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Mars on Dec 27 2020

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#1 John Boudreau

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Posted 11 January 2021 - 09:28 PM

I enjoyed very good Winter seeing conditions back on Dec 27 which is unusual in my area. Of course those conditions started to deteriorate during the subsequent RGB and UV sequences, making me wonder... what *if* I had started imaging just 20 minutes or so earlier? question.gif

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#2 Sunspot

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Posted 11 January 2021 - 10:29 PM

Lot's of nice detail there. Personally I think playing the "what if" game would drive me nuts, so I avoid it. Considering that a lot of folks have stopped imaging Mars now, any time imaging is good. (BTW, I was out imaging tonight...seeing was decent, gotta love the desert). lol.gif


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#3 John Boudreau

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 09:50 AM

Lot's of nice detail there. Personally I think playing the "what if" game would drive me nuts, so I avoid it. Considering that a lot of folks have stopped imaging Mars now, any time imaging is good. (BTW, I was out imaging tonight...seeing was decent, gotta love the desert). lol.gif

Thanks Paul! And thanks for the 'likes' guys!

 

Paul, I also got to image Mars two nights ago about 45 minutes earlier than on Dec 27---- just at the transition of nautical to astronomical twilight. While seeing was not as good as during this post's image, it was still worthwhile and stayed so for nearly two hours which was a nice surprise. I had tried on every clear evening since 12/27, but it was virtually impossible to even focus each time--- sadly that's all too common around here this time of year. bawling.gif   

 

Still about 6 to 7 weeks away from receiving and testing that custom filter we've discussed, but of course Mars will be only about 6" then. But that will give me at least a good reason for continuing for a few more months with Mars!


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#4 Kokatha man

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 05:19 PM

<"I had tried on every clear evening since 12/27, but it was virtually impossible to even focus each time--- sadly that's all too common around here this time of year." bawling.gif>

 

Sounds like last night here John...still, I like to find something positive in every attempt, no matter how futile the results might be: this time it was that I cleaned my glasses really well beforehand..! rofl2.gif

 

 


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#5 John Boudreau

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 09:08 AM

<"I had tried on every clear evening since 12/27, but it was virtually impossible to even focus each time--- sadly that's all too common around here this time of year." bawling.gif>

 

Sounds like last night here John...still, I like to find something positive in every attempt, no matter how futile the results might be: this time it was that I cleaned my glasses really well beforehand..! rofl2.gif

Thanks Darryl. Fortunately the attempts for me are somewhat easier than for most imagers, as the scope is permanently mounted in a ROR backyard observatory. There many clear nights this time of year when the stars are twinkling like crazy so it's not even worth opening the roof. But yes, I too usually find the good even when the seeing isn't cooperating and try to wait out the seeing hoping for steady periods. Part of the fun is simply using the scope and 'playing with the toys'. Sort of like still enjoying fishing to a degree even if they're not biting. fishing.gif

 

I also usually clean my glasses before an imaging session although I can view the screen without them if need be. Wish I could also 'wash away' a **** cataract in the early stages of forming in my right eye, but that's happening so slowly I'm learning to compensate for it for the most part.  gramps.gif



#6 Kokatha man

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 06:41 PM

Yes, nothing like the years just rolling racing by John! :rofl: The cataracts in my eyes must be advancing very slowly as it doesn't seem to have changed much for either eye over the last decade. :fingerscrossed:

 

I "Liked" your image here earlier, but being absolutely objective it probably moves towards a "superb" rating when one considers overall appearance as well as the fine details & clouds etc, most especially for the time of the year! waytogo.gif waytogo.gif waytogo.gif


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#7 Sunspot

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 07:28 PM

Yes, nothing like the years just rolling racing by John! rofl2.gif The cataracts in my eyes must be advancing very slowly as it doesn't seem to have changed much for either eye over the last decade. fingerscrossed.gif

 

I "Liked" your image here earlier, but being absolutely objective it probably moves towards a "superb" rating when one considers overall appearance as well as the fine details & clouds etc, most especially for the time of the year! waytogo.gif waytogo.gif waytogo.gif

SHHHHHH!! Don't say cataracts! Mine are like yours and I don't want them to wake up and get frisky...lol.giflol.giflol.giflol.gif


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#8 kbev

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 09:39 PM

SHHHHHH!! Don't say cataracts! Mine are like yours and I don't want them to wake up and get frisky...lol.giflol.giflol.giflol.gif

I hope they stay that way for both of you, I've already had both of my lens replaced due to steroid-induced cataracts (too many steroid-based medications prescribed by various doctors).

 

And Paul I'm glad you've been able to continue imaging Mars, it seems like half of my free nights it's just cloudy enough for me to not bother and the clear nights I usually have something else going on.  


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#9 Jeff B1

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 10:58 AM

John, very good image where I can actually do science with it. Wait a minute, will have to compute the SPC width smile.gif

 

Okay, the SPC is ~7.2 degrees in width.  Thanks John.


Edited by Jeff B1, 14 January 2021 - 11:05 AM.

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#10 sfugardi

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 07:54 PM

John, excellent images! Details are well resolved considering this late in the season. The processing and colors look nice. Are you using the Astrodon UV? I have never tried it on anything except Venus. Last year, I swapped out my L filter slot for the UV. With my filter wheel defaulting to L when I turn it, the view goes dark right off the bat until I change it. 2 years ago, I moved from my dark backyard in New Milford to in Northborough which may be near where you are. Besides the street light and the Worcester night glow, seeing up here seems worse than CT. I can't complain since I can reach my observatory in 1 extension cord vs the old 4 on a hose reel. I really like your 14.5" DK Royce scope and images you capture from it.

 

Regards,

Steve


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#11 John Boudreau

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 11:48 PM

John, very good image where I can actually do science with it. Wait a minute, will have to compute the SPC width smile.gif

 

Okay, the SPC is ~7.2 degrees in width.  Thanks John.

Thanks Jeff!

 

I know how to measure linear distances in WinJUPOS--- Since the image is still somewhat fuzzy and so the polar cap boundaries are subject to a range of interpretation, I get answers in WJ varying from about 340 to 390km. For the degrees, did you use an inclinometer on the image? I used one from an app on my cell phone and got several answers just above 7 degrees. 

 

BTW--- I'm glad you wrote 7.2 degrees in width ! That way, I couldn't be puzzled by the thought --- How the *mrevil.gif* did he determine the cap's temperature? question.gif  rofl2.gif



#12 John Boudreau

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Posted 15 January 2021 - 12:34 AM

John, excellent images! Details are well resolved considering this late in the season. The processing and colors look nice. Are you using the Astrodon UV? I have never tried it on anything except Venus. Last year, I swapped out my L filter slot for the UV. With my filter wheel defaulting to L when I turn it, the view goes dark right off the bat until I change it. 2 years ago, I moved from my dark backyard in New Milford to in Northborough which may be near where you are. Besides the street light and the Worcester night glow, seeing up here seems worse than CT. I can't complain since I can reach my observatory in 1 extension cord vs the old 4 on a hose reel. I really like your 14.5" DK Royce scope and images you capture from it.

 

Regards,

Steve

Thanks Steve!

 

I've owned an Astrodon UVenus filter for maybe 10 years and it's a great UV filter, but back in August bought a Chroma U-Bessell photometric filter (on sale too at the time!) largely because it's advertised bandpass (320 to 400nm) looked even better than the Astrodon (320 to 385nm) so I took the chance. In practice, the Chroma passes about 2x the light (or more) probably because the planets I've tried it on to date tend to reflect more UV in the longer UV wavelengths, along with the camera's better UV sensitivity near 400 vs. 320nm. Christophe Pellier also bought one in the Summer, and he claims about 2 to 2.5x the UV sensitivity. Paul Maxon also has become a fan of the Chroma U-Bessell. I've been in touch with Chroma and have suggested they also market it as a Venus UV filter--- time will tell if that happens. They're making a mistake if they don't! For Mars and Jupiter binning 2x2 is still required, but 1x1 is fantastic for Venus. Keep in mind that I remove the protective A/R coated window on my cameras to allow more UV through, as does Christophe. My f/18 DK also doesn't require a Barlow as it's a native 6630mm FL, so there's no UV absorption from added optics.

 

https://www.cloudyni...uv-on-august-23

 

I'm probably about an hour's drive away from Northborough, near the coast in Saugus just W of Lynn. As the crow flies, maybe 35 to 40 miles. But I also live along a river with a reasonable marsh area that probably helps my local seeing vs. other areas. As long as the planets are high enough over local houses and trees the thermals aren't too bad. Saturn and Jupiter have been a problem recently but the next few years will fix that! Your sky will certainly be darker than mine as I'm just N of Boston.


Edited by John Boudreau, 15 January 2021 - 12:36 AM.

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#13 Jeff B1

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Posted 15 January 2021 - 06:16 AM

Thanks Jeff!

 

I know how to measure linear distances in WinJUPOS--- Since the image is still somewhat fuzzy and so the polar cap boundaries are subject to a range of interpretation, I get answers in WJ varying from about 340 to 390km. For the degrees, did you use an inclinometer on the image? I used one from an app on my cell phone and got several answers just above 7 degrees. 

 

BTW--- I'm glad you wrote 7.2 degrees in width ! That way, I couldn't be puzzled by the thought --- How the *mrevil.gif* did he determine the cap's temperature? question.gif  rofl2.gif

I'm old fashioned:  http://www.alpo-astr...PcapMeasure.htm

 

he image was not all that fuzzy!  It is good enough to get a close measurement.  You can find the latitude using WinJUPOS.

 

I suspect the temp to be around 120 K


Edited by Jeff B1, 15 January 2021 - 06:19 AM.

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#14 happylimpet

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Posted 15 January 2021 - 07:16 PM

... what *if* I had started imaging just 20 minutes or so earlier? question.gif

My best images of the apparition in September started with the best of the night (with Mars around 30 degrees altitude) and slowly deteriorated, even as Mars rose.......what if i had started earlier? Yup, been there.....


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#15 CPellier

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 11:50 AM

Excellent late images with a nice UV !


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