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TYC 660 420 carbon star observed

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#1 flt158

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Posted 17 February 2021 - 11:56 AM

Hello, enthusiasts of carbon stars. 

 

I set up my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor in my back garden on Tuesday 16th February 2021 to seek out the carbon star TYC 660 420 which is also known as DO 616. 

The Hipparcos satellite is responsible for the TYC designation. Whilst the DO designation refers to the Dearborn Observatory in Illinois, USA. 

I hope I'm correct on both those issues. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

 

The Right Ascension (RA) of TYC 660 420 is: 3 hours 37 minutes and 43.94 seconds. 

The Declination (Dec) is +11 degrees 13 arc minutes and 37.6 seconds. 

 

Some time ago I downloaded an Excel Spreadsheet which is set out in order of each of these carbon stars' RA starting at 00 Hours and finishing just short of 24 hours. 

Therefore it starts and ends in Cassiopeia. 

 

The C spectral class star TYC 660 420 is positioned in western Taurus near the double star AG 68 and I did print a detailed map from my Guide 9.1 DVD before I observed it.

It is the very first carbon star I came across from the western side of Taurus in the lowest RA.  

On this map I had to observe 4 stars which are arranged in slightly curved line. 

These stars and their magnitudes were TYC 660 410 (11.6), TYC 660 579 (11.8) and TYC 660 519 (10.5)

The target star is seriously faint at magnitude 11.3. 

But it presented itself at a very reasonable 112X between the first 2 stars above. 

As I increased to 225X the star did have a fairly decent orange colour.  

I was overjoyed when I had it all figured out.

 

DO 616 or TYC 660 420 is my 96th observed carbon star. 

Other carbon stars I have observed in the past in Taurus were: TT, TU and Y Tauri. 

So it is nice to add a 4th. 

 

I do promise the next carbon in Taurus will be a brighter one.  

 

Thank you for reading this report. 

Comments, corrections and images are very welcome. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 

 

 


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#2 hambone20

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 12:49 AM

I finally had some excellent clear sky last week and got in a few carbon stars.  Y Tauri and TU Tauri were not very impressive but I also saw and really enjoyed W Orionis and RT Orionis, especially the later which had a very nice orange color.

 

Thanks Aubrey for your always great reports.

 

Loren


Edited by hambone20, 19 February 2021 - 12:50 AM.

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#3 flt158

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 08:44 AM

Good work, Loren!

I am so delighted you have been checking these 4 carbon stars: Y and TU Tauri, W and RT Orionis.

The only one I have not observed at all is RT Ori.

 

But I very much thank you for your closing encouragement, Loren. 

It appears my recent observations are ruled by a carbon star. 

And I then seek out some double stars which are in the surrounding area.

 

Oh! By the way, that's a super scope you have. 

I wonder if you have it permanently mounted under a dome.   

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 



#4 Rutilus

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 10:53 AM

I also like to observe the Carbon stars. Around a decade ago I observed the star TX Piscium as it underwent

an occultation on the dark lunar limb. Here is a photo.

Attached Thumbnails

  • TX.jpg

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#5 hambone20

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 01:31 PM

I use the wheel barrow handles and ramps and load it into the back of my truck.  We are usually under skies that measure 21.3 to 21.7 on the meter. The scope is really easy to set up and collimate. 

 

That's a nice occultation picture.  Nice carbon star too.


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#6 flt158

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 03:56 PM

Hello, Rutilus. 

What a super image!!

 

It must be nearly 10 years ago when I attended a Sidewalk Astronomy session with the Irish Astronomical Society. 

Everyone was observing the Moon. 

But when I arrived with my scope, which I had taken out from the back of my car, I asked the question: can anyone see there is a carbon star near the Moon?

And so at that point I had everyone checking out TX Piscium. 

 

However I should state I have never observed an occultation of any carbon star or TX Piscium for that matter. 

 

And I also need to thank, Loren, for giving us these details about his scope and his truck.

Brilliant job, my friend. 

I'm sure you would have no difficulty in spotting TYC 660 420 and many other carbon stars. 

(I have set my limit to magnitude +13.0)

 

Very best regards,

 

Aubrey. 


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#7 Rutilus

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 10:34 AM

Hi Aubrey - the date of my photo was 16th November 2010. Doing an internet search tells me it

was a Tuesday. 


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#8 flt158

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 10:50 AM

Hello again, Rutilus. 

It was definitely a Friday with me. 

Therefore we are talking about 2 different dates. 

I would have to do a lot of digging through my personal diaries to discover when my conjunction occurred. 

But it certainly was not an occultation. 

 

Wait a minute. 

I found the date. 

It was Friday 26th October 2012. 

TX Psc was 2 degrees west of an 11 day old gibbous Moon. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 


Edited by flt158, 20 February 2021 - 10:51 AM.


#9 Voyager 3

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 11:14 PM

I also like to observe the Carbon stars. Around a decade ago I observed the star TX Piscium as it underwent

an occultation on the dark lunar limb. Here is a photo.

Wow what a nice picture for what a nice report ! 


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