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Your Best " I can't believe that's visible" in Binoculars Moments?

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#26 BrooksObs

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Posted 11 December 2020 - 11:12 AM

I was most surprised seeing the full extent of the California Nebula with just 10x50 binocs, totally without any filters, right from my backyard some years ago..

 

BrooksObs


Edited by BrooksObs, 11 December 2020 - 11:12 AM.

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#27 SNH

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Posted 16 December 2020 - 11:05 PM

I was most surprised seeing the full extent of the California Nebula with just 10x50 binocs, totally without any filters, right from my backyard some years ago..

 

BrooksObs

Yeah, I've seen it most of it in my 7x35s from my backyard.

 

Scott


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#28 litesong

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Posted 17 December 2020 - 07:24 AM

I'm always amazed to see smoke trails from meteors in my 10x50s. Coolest thing ever.

Never seen too many meteor smoke trails. Once tho, at the Oregon State Star Party in the’90’s with Celestron 20x80mm Giants on a tripod, I was able to get on the track of a long enduring meteor as it burned out. Lots of people ooh’d & ah’d over that one. I hollered out that I could see the smoke trail & people came out of the dark to see through my  binoculars. After 5 minutes of “fame”, people returned to their own scopes. After 10 minutes, I shouted out I could still see the smoke trail. People shouted back, “No you can’t”. But, people came out of the dark again to view thru my binocs, then went away again. After 20 minutes, I hollered again that I could still see the smoke trail, but no one came out of the dark to see. I continued to watch the smoke trail till the 25+Minute mark, till my eyes started watering, trying to see nothing.


Edited by litesong, 17 December 2020 - 07:25 AM.

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#29 litesong

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Posted 17 December 2020 - 10:04 PM

Not a surprising view, but observing M81 & M82 galaxies with my 20x80mm  binoculars, I never considered my observation done, if I did NOT include galaxies NGC 2976 & 3077, all in the same view.



#30 BrooksObs

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Posted 18 December 2020 - 12:02 AM

Never seen too many meteor smoke trails. Once tho, at the Oregon State Star Party in the’90’s with Celestron 20x80mm Giants on a tripod, I was able to get on the track of a long enduring meteor as it burned out. Lots of people ooh’d & ah’d over that one. I hollered out that I could see the smoke trail & people came out of the dark to see through my  binoculars. After 5 minutes of “fame”, people returned to their own scopes. After 10 minutes, I shouted out I could still see the smoke trail. People shouted back, “No you can’t”. But, people came out of the dark again to view thru my binocs, then went away again. After 20 minutes, I hollered again that I could still see the smoke trail, but no one came out of the dark to see. I continued to watch the smoke trail till the 25+Minute mark, till my eyes started watering, trying to see nothing.

 

Yes, they can be very impressive if they encounter a region of very high winds aloft. I've seen more than a few over the years. Most commonly, once they appear you can see them move rapidly off in whatever high altitude wind takes them. But there are those rare ones that simultaneously encounter different wind velocities at different altitudes and seem to writhe and change shape almost moment-to-moment like some manner of celestial snake! Then there are some that do this same sort dance, but in slow motion if the trail should last for an extended period.

 

BrooksObs


Edited by BrooksObs, 18 December 2020 - 12:03 AM.

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#31 kurtenstein

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Posted 27 December 2020 - 09:31 PM

I think recently, comet Neowise surprised me in my 10x50 binos.  Not that I could see it, but how WELL I could see it.  It filled the field of view with a dazzling nucleus and tail that stretched forever.

Same here! I first saw it in my 10x50s from just outside my house. I live in Montreal, population 1.78 million! That's a lot of light pollution. 



#32 *skyguy*

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 09:31 PM

In my case, it's not that "I can't believe that's visible" but, "I can't believe the whole thing is visible."

 

For many years I've been frustrated that I could only see the open cluster, called Melotte 111 or the Coma Star Cluster in its entire, 8.5º span using only small, wide-field, low magnification binoculars ...  nice, but not stunning. However, the cluster looked spectacular in 10x50 (6.5º) binoculars, but only parts could be seen at a time and I needed to scan around to view all of it.

 

I finally broke down and purchased the Vixen Ascot 10x50 Superwide Binoculars (8.5º). The first object I looked at was the Coma Star Cluster and it was truly magnificent. It fit entirely in binoculars FOV and the stars were .... blazing ... and the inverted "V" was easily seen. This was one of those rare ... "Oh, WOW! ... moments.

 

These binoculars were worth every penny I paid for them. Even if only for seeing the entire Coma Star Cluster as it should be seen.

 

Mel 111.jpg

 

 


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#33 wrvond

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 10:43 PM

Whenever I sit down at the Monster parallelogram with my 28x110’s:

 

https://m.youtube.co...h?v=oALxLNOhI6I



#34 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 December 2020 - 02:32 AM

I've logged M74 with my 15x70s from Cherry Springs State Park but haven't had any success so far with the Canon IS 15x50s that my wife and I purchased earlier this year.  I haven't been to a good dark site since August but will certainly try if things ever get back to some semblance of normal. 

I have been rather surprised that I've been able to see M33 from my light-polluted front yard on a couple of occasions with the 15x50s.



#35 Sheol

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Posted 29 December 2020 - 07:51 PM

             OMG. Dave! bow.gif bow.gif  You are my Icon now. LOL Seriously, M.74? M.33 I believe would not be hard in the right conditions, but M.74? It took me 3 years to see it in an 8 inch telescope. This is where experience counts & it shows.

 

          Clear Skies,

               Matt.



#36 Fiske

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Posted 30 December 2020 - 11:06 PM

Sort of a break through moment for me with binoculars happened in September of 2000. I was staying in the Ozarks at a lake front house that had been in our family for a generation. It was Labor Day weekend and the Lake was busy, needless to say with an amazing amount of dock lights, partiers, etc. Looking for a place away from all the noise and lights, I went driving around back roads (gravel roads) and noticed this weather beaten sign that said "Old Silvey Cemetery" pointing up a weed choked and tree cramped road. Really not that much more than a track. But I was on a mission so up I went driving a GMC pickup. :-)

 

Sure enough, there was a nice clearing in front of the cemetery gate with a reasonable amount of sky so I set up. It was atmospheric once darkness fell, to say the least, with faded old headstones glimmering in the starlight. I'm not making this up. It was about a year after The Blair Witch Project was released. lol

 

Anyway, two of the items on my observing list were NGC 6939 and 6946, an OC in Cepheus and a GX on the border between Cepheus and Cygnus, only about 2/3rds of a degree apart. Really a fine duo. The OC is about 4000 LY distant while the GX is about 10 million. I had observed them for the first time only a few weeks before at the club's Louisburg observatory, which is not a really dark site, and they had been dim in the 9.25 inch Celestron SCT I was using then. 

 

My practice was to scout a field out with the binoculars to make it easer to find objects in the telescope. At the Old Silvey site I was amazed to find that I could actually see both the cluster and the galaxy with 10x50 binoculars. Here is a comment from my journal, dated September 3, 2000: "Amazingly, these two objects are readily observable in binoculars! They appear as faint patches of nebulosity fairly near one another but still separated by open starfield."

 

Fiske


Edited by Fiske, 30 December 2020 - 11:58 PM.

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