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Have the scope....time for eyepiece help

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#1 mayhem13

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 06:44 PM

So I’ll introduce myself again.....newbie here just purchased and broke first light with a 12” DOB and I’m hooked! We viewed Mercury, Mars and the Moon first night. The seller through in a bonus eyepiece to get me started.....a Zoom with range from 7-25mm. Eye relief was comfortable enough. So what next as far as eyepieces?.....or should I ask the question in the specific forum? I’m learning in my Bortle 8 backyard for now but plan on heading out to a Bortle 2-3 site soon as the weather breaks.


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#2 sevenofnine

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 07:01 PM

If the zoom is comfortable to use and you are satisfied with the view then supplement it with a wide angle eyepiece. The flood gates will open with suggestions on this forum lol.gif but generally something in a 2 inch 28mm-35mm is recommended. Go slow with the purchases. It's easy to fall down the eyepiece rabbit hole moneyeyes.gif


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#3 Avgvstvs

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 07:09 PM

I think a good range would be 30, 20, 14, 9mm

Starting with low power. And go for 68 to 82 degree's

Once you get out of the toilet roll field of view of your zoom

you will probably never look back. Investing in quality eyepieces is always a good move.

You may change your telescopes, but a great eyepiece lasts forever



#4 Jethro7

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 07:12 PM

So I’ll introduce myself again.....newbie here just purchased and broke first light with a 12” DOB and I’m hooked! We viewed Mercury, Mars and the Moon first night. The seller through in a bonus eyepiece to get me started.....a Zoom with range from 7-25mm. Eye relief was comfortable enough. So what next as far as eyepieces?.....or should I ask the question in the specific forum? I’m learning in my Bortle 8 backyard for now but plan on heading out to a Bortle 2-3 site soon as the weather breaks.

Hello Mayhem13,

Welcome to the Addiction, 

I would recomend a wide field of view eyepiece in the 30mm neighborhood. To help you locate your objects and provide those beautiful  low power wide field views. I plan to purchase a couple of  APM XWA 110° eyepieces, a 5mm and 3.5mm. I would  like to stay with the Televue Ethos line but I dont want to spend a bunch of money on eyepieces that I will not be able to use very often but would be nice to have around when I can.They run $ 239.00 and $245.00 respectively. They come with good  recommendations from many people that responded to my Topic on the APM XWA eyepiece series.  

My main single focal lengh eyepieces are a TV 10mm Ethos, ES 20mm 100° and a Televue 31mm NT5 82,° plus the Baader 8X24 Zoom and 2.5 X Barlow. These four eyepieces are my core eyepieces that I use most often.  Dobs and wide field eyepieces go together milk and honey.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro



#5 mayhem13

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Posted 24 January 2021 - 11:21 PM

If the zoom is comfortable to use and you are satisfied with the view then supplement it with a wide angle eyepiece. The flood gates will open with suggestions on this forum lol.gif but generally something in a 2 inch 28mm-35mm is recommended. Go slow with the purchases. It's easy to fall down the eyepiece rabbit hole moneyeyes.gif

Someone mentioned ‘toilet role’.....and that’s the feeling I had when using the zoom lens. For reference, the 3/4 moon filled nearly the entire FOV at the 25mm setting and at 7mm for Mars.....so I’m assuming this lens has a very narrow FOV? I think the one I have is the SVBONY SV135? Spec says 52 degrees FOV.....I guess that’s pretty narrow.



#6 mayhem13

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 12:01 AM

Would something like this   https://www.adorama.com/md20uw.html. make for a nice lense for planetary and moon viewing?......or should I be looking at seperate lenses for moon and planets?



#7 havasman

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 12:27 AM

So I’ll introduce myself again.....newbie here just purchased and broke first light with a 12” DOB and I’m hooked! We viewed Mercury, Mars and the Moon first night. The seller through in a bonus eyepiece to get me started.....a Zoom with range from 7-25mm. Eye relief was comfortable enough. So what next as far as eyepieces?.....or should I ask the question in the specific forum? I’m learning in my Bortle 8 backyard for now but plan on heading out to a Bortle 2-3 site soon as the weather breaks.

If you look at the replies so far you see that you should buy cheap stuff that'll be intermittently satisfying until you decide to buy again. Wasteful. Or advice to overload one end or the other...

Give us a break and get better advice by telling us your budget (per ep and total), what you like or expect to see, where you observe and what size eyepiece kit you expect to end up with. Tell us whether you want nebula or planetary filters too. Then filter your answers by ones that fit your stated model and just maybe you will have gotten some help.

And if you can't provide those bits of info for us then you probably should observe with what you have for a while until you learn what it is you may want to accomplish. We'll be around.

They're eyepieces. Eyepieces have lenses in them but they're eyepieces. If you have an 18th Century sensibility, they're oculars. But folks may laugh at your high button shoes.

Just trying to help.


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#8 sevenofnine

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 01:05 AM

There's nothing wrong with the Meade 20/82 eyepiece you selected but you will want three or four more to cover all your viewing needs. Probably a 30mm, 15mm, 10mm, 5mm. Of course you don't have to buy them all at once but that's where your zoom can help you decide which one's next. What you really lack at the moment is a wide eyepiece that really helps you find objects. That's an eyepiece in the 30mm range. Good luck on your choices!



#9 Bigal1817

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 12:42 PM

Nice work on the big dob!  My dob has it's "finder eyepiece" in the focuser ~90% of the time.  Mine came with a 30mm GSO 2" ep that can be found in the CN classifieds for <$50.  I found it was a good ep but chose to replace it with the 35mm Panoptic.  The Pan spans a wider field of Space (2 degrees vs 1.7) and I found the stars are crisper to the edge of the field as opposed to the "seagull" stars.  Both ep are substantial upgrades from the Kellner 26mm Meade that came with my first telescope.  By all means, upgrade your finder eyepeice!



#10 aeajr

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Posted 27 January 2021 - 04:39 PM

So I’ll introduce myself again.....newbie here just purchased and broke first light with a 12” DOB and I’m hooked! We viewed Mercury, Mars and the Moon first night. The seller through in a bonus eyepiece to get me started.....a Zoom with range from 7-25mm. Eye relief was comfortable enough. So what next as far as eyepieces?.....or should I ask the question in the specific forum? I’m learning in my Bortle 8 backyard for now but plan on heading out to a Bortle 2-3 site soon as the weather breaks.

I have the Apertura AD12, 12" Dob, so I can closely relate to what you have.  Which Dob do you have?
 

Someone mentioned ‘toilet role’.....and that’s the feeling I had when using the zoom lens. For reference, the 3/4 moon filled nearly the entire FOV at the 25mm setting and at 7mm for Mars.....so I’m assuming this lens has a very narrow FOV? I think the one I have is the SVBONY SV135? Spec says 52 degrees FOV.....I guess that’s pretty narrow.

Zooms are like every eyepiece, a compromise.  You give up some field of view to gain flexibility in magnification.   As you can see in my signature, I have a variety of eyepieces.  My two low power/wide view and my 8-24 zoom are my most used eyepieces.

 

If you are new to the field of eyepieces and Barlow lenses, I suggest you read these two articles. They will clarify a lot. 

 

 

Understanding and using a Barlow Lens
https://telescopicwatch.com/?s=barlow

 

Understanding Telescope Eyepieces- There are recommendations, based on budget,
but the meat of the article is about understanding the considerations and specifications
to know when selecting eyepieces.
https://telescopicwa...cope-eyepieces/

 

For your 12" I would suggest one or two low power wide view 2" eyepieces.   Work with the zoom for now.  If you have a 2X Barlow it will extend the range of the zoom.

 

I have an Agena Astro/Orion Q70 2" 38 mm/70 degree as my lowest power/widest view eyepiece.   Gives me 40X and 1.7 degree field of view.  I also have a Meade 20 mm /82 degree for 76X and around 1 degree FOV.   

 

After those I usually go to my Baader Hyperion 8-24 zoom for 63 to 190X.   Above that I go to 82 degree 6.7, 5.5 and 4.7 to take me up to 326X  I typically don't go any higher than that, but if I want to I Barlow one of my eyepieces or the zoom. I have 1.5X 2X and 2.5X Barlows that I can use to take me 815X.  (in my dreams!)

 

Over time you will likely want to fill in with single FL eyepieces with wider AFOV.  Or you may wish to go to a zoom with wider AFOV.   The article covers the considerations and provides some suggestions. 


Edited by aeajr, 27 January 2021 - 04:47 PM.

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#11 chrysalis

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Posted 27 January 2021 - 04:49 PM

Lots of good advice already and your head is probably swimming. Havasman had some of the most focused and better advice for us to help you.

 

Only thing I'll add is this: if your 12" is an f/4.9 like mine, the more inexpensive wider field EPs will not perform well at the edge. Even the 66° Orion Expanse EPs in 20 mm (and I'll guess 15 mm) are pretty bad, while the 6 mm and 9 mm versions are OK. By the time you are in a 68° Stratus, with more lenses, the better correction translates to all of them from 21 mm on down to 5mm working nicely.

 

I have the Explore Scientific 82° EPs (14, 11, 8.8, 6.7. 4.7 mm) and the 100° EPs (20, 14, 9, 5.5 mm). All of these work very nicely in the fast telescope.

 

Beware: once you've acquired the taste for wide field EPs, you are spoiled forever and lesser AFOVs feel very cramped / restricted.

 

Regardless you will have a lifetime of fun and gosh!! - you can access Bortle 2-3?!?!?!? That is EXCELLENT ! ! !


Edited by chrysalis, 28 January 2021 - 03:57 PM.


#12 aeajr

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Posted 27 January 2021 - 04:51 PM

Since you are in a Bortle 8 location, same as mine, you may find star hopping a bit of a challenge.   You might consider using AltAz coordinates to find your targets. This is my primary method.

 

 

Seven Ways To Find Things In the Sky
https://www.cloudyni...-the-sky-are-th
ere-others/

 

I added an AZ scale to the base of my AD12 and use an angle gauge to set altitude.  Works great!   

 

Using an angle gauge to help find targets – AltAz coordinates

My AD12 mods show up around post 139

https://www.cloudyni...ind-your-target
s-in-a-light-polluted-sky/#entry8120838


Edited by aeajr, 27 January 2021 - 04:52 PM.

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#13 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 01:55 AM

Eyepieces are a very individual thing: one mans trash is another mans treasure. Bob Royce, a well respected mirror maker, said that you don't need all these fancy wide field eyepieces. Al Nagler, who produces the top tier Tele Vue eyepieces, would surely disagree. Fact is, the human eye can take in about 50°, which is why that is the standard field of view of the "standard" eyepieces. Wide field eyepieces offer significant benefits, but can be blurry near the edges. Fast optics have a curved image plane. It takes a well designed eyepiece to compensate for that.

Besides optical quality, you also need to consider size and weight. Switching from your lightweight low power overview eyepiece to a hand grenade sized Ethos may cause your scope to plunge, so a counterweight system is necessary. Switching back and forth between 1.25 and 2 " eyepieces can also be an issue. Eye relief is also an important consideration, especially if you wear glasses while observing. To to eliminate these problems, some manufacturers have bent over backwards to make eyepiece series that are all the same weight, fit in both 1.25 and 2" focusers without adapters, and have 20mm eye relief.

I suggest you stick with what you have for now. Join your local club and try out their eyepieces and see what you like. You can also buy used, and if you get something you don't like, you can sell it for what you paid.

#14 Stefano Delmonte

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 04:54 AM

So many advices, all goods of course but if you can found the Astronomy club nearest to you surely some mate will let you try eyepiecies in order to decide cause there is a matter of personal "taste" too.

 

I had a GSO 12" F5 dob for many years and I'd go for a 38mm 70º (in Agena there is a good one) in order to achive to widest field of view, add a 2" UHC filter to this eyepiece and enjoy nebulas like neverwink.gif

 

Second step a 18-20mm 82º will be a good go for open clusters(Explore scientific has a good one) , third step 9-11mm 82º for galaxies and globular clusters.

 

Then from 9mm down, in my opinion, every mm count, the reason is thst we enter the world of planetary nebulas, planets, Moon and doubles and every object depending of the night will let you magnify more or less. A cheap solution are the TMB planetary clones, 58º with a good corretion on axis.

 

for last and the best: don't hurry!smile.gif

 

Ste



#15 oldtimer

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 07:44 AM

When one is working from Bortle 8 skies it is almost impossible to get one's eyes to get fully dark sky adapted. The skies are just to bright. So while a 38mm eyepiece may really show those wide field of views with a F5 scope it is producing almost an 8mm exit pupil. This means your are not getting the use of all your aperture.  I think a 5mm exit pupil is the max one should shoot for. At F5 this means an eyepiece with no greater Fl than 25mm.. Even at that dimmer DSOs will require more magnification to darken the background in a smaller FOV.

 

Gary (oltimer) 



#16 DSOGabe

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 11:21 AM

I also recommend seeking out wider field eyepieces in the minimum of a  65-68 degree FOV. The issue then boils down to your budget. It you can swing it, I'd say look at Explore Scientific's lineup. 



#17 SeattleScott

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 01:23 PM

With a F5 scope the 15mm and 24mm 65 AFOV and 30mm 70 AFOV represent a good performance to price ratio. There are a few brands that are internally the same. Prices start at about $130 for the 15mm up to $230 for the 30mm.

Generally the premium brands run $250-370. One can certainly go up to $700+ if top of the line is desired.

Consider that the wider the AFOV, the more coma you will see. So there could be an advantage to a $130 65 AFOV over a $200 ES 14/82 or $240 14 Morpheus or $320 16 Nagler.

Budget kind of drives everything.

I used to be in about Bortle 7 skies and really preferred 5mm or at most 6mm exit pupil due to light pollution. That equates to 25-30mm focal length for a low power eyepiece. The Meade 28mm PWA would look real tempting. The 30mm 70 AFOV ones are a bit cheaper and significantly lighter. I like my ES 24 82 personally although on occasion the coma at edge of the field can be distracting, which will be true of any ultrawide eyepiece.

Obviously you can get a coma corrector and then go to town with 100 AFOV eyepieces.

Scott


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