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Polar alignment

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7 replies to this topic

#1 GKA

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Posted 16 January 2021 - 05:48 PM

I have en HEQ5 pro with an skywatcher evostar 80ed and a canon 600d on top.
When i'm polar aligned, and have my camera in live view in APT, i can see the polar/North star on my computer screen.
(My mount is mounted in an observatory, so it's not going to be moved.)
Would it be wrong to senter it to the computer screen and APT using the crosshairs in the program?
I would probably mess up the alignment in the reticle, but not by much, and the reticle hasn't been calibrated Anyway.
Thanks?
Ps. Not sure if this is the right forum, so feel free to move it.

Edited by GKA, 16 January 2021 - 05:49 PM.


#2 SonnyE

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Posted 16 January 2021 - 06:03 PM

I use Sharp Cap Pro for my Polar Alignment.

And while I use a different camera, on a different mount, I use the camera programs crosshairs to get the alignment centered.

I also use the crosshairs in PHD2 when running.

 

But using your main camera, to me, makes the most sense. After all, that is what you want centered in the end.

I like the crosshairs for an instant reference to the center of the screen. 

 

Remember that Polar Alignment is to get your mount centered on the NCP. It's a mechanical function.

Then Alignment is to teach the mount where things are in the sky, A memory function.

But both are to get your telescope centered on your objects.

 

But I use my telescope and mounted camera for all of it.



#3 GKA

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Posted 16 January 2021 - 06:25 PM

Thanks, Just What i thought also, but wasn't sure.
Guess it woun't Hurt to try.

#4 t-ara-fan

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Posted 16 January 2021 - 07:05 PM

OP do you mean move the mount ALT and AZ? To center Polaris? Polaris is not at the pole, but it is close.

#5 GKA

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 05:18 AM

Yes, that is What i ment, center polaris to the center of the screen (where the scope actually points.)

Edited by GKA, 17 January 2021 - 05:19 AM.


#6 alphatripleplus

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 09:32 AM

Polaris is about 40 arcminutes from the north celestial pole, so centring it in your field of view will not accurately align the mount's polar axis. In addition, this also does not account for cone error between the optical axis of the scope and the polar axis. As mentioned above, if you can use SharpCap, the  polar alignment routine is very quick and accurate, and handles a number of factors that affect polar alignment (such as cone error).



#7 Eddie_42

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 10:09 AM

I have en HEQ5 pro with an skywatcher evostar 80ed and a canon 600d on top.
When i'm polar aligned, and have my camera in live view in APT, i can see the polar/North star on my computer screen.
(My mount is mounted in an observatory, so it's not going to be moved.)
Would it be wrong to senter it to the computer screen and APT using the crosshairs in the program?
I would probably mess up the alignment in the reticle, but not by much, and the reticle hasn't been calibrated Anyway.
Thanks?
Ps. Not sure if this is the right forum, so feel free to move it.

 

what your camera sees and how your mount is aligned are wholly different topics.   I can point my mount south and still figure out some combination of RA/DEC twisting to take a picture of Polaris. It will have a host of other issues, but I could do it. Also, as others have mentioned, Polaris is not located at the pole.

 

You will want to align the mount using the reticle as best as you can. Put the Camera/Mount in the "weights down" position (you will likely have polaris in view, but that isnt a requirement....you just need to be close), then do a software based polar alignment. That software will help you tweak the AZ and EL settings on the mount to get your RA axis fine tuned to the correct location.

 

Since you are in an observatory, and not tearing down equipment you dont have to do this every time. If it were me, Id check pretty often in the beginning weeks/months and verify the alignments are holding, then taper off how often I checked it.



#8 GKA

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 02:10 PM

Exellent, thank you all for your help, i Just leave as it is then.
Thanks. 👍


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