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#1 jquittum

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 07:37 AM

I'm going back and forth between a Celestron CPC 1100 GPS XLT and a Skywatcher 350P 14'' goto Dob. This will be my one and only for the foreseeable future. Not traveling with either, but I drive a truck so wouldn't be a problem with room if I do. Will the 14'' Dob yield noticeably better views on DSOs than the 11'' SCT?
I do prefer the viewing position of the SCT.
Will not be my first telescope. I've had an SCT and a Dob in the past, just not as big with either.
Observational only. No photography.
Thanks for any opinions.

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#2 junomike

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 07:45 AM

I have a C11 ForkMount and have had a C14 also.  Currently my main OTA's are a SW 12 Synscan and Orion xx16g.

Unless the convenient eyepiece positioning of the CPC 1100 is a main factor, the SW 14 will easily best it on DSO's for magnitude as well as FOV (almost twice the FOV as the C11).

There's a bit more work in setting up the SW 14 unless you leave the base together (which is heavy) and I strongly recommend a Coma Corrector as well..

Also, don't forget the AstroZap Shroud required for the SW 14.  It's pricey but required and IMO worth it.

 

All in all the CPC1100 is a simpler set up (but not light), is easier on eyepieces, stores easier,  and excels at busting Globulars, however the SW 14 will show you more provided

you're willing to do a bit more work (Set up base, Collimation, Coma Corrector)


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#3 Sandy Swede

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 08:25 AM

There is an inverse relationship between aperture size (think weight & bulk) and the frequency of use.  Especially as you age.  Once you get past 10", a permanent or semi-permanent location (think mount) is more conducive to use.  However, I don't believe this applies to Dobs, especially on wheeled mounts.  YMMV.


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#4 jquittum

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 08:43 AM

I know collimation is not that hard on the dob, but I also like the fact that the SCT is probably going to stay collimated for a good while.

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#5 coopman

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 09:23 AM

Whichever choice you make, I feel for your lower back.  


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#6 alphatripleplus

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 09:34 AM

If you don't mind the possibility of collimation every time out, go with the big Dob. However, if you have to move either one around to an observing spot, that may have a significant impact on set-up time. 


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#7 jquittum

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 12:20 PM

The collimating every night is bothering me. I think I would probably become so obsessed with that, it might ruin the fun. I got so frustrated with my last Dob that I sold everything and left the hobby. I'm thinking SCT might alleviate that issue.

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#8 csrlice12

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 12:55 PM

First, pick up the 11" SCT and lift it over your head, now gently place it in the mount's saddle, set it back down on the ground, lock the mount so it won't  swivel, pick up the ota over your head again and place it in the saddle.  Holding it with one hand, tighten the locking knobs....next, do it in the dark when it's cold while wearing gloves...

 

Go with the dob...


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#9 junomike

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 01:28 PM

First, pick up the 11" SCT and lift it over your head, now gently place it in the mount's saddle, set it back down on the ground, lock the mount so it won't  swivel, pick up the ota over your head again and place it in the saddle.  Holding it with one hand, tighten the locking knobs....next, do it in the dark when it's cold while wearing gloves...

 

Go with the dob...

It's a CPC which is attached to the Forks.  Good news is the Tripod isn't too high , Bad news is the OTA/Forks weight in a 65lbs.



#10 junomike

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 01:30 PM

I know collimation is not that hard on the dob, but I also like the fact that the SCT is probably going to stay collimated for a good while.

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Collimation on an SCT IME is a few times a yr whereas it's every time with a Newt (unless not moved).  You get used to it though and in cooler temps (climate) it gives you something to do while the OTA cools down.


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#11 DSOGabe

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 01:58 PM

From your responses to other posts, seems you are already leaning towards the SCT somewhat. I would say that all in all, it is the better choice due the easier set up, collimation and eyepiece location. 

But I do admit bias towards any SCT.


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#12 DHurst

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 02:43 PM

Buy both and decide later! wink.gif

I’d buy the dob, and get the cats eye collimation tools which make it very easy and quick.


Edited by DHurst, 25 January 2021 - 02:43 PM.

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#13 jquittum

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 03:13 PM

Buy both and decide later! wink.gif
I’d buy the dob, and get the cats eye collimation tools which make it very easy and quick.

In my younger days when money grew on trees, or so I thought, that's exactly what I would have done!

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#14 brentknight

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 03:42 PM

I'm going back and forth between a Celestron CPC 1100 GPS XLT and a Skywatcher 350P 14'' goto Dob. This will be my one and only for the foreseeable future. Not traveling with either, but I drive a truck so wouldn't be a problem with room if I do. Will the 14'' Dob yield noticeably better views on DSOs than the 11'' SCT?
I do prefer the viewing position of the SCT.
Will not be my first telescope. I've had an SCT and a Dob in the past, just not as big with either.
Observational only. No photography.
Thanks for any opinions.

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Are you looking at the SkyWatcher over the Orion because of the lead time to get one?

 

The truss design of the Orion will hold collimation better.  Normally all I need to do is check the secondary with a good laser, and then use the Tublug on the primary - and I'm good - maybe 5 minutes tops.  Both adjustments are not that bad from night to night...



#15 jquittum

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 04:41 PM

Are you looking at the SkyWatcher over the Orion because of the lead time to get one?

The truss design of the Orion will hold collimation better. Normally all I need to do is check the secondary with a good laser, and then use the Tublug on the primary - and I'm good - maybe 5 minutes tops. Both adjustments are not that bad from night to night...

Not necessarily. The Orion looks nice too.

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#16 jquittum

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 02:10 PM

I went with the CPC, mostly because Skywatcher told me 6-8 month delivery.
Celestron said 2-6 weeks.

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#17 brentknight

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 02:35 PM

In 2 to 6 weeks, we expect to hear from you on how you like it.

 

Now...may we spend some more of your money on eyepieces???


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#18 jquittum

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Posted 28 January 2021 - 03:05 PM

In 2 to 6 weeks, we expect to hear from you on how you like it.

 

Now...may we spend some more of your money on eyepieces???

Yes! Lets spend more money!.

Actually I would like to hear opinions on those as well.



#19 OldManTaco70

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Posted 30 January 2021 - 04:20 PM

Go with the SCT. 

 

Bought a used 12" LX200 Classic and in 3 years of frequent wheeling across my desert backyard and patio pavers, I have yet to need to collimate.

 

No denying, it is heavy. OTA + fork/base = 77+ lbs. But if you put it on wheels or, in my case, a very sturdy cart, that weight is no longer an issue. (Terrain? Yes! but not the weight.) Add another 79+ lbs. for my sturdy cart when fully loaded with several 2" EPs, maps & books, That all tops out at 156+ lbs! Fully manageable and easily steerable!

 

I am 100% visual. No imaging! Once my wheels are locked, vibrations are not an issue.



#20 jquittum

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Posted 31 January 2021 - 07:55 AM

Go with the SCT.

Bought a used 12" LX200 Classic and in 3 years of frequent wheeling across my desert backyard and patio pavers, I have yet to need to collimate.

No denying, it is heavy. OTA + fork/base = 77+ lbs. But if you put it on wheels or, in my case, a very sturdy cart, that weight is no longer an issue. (Terrain? Yes! but not the weight.) Add another 79+ lbs. for my sturdy cart when fully loaded with several 2" EPs, maps & books, That all tops out at 156+ lbs! Fully manageable and easily steerable!

I am 100% visual. No imaging! Once my wheels are locked, vibrations are not an issue.

Sounds like it works quite well. Do you have any pictures of your cart?

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#21 alphatripleplus

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Posted 31 January 2021 - 11:44 AM

I went with the CPC, mostly because Skywatcher told me 6-8 month delivery.
Celestron said 2-6 weeks.

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Sounds like a reasonable choice. Let us know how it works out.



#22 OldManTaco70

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Posted 02 February 2021 - 02:41 AM

Reply to Jquittum

Base stainless steel cart, 1.5" laminated solid maple wood top with locking wheels, is a branded John Boos kitchen cart, of unknown vintage, plywood middle and dropdown shelves are recycled from 1970 VW Camper, and the actual OTA/fork is mounted on a 2x6-10 layers laminated beam scrap, which also doubles as my EP storage  device. Has been kept outside, year round, under a standard Patio propane heater cover. All of which is stored under my home's patio roof to minimize exposure to the AZ sun.

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#23 jquittum

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Posted 02 February 2021 - 06:16 AM

Very nice. Thank you for the idea.
Looks like you have lots of sky to see!

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