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The Discoveries of Galileo – Part 1: Jupiter

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#1 E-Ray

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Posted 01 January 2021 - 07:04 AM

We amateur astronomers should all be familiar with who Galileo di Vincenzo Bonaulti de Galilei aka Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was. He has been called the father of observational astronomy.

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#2 bruceosterberg

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Posted 01 January 2021 - 08:16 AM

Great Article, who Knew


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#3 SiriusLooker

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Posted 01 January 2021 - 11:42 AM

Nice article, -- Interesting that he(Galileo) was more interested in Military aspects of the (also called --the Looker) because he was able to profit from it at first, as did Hans, who also sold his (Lookers-Scopes) to Dutch army during the times.

 Sadly Galileo appear not to *(Wander-pun intended) around Jupiter when he did his drawings of the Moons of Jupiter. Because on Jan 8th barely just over 2degs away was the other planet of Uranus from Jupiter.

 

Dennis


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#4 fallenstarseven

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Posted 01 January 2021 - 04:44 PM

Interesting article, and some illustrations I hadn't seen before.  Noted that your second paragraph references Galileo's relationship with the Medicis in Florence, but the Bertini illustration shows him demonstrating the scope to the Doge and Venetian lawmakers in Venice in 1609, who are not part of the Tuscan state.  May want to correct the illustration to match the paragraph reference to the Medici.


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#5 E-Ray

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Posted 02 January 2021 - 09:12 AM

Thanks fallenstarseven for catching the issue with the figure 1 "courting the reigning Medici family." I will correct that statement for future use.

Regards, Ed

Interesting article, and some illustrations I hadn't seen before.  Noted that your second paragraph references Galileo's relationship with the Medicis in Florence, but the Bertini illustration shows him demonstrating the scope to the Doge and Venetian lawmakers in Venice in 1609, who are not part of the Tuscan state.  May want to correct the illustration to match the paragraph reference to the Medici.


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#6 E-Ray

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Posted 02 January 2021 - 09:13 AM

Thanks Dennis. Yes, Galileo initially was making the spyglass available for military use.

 

Ed

Nice article, -- Interesting that he(Galileo) was more interested in Military aspects of the (also called --the Looker) because he was able to profit from it at first, as did Hans, who also sold his (Lookers-Scopes) to Dutch army during the times.

 Sadly Galileo appear not to *(Wander-pun intended) around Jupiter when he did his drawings of the Moons of Jupiter. Because on Jan 8th barely just over 2degs away was the other planet of Uranus from Jupiter.

 

Dennis


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#7 Cali

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Posted 07 January 2021 - 08:22 PM

Nice article.

 

Someone actually built one.

 

Video "Looking through Galileo's Telescope"

 

- Cal


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#8 alkotz

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Posted 09 January 2021 - 11:05 PM

I remember reading a few interesting paragraphs about Galileo's observations in a history of western science text many years ago. This was a nice read going much deeper on the subject. I look forward to future parts. Thanks.

 

Art


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#9 iseegeorgesstar

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Posted 10 January 2021 - 11:18 AM

Excited for the second article -- thanks!



#10 E-Ray

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Posted 11 January 2021 - 09:53 AM

Hi Cal,

That's an interesting link and I had watched that video last summer. Here's a link to Jim and xxxxxx Morris's effort to create exact replicas of Galileo's scopes including the gold leaf decorations. They spent a lifetime making replica of other scientific instruments including the Curie's apparatus for discovering radium, Mosely spectrascope, etc. This website is around 10 years old but still has a lot of interesting information and detail on how Jim and Rhoda made their replicas.

 

Regards, Ed

 

http://www.scitechan...ileo_telescope/

 

Nice article.

 

Someone actually built one.

 

Video "Looking through Galileo's Telescope"

 

- Cal


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#11 Ford Prefect

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 12:58 PM

Nice article.

 

Someone actually built one.

 

Video "Looking through Galileo's Telescope"

 

- Cal

Hi,

a member of my astronomy club in Rome made a replica (even using same materials) years ago, and we used it at a public event to illustrate the actual view through it. We even tried to use it with a very simple alt-az mount (since Galileo never described how he mounted the telescope. The drawings of mounted telescopes are years after the Sidereus Nuncius). It is amazing how small is the field of view and how hard is to point the telescope.

 

Some astronomers in Arcetri Astronomical Observatory in 2009-2010 tried even to grind and to polish the lenses using the same method used at the time, to reproduce also the aberrations due to the not so perfect figure of the lenses and homogeneity of the glass. If you look at his drawings, you see spikes on stellar objects and sort of "halo" that Galileo drew like a thicker outline around bright planets.



#12 Cali

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Posted 16 January 2021 - 10:17 AM

I'm looking forward to Part II.

 

And here I complain about my 'lil 127mm Mak.

 

- Cal



#13 Special Ed

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Posted 16 January 2021 - 04:26 PM

E-Ray,

 

Very interesting article--nicely done!  As you know, I share your respect for Galileo and his accomplishments.  The video that was linked upthread was also quite informative.

 

I noticed you mentioned Stillman Drake's translation of Sidereus Nuncius.  Have you seen the translation by Albert Van Helden?  It is a later translation than Drake's and contains many explanatory notes.  You might want to take a look if you aren't familiar with it.

 

Sidereus Nuncius translated by Albert Van Helden, University of Chicago Press, 1989

 

Regards.


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#14 E-Ray

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Posted 16 January 2021 - 08:01 PM

E-Ray,

 

Very interesting article--nicely done!  As you know, I share your respect for Galileo and his accomplishments.  The video that was linked upthread was also quite informative.

 

I noticed you mentioned Stillman Drake's translation of Sidereus Nuncius.  Have you seen the translation by Albert Van Helden?  It is a later translation than Drake's and contains many explanatory notes.  You might want to take a look if you aren't familiar with it.

 

Sidereus Nuncius translated by Albert Van Helden, University of Chicago Press, 1989

 

Regards.

Hey Voyager I, thanks for the heads up about Albert Van Helden. I'll have to request his book from my library!

 

Regards, Ed



#15 gwd

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Posted Yesterday, 07:49 PM

I got this version at a library of congress tent sale years ago.  It was "only" 70 bucks as I recall.  I would not have paid 250. I donated it to the Astronomy Lyceum in Magdalena New Mexico in 2018. It included interesting articles in addition to the facsimile and translation.

 

https://www.amazon.c...i/dp/1929154496




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