Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Sunrise at Clavius & Tycho

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 airscottdenning

airscottdenning

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 438
  • Joined: 22 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 28 November 2020 - 03:08 PM

Rugged craters upon craters in the southern highlands of the Moon. The biggest one here is Clavius. It's about 230 km across or roughly the size of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island combined.

 

Clavius is very old. It was formed nearly 4 billion years ago by a gigantic impact and is one of the biggest craters on the Moon that wasn't later flooded by lava to become a "sea." Just last month, NASA announced the discovery of water trapped in tiny glass beads all over the surface of Clavius. I like the way the smaller craters trace out a graceful arc along the floor of the huge crater.

 

The smaller but very round crater near the bottom of the photo is Tycho, which is about 40x younger than Clavius -- only 108 million years. It's about 50 miles across and more than 15,000 feet deep! There's a big mountain range in the center that was formed by the rebound ("splash!") of lunar crust immediately after the impact.

 

Sunrise on the Moon is amazing! There's no air so the shadows are absolutely black without a hint of dawn until the moment the sun slips suddenly over the mountains. The lunar day is 29 Earth-days long, so the shadows creep slowly across the plains over a period of many hours.

 

The Moon keeps just its one face toward the Earth, so from the Moon the Earth never rises or sets -- it just hangs almost motionless in one place in the sky as the Sun and stars wheel slowly past. The enormous blue/white/green/brown Earth marble spins endlessly against the black velvet vacuum surrounded by the eternal stars. It goes through phases (new, half, full, etc) but never moves from its fixed point in the sky.

 

Clavius was the location of the lunar base from which astronauts in the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" traveled to see the mysterious monolith which had just been excavated in Tycho. When sunlight first touched the monolith it sent out a loud radio signal to alert aliens near Jupiter and led to the crazy "open the pod-bay doors Hal" journey later in the film. 

 

buhhh ... buhhh ... buhhh.    BAH-BUM!

 

This is a stack of 200 x 0.1 sec exposures (best of 1000) through a C8edgeHD with a focal length of 2040 mm. I'm very much enjoying my new three-volume book "Luna Cognita," as you can easily tell!

 

A wonderful pandemic hobby.

Attached Thumbnails

  • small.jpg
  • small.labeled.jpg
  • small.monolith.jpg

Edited by airscottdenning, 29 November 2020 - 11:38 AM.

  • davidmcgo, Kenny V., payner and 16 others like this

#2 jerobe

jerobe

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 744
  • Joined: 08 Dec 2017
  • Loc: Southeast Texas

Posted 28 November 2020 - 03:28 PM

Fine image.  And thanks for the surface feature labels and all the additional information!  I will have to check out those books you mentioned.



#3 fallenstarseven

fallenstarseven

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 79
  • Joined: 25 Aug 2020
  • Loc: San Mateo, CA, USA

Posted 28 November 2020 - 03:29 PM

Love posts like this, thank you.



#4 Benschop

Benschop

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 81
  • Joined: 12 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Eastern Ontario

Posted 01 December 2020 - 10:14 PM

Nice images and enjoyed your write-up also. Which camera did you use to acquire the raw data?



#5 airscottdenning

airscottdenning

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 438
  • Joined: 22 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 01 December 2020 - 11:55 PM

Nice images and enjoyed your write-up also. Which camera did you use to acquire the raw data?

Thank you! This was with a tiny ASI290mini (basically a guide camera) on my Edge8HD at f/11. Shot 1000 frames of video and processed in PlanetarySystemStacker on an iMac.



#6 Stefano Delmonte

Stefano Delmonte

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 146
  • Joined: 17 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Salou (Spain) & Broni (Italy)

Posted 02 December 2020 - 04:16 PM

Nice image and yes I agree with all you wrote, especially with the wonderful hobby, I appreciate the labels on craters.

 

By the way did you see such a weird name has the crater close to Clavius and Schiener? Blancanus!ohmy.gif lol.gif

 

It's an awful traduction to latin from the italian surname Biancani!

 

Sorry for the dissertation.

 

Ste



#7 cpsTN

cpsTN

    Mercury-Atlas

  • ***--
  • Posts: 2,791
  • Joined: 26 Apr 2007
  • Loc: Rutherford Co, Tennessee

Posted 17 December 2020 - 03:22 PM

Rugged craters upon craters in the southern highlands of the Moon. The biggest one here is Clavius. It's about 230 km across or roughly the size of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island combined.

 

Clavius is very old. It was formed nearly 4 billion years ago by a gigantic impact and is one of the biggest craters on the Moon that wasn't later flooded by lava to become a "sea." Just last month, NASA announced the discovery of water trapped in tiny glass beads all over the surface of Clavius. I like the way the smaller craters trace out a graceful arc along the floor of the huge crater.

 

The smaller but very round crater near the bottom of the photo is Tycho, which is about 40x younger than Clavius -- only 108 million years. It's about 50 miles across and more than 15,000 feet deep! There's a big mountain range in the center that was formed by the rebound ("splash!") of lunar crust immediately after the impact.

 

Sunrise on the Moon is amazing! There's no air so the shadows are absolutely black without a hint of dawn until the moment the sun slips suddenly over the mountains. The lunar day is 29 Earth-days long, so the shadows creep slowly across the plains over a period of many hours.

 

The Moon keeps just its one face toward the Earth, so from the Moon the Earth never rises or sets -- it just hangs almost motionless in one place in the sky as the Sun and stars wheel slowly past. The enormous blue/white/green/brown Earth marble spins endlessly against the black velvet vacuum surrounded by the eternal stars. It goes through phases (new, half, full, etc) but never moves from its fixed point in the sky.

 

Clavius was the location of the lunar base from which astronauts in the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" traveled to see the mysterious monolith which had just been excavated in Tycho. When sunlight first touched the monolith it sent out a loud radio signal to alert aliens near Jupiter and led to the crazy "open the pod-bay doors Hal" journey later in the film. 

 

buhhh ... buhhh ... buhhh.    BAH-BUM!

 

This is a stack of 200 x 0.1 sec exposures (best of 1000) through a C8edgeHD with a focal length of 2040 mm. I'm very much enjoying my new three-volume book "Luna Cognita," as you can easily tell!

 

A wonderful pandemic hobby.

These are really nice. The name of the larger crater within Clavius is Rutherfurd, with a U, not the traditional O. I notice this all the time because I live in Rutherford County, Tennessee. Keep up the good work.


  • John_Moore likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics