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19 Lyn

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#1 HaleBopper

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 05:27 PM

Hello all,

 

I'm interested in taking measurements of double stars, and I have a question for you more experienced folks. I was looking up 19 Lyn, and Burnham's Celestial Handbook gives values of 14.7" of separation and a PA of 315 deg. The

Night Sky Observers Guide gives values of 14.8" and 315 deg.

 

My question is regarding the value in the Washington Double Star Catalogue. I find these data:

 

07229+5517STF1062AB    1782 2019   92 317 317  14.2  13.8  5.76  6.71 B8V+B9V   -004-032 -008-036 +55 1192 NZW  072252.06+551653.3

 

If I have looked up the info correctly, the last observation was in 2019 and the separation is 13.8" and the PA 317 deg. Is this value the most up to date? Not much difference between the observations from 1782 and 2019; but compared to the literature references there is enough of a difference to give me pause.

 

I also found an old S & T online article that lists 19 lyn as a double star  that can be used for calibration, and the results are similar to the literature.

 

https://skyandtelesc...un-and-science/

 

Thank you


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#2 c2m2t

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Posted 25 January 2021 - 09:01 PM

Hi HaleBopper!

I would recommend that you check the website called Stelle Doppie. It is the dedicated work of an Italian double star observer and he has built a web page that makes accessing the information in the WDS (Washington Double Star Catalogue) a sheer joy. Here is the link:

 

https://www.stelledoppie.it/

 

Here is the opening page for 19 Lyn, aka STF 1062. This is the most current data from the WDS.

Good luck with your measurements!!

 

Cheers, Chris.

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Edited by c2m2t, 25 January 2021 - 09:08 PM.

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#3 HaleBopper

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Posted 26 January 2021 - 07:14 AM

Thanks for the link. I'll use it for reference.



#4 flt158

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Posted 26 January 2021 - 12:14 PM

It was 20th April 2020 (less than one year ago) when I first observed 19 Lyncis. 

I was very keen to do so when I discovered each one of its components are gravitationally moving together through space. 

www.stelledoppie.it states the whole system is a true triple. 

Very close by is another double called STF 1050. 

Through my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor both 19 Lyncis and STF 1050 are both cleanly separated at a mere 40X. 

So that's a triple - double. 

Therefore my special thanks goes to Hale Bopper for drawing out attention to 19 Lyncis (STF 1062). 

 

Clear skies, 

 

Aubrey.  


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