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classic super planetary scopes

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#126 CHASLX200

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Posted 16 February 2021 - 07:18 PM

 I personally design and make scopes for planetary work  that have a focal length of around 100" . The reason is you can get to the power required to see detail on them without the need for barlows and short focal length eyepieces with small field  view and short  eye relief.  

 

                   - Dave 

 

 

 I personally design and make scopes for planetary work  that have a focal length of around 100" . The reason is you can get to the power required to see detail on them without the need for barlows and short focal length eyepieces with small field  view and short  eye relief.  

 

                   - Dave 

Even my 14.5" Zambutos and 15" OMI optics needed a 2.5mm eyepiece and barlow to get to the powers i liked using on my best nites.  Wished my 18" Obsession was F/6 and not F/4.5.  A 5mm eyepiece last week did good on Mars with some detail seen.  We are pulling away from Mars fast now so not much action to be seen for a long time. I have no planets to look at really for a while. 
 


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#127 bierbelly

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Posted 16 February 2021 - 07:31 PM

Those are wonderful images of Mars! Still, I have a hard time equating imaging performance and visual performance. The two are not always perfectly equivocal due to things like light sensitivity, contrast, exposure, stacking, image manipulation and so forth.


And floaters...

#128 photoracer18

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Posted 16 February 2021 - 07:38 PM

I'm sorry I never got a chance to view thru the D&G 10" F34 that Barry built for Dr. Green on LI or the 12" F18 Barry built for him before he passed away. I bought his Jaegers 6" F15 while he was alive. Right now I have nothing bigger in an achro than my Carton 4" F13.


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#129 clamchip

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Posted 16 February 2021 - 09:09 PM

There's a few D&G 5 inch f/20's out there, I'd love to get my hands on one.

As far as I know Barry is not making lenses or telescopes anymore so we are at the mercy of 

the used market looking for a highly desirable in high demand.

I think amateurs should look for a apo, why torture one's self with a telescope that requires a 

huge mounting, leave the long achro's for us oldie moldy.

 

Robert 


Edited by clamchip, 17 February 2021 - 11:04 AM.

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#130 starman876

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Posted 17 February 2021 - 07:31 AM

Even my 14.5" Zambutos and 15" OMI optics needed a 2.5mm eyepiece and barlow to get to the powers i liked using on my best nites.  Wished my 18" Obsession was F/6 and not F/4.5.  A 5mm eyepiece last week did good on Mars with some detail seen.  We are pulling away from Mars fast now so not much action to be seen for a long time. I have no planets to look at really for a while. 
 

How is that Obsession on your back?



#131 highfnum

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Posted 17 February 2021 - 08:22 AM

"Those are wonderful images of Mars! Still, I have a hard time equating imaging performance and visual performance. The two are not always perfectly equivocal due to things like light sensitivity, contrast, exposure, stacking, image manipulation and so forth."

 

forgot "seeing"

 

IMHO main reason visual doesn't add up to stacking and wavelet processing

even large observatories like keck  were using this technique calling it "post adaptive processing" 

until true active adaptive optics were installed 

 

my favorite example of this is alpine rille 

on a good night i can see for fleeting moments the upper portion of rille only

with process i can get almost whole thing 

i checked with LRO photo and its pretty accurate

c925dayeille.jpg

 

 


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#132 icomet

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 02:54 PM

Still working on this project.

Can't show you people anything but the mirror.

 

Hope it works out easier than planned.

 

Clear Skies.

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  • f_8 Lockwood serial number  12.5 added sm.jpg

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#133 bjkaras

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 04:38 PM

Refractors in the affordable category are too small to be considered top-flight planetary scopes.  A 10" f/8 Newtonian with a world-class mirror can be had for a couple thousand $$$.  A refractor of that size is $100,000.  Even a 7" refractor is $15,000-$23,000 or so.

I have a 6” f12 D&G that I bought used. If I’d bought it new it would probably cost more than what I paid for my 10” f5 newt. It gives great views, but I only really use it for lunar and planetary because you really can’t beat aperture for deep sky, and the planetary views from my 10” are just as good or better because of the greater resolving power.


Edited by bjkaras, 18 February 2021 - 04:42 PM.

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#134 RalphMeisterTigerMan

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 07:34 PM

I can recall at least 2 "planet killers", One was an 8" F/8 built by the late Lance Oklovic (R.A.S.C. Vancouver centre). I'll never forget the "great" Mars opposition of Oct. 1988. Terrance Dickenson was giving a lecture at the Vancouver Planetarium and Space Centre. After the lecture, which was fascinating, many of the Van. members set up their telescopes by the Gordon Southham Observatory. Lance's 8" was amoung them and just blew everyone away.

 

The second one belonged to an old friend of mine, Gary Wolanski. It was an 12.5" F/8, the mirror was ground, polished and figured by Gary's Dad. One night while observing through it, I decided to try my Meade series 4000 14mm U.W.A. on the moon. I have never seen the moon that good.

 

Clear skies!

RalphMeisterTigerMan

 

BTW. Having many, many telescopes in your living is NOT hoarding. What you have is an Optical Museum!


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#135 starman876

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Posted 18 February 2021 - 09:54 PM

Over the years I have found that scopes I have owned  at one time or another provided views that were amazing.   The ones that have provided the most awesome views of the planets were as follows

 

13.1 coulter.  Amazing optics in that one

12.5 Porta ball.  Thought I was flying over Jupiter

5" F12 AP.  outstanding views of any object.  

6" F8 AP  Amazing scope for an early AP triplet

Meade 178 ED  Views of Saturn in the scope were razor sharp

Celestron orange C14  Image scale in these scopes is breathtaking.   Saturns moons were abundant. 

 

I do not have the coulter 13.1 or the AP 5" F12 anymore.  Wish I still did.  Depending on the seeing each scope would provide all there was to see for that night.    If I could find one scope that could do everything on any given night I would be very happy.


Edited by starman876, 18 February 2021 - 09:55 PM.

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