handle different to micro movements of hands only. 2 levels are good or simpler for the design of IS-algorithm, for feedback regulation (control loop) of very different disturbance signals (shaking).


Edited by cnuser, 23 November 2020 - 10:42 AM.

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#3 Mark9473

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Posted 23 November 2020 - 10:19 AM

Ed, I think it's how far you can point away from the target for the IS mechanism to still correct that motion.



#4 ihf

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Posted 23 November 2020 - 10:21 AM

For Canon binoculars the value is typically between 0.7 and 1 degree or about 10-20% of the field of view. Lower magnification binos usually have higher values, as the stabilization happens before the eyepiece. In practice tt means one can shake about a good moon diameter while keeping the view fixed. If more, the view will start drifting/swaying. The new 10-14x32 binos all supposedly have 1 degree of stabilization. Don't know why this doesn't change with magnification. What this value doesn't provide is how pleasantly the shaking is reduced. There still can be micro movements like the Canon 15/18x50 IS. Or the transition above the stabilization threshold when accelerating the movement to "catch up" can feel jerky/bad on the eye or more smooth/pleasant. In general the 10x42IS and 10-14x32 IS have more eye friendly/smooth stabilization.



#5 edwincjones

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Posted 23 November 2020 - 11:12 AM

Ed, I think it's how far you can point away from the target for the IS mechanism to still correct that motion.

seems reasonable and easy to understand

 

For Canon binoculars the value is typically between 0.7 and 1 degree or about 10-20% of the field of view. ...........

about the same amount

 

thanks,

edj




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