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Scope for astrophotography.

astrophotography collimation eq imaging reflector
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#1 arciaq

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 08:18 AM

Hi

So im looking for a cheap and lightweight scope for astrophotography only.

 

I own:

- Sony A68 (unmodified)

- SkyWatcher EQ6 

- Coma corrector 

- Asi 120 and guide scope (soon)

- uhc-s and skyglow filter

- Bortle 3/4/5 depending on the place

- Laser colimator

 

I want a scope to be:

- Lightweight 

- Field of view (to catch whole m45 in the frame or m42 with running man nebula or horsehead nebula with flame nebula)

- I wouldn't like to colimate it every time i go outside

 

I found 2 scopes:

Gso 6" 150/600 F/4

SkyWatcher 130/650 F/5

 

Thanks for help!

 

 

 

 



#2 Hesiod

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 08:28 AM

Well, if do not want to mess with collimation too often I suggest to purchase a small refractor with focal below 500mm.

There are several suitable models in the 60-70mm range, with prices not far from those of the reflectors you are looking at



#3 arciaq

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 08:39 AM

How about field flattener? 



#4 Sandy Swede

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 08:45 AM

First, 'cheap' and 'astrophotography' in the same sentence is an oxymoron.  wink.gif

 

I would not start AP with a Newtonian, especially those that sport inherently flimsy focusers.  Then there is the backfocus issue.  Hesiod has given good advice.


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#5 Hesiod

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 08:47 AM

There is at least a 65/420 4-lenses model with native flat field; otherwise may purchase a field flattener (some have "dedicated" flatteners, other must rely on "generic" ones).

The 65/420 is more expensive, but also the easiest option. In the end it is up to you to decide how much efforts are willing to do, and how much are willing to pay to make the task easier



#6 shark-bait

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 08:13 PM

If it needs to be a dedicated astrophotography scope and you do not want to collimate it, definitely consider a small refractor. The Williams Optics Redcat is a good option here. (250mm APO @ f/4.9) Wide field of view, good optics, comes with a dovetail, rings, and doesn’t require a lot of mount.

Oh yeah... you don’t have to collimate it every time you want to use it.

Edited by shark-bait, 25 January 2021 - 08:15 PM.


#7 Fitz8710

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 10:58 PM

I am starting on a newtonian... lets just say should of went with a refractor. Although now that my proccesses and work flow is getting better i am starting to enjoy it more. Cheap... astrophotagraphy... roflmao.gif

Edited by Fitz8710, 28 January 2021 - 10:59 PM.


#8 Moosi

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 01:18 AM

Well, I'm a total newbie but did some research (much of it on this forum) and, if you disregard the no collimation requirement maybe Skywatcher 130P-DS (not the P version). There is a thread, with mind-boggling photos taken with it - in the forum.

Issue is it doesn't sell in the US. By chance I saw a known German vendor selling it, called, he had two. Now he has one.

Sent from my SM-G955F using Tapatalk

Edited by Moosi, 29 January 2021 - 01:20 AM.


#9 Fitz8710

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 08:36 AM

Im a newbie too. Dont worry lol. Starting with an 8 inch newt isnt exactly easy, but it does teach you a whole lot. The images you can produce from a modest grade mirror (with the right correction/spacing ect..) is pretty amazing. Whilst i wish i started with a good refractor (alot more $$) I dont regret going with my newt. Only my wallet has regret so far.... heheheh but that is my fault.

O_O
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#10 shark-bait

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 10:29 AM

I enjoy "tinkering" with fast newtonians and they produce great images for a lower price point.  The only downside is that it takes more mount to guide a larger aperture with a longer focal length.  As for collimation, it is no different than a guitarist tuning a guitar before playing.  It almost becomes second nature and quick.



#11 BigKahuna

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 11:57 AM

I'm using a Celestron AVX with the F/5  6" Reflector (C6N) combination. I use a Canon DSLR and the ASIair Pro system from ZWO. Works fine for me. They currently do not support Sony DSLRs in the software though. 

 

AVXsetup.jpg

 

Rosette122221-A.jpg

 

Horsehead1-A.jpg


Edited by BigKahuna, 29 January 2021 - 12:07 PM.

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#12 Moosi

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 11:59 AM

I enjoy "tinkering" with fast newtonians and they produce great images for a lower price point. The only downside is that it takes more mount to guide a larger aperture with a longer focal length. As for collimation, it is no different than a guitarist tuning a guitar before playing. It almost becomes second nature and quick.

I'm looking into collimators right now (laser looks the simplest way).
I'm thinking of building a Cheshire collimator (my father in law has a precision grade metal workshop, and I feel that I'm not doing my duty if I'm not driving him nutz with requests).

Sent from my SM-G955F using Tapatalk

Edited by Moosi, 29 January 2021 - 01:31 PM.


#13 Fitz8710

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 12:34 PM

Very nice rosette and horsehead. Yea reflectors can bring out very good detail. I got this the other night with my 203mm Orion and Cg5 with eqstar goto. (Found out during processing i had pinched optics ouch) its alot of work with a newt which is why people recommend small refractors.

If you go with a reflector and have patience and go into it with the right expectations you will be happy.


Link to astrobin for rosette
https://www.astrobin...3979.1606454379

Edited by Fitz8710, 29 January 2021 - 12:35 PM.

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#14 shark-bait

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 01:35 PM

I'm looking into collimators right now (laser looks the simplest way).
I'm thinking of building a crayford collimator (my father in law has a precision grade metal workshop, and I feel that I'm not doing my duty if I'm not driving him nutz with requests).

Sent from my SM-G955F using Tapatalk

Lasers are simple but not always the best for imaging quality collimation.  If you go the laser route, invest in a quality set like a Glatter and Blug.  A good cheshire/sight tube combo works very well for a fraction of the money.  I would still recommend the sight tube and cheshire combo in addition to the laser as the laser alone does not ensure proper secondary placement.



#15 Fitz8710

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Posted 29 January 2021 - 02:18 PM

Plus one what he/she said about lasers. I also sometimes use a barlowed laser then re check with cheshire. Focuser and slop are the issue, along with cheap uncollimated lasers.


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