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Night Vision Tips and Tricks

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#26 JAC8

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 12:44 PM

How well does a 7nm H-alpha filter showibjects like Barnard's loop in NV 1x views?

Can anyone give an idea of the umprovements of going from 7nm to 5nm and then to 3nm?

I have used the 3nm, so I know how awesome that is with NV 1x.

I've seen posts where 5nm works well also. But will 7nm provide a good view from a dark site?



#27 GOLGO13

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 01:33 PM

How well does a 7nm H-alpha filter showibjects like Barnard's loop in NV 1x views?
Can anyone give an idea of the umprovements of going from 7nm to 5nm and then to 3nm?
I have used the 3nm, so I know how awesome that is with NV 1x.
I've seen posts where 5nm works well also. But will 7nm provide a good view from a dark site?


In my bortle 6 sky all filters work well and fairly similar. I have 12, 8, 6, 3.5. The biggest difference I see between them is detail of the object and even that is subtle. It's more obvious 12 to 3.5. However, any of them are good.

For Barnard's Loop I am not sure I have done a ton of comparisons that I can remember. I feel like it's good to have a 12nm for situations where the scope or object needs a bit less filtering. But 8,6,3.5 I think any are good. A 5 could be a good compromise if someone only wanted 1 of those.

The only benefit I see to having what I have is a few can be in the filter wheel and a few can be out for 1x and such.

#28 GOLGO13

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 01:34 PM

In my bortle 6 sky all filters work well and fairly similar. I have 12, 8, 6, 3.5. The biggest difference I see between them is detail of the object and even that is subtle. It's more obvious 12 to 3.5. However, any of them are good.

For Barnard's Loop I am not sure I have done a ton of comparisons that I can remember. I feel like it's good to have a 12nm for situations where the scope or object needs a bit less filtering. But 8,6,3.5 I think any are good. A 5 could be a good compromise if someone only wanted 1 of those.

The only benefit I see to having what I have is a few can be in the filter wheel and a few can be out for 1x and such.


To answer more directly, yes the 7nm would do well.

#29 a__l

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 02:59 PM

But will 7nm provide a good view from a dark site?

I have only such a filter. Barnard's loop is clearly visible. I recommend 3x. I have this Fujinon 75mm f/1.8



#30 JAC8

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 05:04 PM

Thanks much! I only have the 72nm now and of course that does nothing much.

What I have read is that at least the 7nm would show more stars, and may not work as well under light polluted skies.

But the only filters used on 1x NV that I looked through were Al with a 3nm at WSP and one of the Toledo gang with the same setup.



#31 GOLGO13

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 05:33 PM

Thanks much! I only have the 72nm now and of course that does nothing much.
What I have read is that at least the 7nm would show more stars, and may not work as well under light polluted skies.
But the only filters used on 1x NV that I looked through were Al with a 3nm at WSP and one of the Toledo gang with the same setup.


Yeah. I think all 8nm and lower are good. And I'm in fairly light polluted skies. One thing that happens at 1x is the view just cuts off on the edges of the view. The lower the nm the more cutoff. Doesn't mean you can't use it as you've seen, but it's a consideration.

Don't forget about longpass filters for everything other than nebulas. 685nm works great in light pollution. And try unfiltered sometimes also.

#32 nimitz69

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Posted 02 July 2021 - 06:15 PM

This thread seems to have drifted from its original purpose which I thought was quite good - tips and tricks, let’s try to get back posting tips and tricks and questions related to a posted tip or trick ...



#33 GOLGO13

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Posted 02 July 2021 - 08:02 PM

Yes, I was hoping for more input on this one. Not sure if I have any new ones. One might be don't judge your night vision experience on one night. Conditions can play a big role in night vision performance. Some nights are great and some not so much. Really good transparency is the key to me on performance.


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#34 Jethro7

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 10:44 PM

I'll add another one. Consider getting a long focal length scope for observing smaller DSOs such as Globular Clusters and Planetary Nebulas. I got a significant increase in capability when I tried out my 8 inch SCT. It would be good to have a long focal length scope paired with a low F-ratio scope. My best combo would be my 10 inch F4.7 and my 8 inch F10. 

 

So glad I didn't sell the SCT when I was trying to make up for the NV purchase.

Hello GOLGO13,

I found this  thread BeeBoping  around CN Night Vision Astronomy Topics. Thank you for starting it it has been useful. I agree about the SCT's, I had pretty much discontinued the use of my C8 Edge HD and it had been sitting around for a long time. Night Vision Astronomy is one thing that this scope is really good at and I to, am very glad that I had not sold the C8 off. One ironic thing about this Astro Hobby I have experienced that at sometimes the antithesis of what should be true, works marvelously well, bringing interesting surprises. 

 

My tip for this thread is go ahead and experiment with the gear you have. I have found that different scopes tend to like different Narrowband Ha and IR Longpass filters.I imagine that it has to do with the apertures, focal lengths and even sky conditions.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 18 August 2021 - 10:55 PM.


#35 GOLGO13

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 10:59 PM

Hello GOLGO13,
I found this thread BeeBoping around CN Night Vision Astronomy Topics. Thank you for starting it it has been useful. I agree about the SCT's, I had pretty much discontinued the use of my C8 Edge HD and it had been sitting around for a long time. Night Vision Astronomy is one thing that this scope is really good at and I to, am very glad that I had not sold the C8 off. One ironic thing about this Astro Hobby I have experienced that at sometimes the antithesis of what should be true, works marvelously well, bringing interesting surprises.

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Right on. Maybe we can get more tips going. Some people seem to disagree on focal length, but it only makes sense that it will zoom in. And shorter focal length scopes will show larger objects. There are some really big nebulas out there where a short focal length is useful.

I remember in posts many years ago people touting having multiple telescopes of different types is useful with night vision.

For globular clusters in light pollution it's quite helpful. I tend to not use any filters with the 8 inch SCT. It's always worth considering unfiltered as it can be the best view.

For the 8 inch to be good for nebulas, the 55mm with 67mm adapter afocal would be best. Getting it to F4 equivalent. I've not had a chance to try this yet, but I'm interested.

#36 Jethro7

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 11:28 PM

Right on. Maybe we can get more tips going. Some people seem to disagree on focal length, but it only makes sense that it will zoom in. And shorter focal length scopes will show larger objects. There are some really big nebulas out there where a short focal length is useful.

Hello GOLGO13,

I agree it does make sense when you think about it. I was quite surprised by this when I applied the PVS14 to my Starwave 102ED F/11. The general thought for viewing with a NVD is to go fast but like conventional viewing different scopes tend to work better for different applications, the same is true for Night Vision Astronomy.  The one shocking thing to me is just how big some Nebulae are in the eyepiece and instead of using my Starwave 152 F/11 my AT60ED F/6 is the better choice of scopes.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro




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