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Hiking in Yellowstone in June - what to bring?

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#1 Lornet

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 08:23 AM

I will be bringing my Canon M50 and a decent carbon fiber tripod.  I have two EF-S lenses that I attach with an adapter to the EF-M mount -- an 18mm-55mm and a 55mm-200mm. 

 

It occurred to me that this was an opportunity for low light pollution skies that I shouldn't waste. 

Any suggestions on which lightweight tracking mount I could get to try and take images of the sky at night?

LT



#2 Chris K

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 08:36 AM

No experience with this but interesting option:

https://astrogeartod...tracking-mount/
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#3 Xeroid

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 11:11 AM

Big Black Bear defense...

 

lol.gif


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#4 JerryX

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 11:49 AM

I agree with the previous post. If you're outdoors at night in Yellowstone, be sure to keep bear spray handy, preferably on your belt so it's always handy. Also be very careful of any nearby thermal features--you don't want to accidentally fall into one in the dark.

 

Also be prepared to not recognize any constellations at first. Yellowstone has Bortle 1 skies and if you're used to seeing the constellations under Bortle 4-8 skies you'll be overwhelmed at first.


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#5 abcdefghii

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 11:59 AM

Also be prepared to not recognize any constellations at first. Yellowstone has Bortle 1 skies and if you're used to seeing the constellations under Bortle 4-8 skies you'll be overwhelmed at first.

I bet that can be both bewildering and awesome at the same time. I'm under Bortle 4 sky here and am amazed at how much can be seen on a really clear night, it's somewhat difficult to imagine just how much more can be seen under a Bortle 1. 



#6 JMW

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:10 PM

It's the grizzlies in Yellowstone to be more concerned about. I have dealt with black bears  in 30 years of backpacking. I have avoided backpacking in grizzly bear country. We have carried bear cans for food since the late 90s and have slept much better not having to deal with bears in camp.

 

If you are backpacking and not just day hiking I would limit myself to the camera and one or two lenses to enjoy the backpacking with less weight. I carried a Cannon 6D and a 16-35 f/4 lens for 20 days hiking the John Muir trail. You start to notice the extra weight after a while.

 

If you are just day hiking, then I would kept the mount or camera tracker in the car. There are plenty of dark places that you can get great night sky photos without needed to walk very far from the car.



#7 Lornet

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:14 PM

Guys, this is cloudy nights, not the sierra club. I don’t need advice on bear spray or camping equipment. 

 

Any suggestions on portable tech i could take with me for astro imaging?  I live in a city and I’ll be in Yellowstone with a decent tripod, DSLR, and average quality glass lenses.  I’d like to make the most of the opportunity. 

 

I want  to try my hand at shooting the night sky and I’m looking for advice on what to get.  Any advice on that?

 

LT



#8 dhaval

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:19 PM

It really depends on whether you are going hiking or imaging. If the primary goal is to hike, I would just take a wide field lens on a tracker (plenty of batteries). 

 

Cs



#9 Lornet

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:36 PM

dhaval, do you have a tracker you’d recommend?



#10 JMW

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:43 PM

I like the advice of this website regarding taking photos of the Milky Way. You don't need a tracker if you limit you exposure based on your focal length and sensor size.

 

https://www.lonelyspeck.com

 

I have an inexpensive Rokinon 12mm f/2 lens that I like to use for Milky Way shots. 

 

https://www.lonelysp...-ncs-cs-review/

 

It can be helpful if you camera supports a tethering to a tablet app. It may be easier to perfect focus while looking at a bigger screen.

 

If you already have a small motorized GEM mount you can always use it for a camera tracker. 


Edited by JMW, 23 February 2021 - 01:32 PM.

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#11 acommonsoul

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 01:02 PM

SkyGuider Pro or Sky-Watcher Adventurer would be my picks. Both of these trackers work well. I haven't used the Adventurer Pro, but I hear good things about it. The Sky Guider Pro has served me well for the time I had it.


Edited by acommonsoul, 23 February 2021 - 01:12 PM.

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#12 Lornet

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 01:32 PM

Thanks for that advice!  I think Cannon provides a pretty good app for tethering and remote operation that should work well.

 

LT



#13 abcdefghii

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 01:34 PM

For hiking and wide angle, you don't even need to go as big as a SkyGuider Pro, just the smaller SkyTracker Pro should be fine with a 200mm lens. I used to have one and was able to use a 300mm lens on it, albeit you have to be dialed right in with PA at that focal length. For the 18-55mm the OP has, the SkyTracker Pro will be more than capable and unless the 55-200mm is a boat anchor, likely fine with that as well.


Edited by abcdefghii, 23 February 2021 - 01:34 PM.

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#14 Seaquel47

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 04:11 PM

You should watch this video, it compares 3 different trackers.  FYI, I did a 4 day/night workshop with Peter last February in Utah.  He's an interesting guy and has a lot of experience with the Sky Guider Pro.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=yq4cohjBT-E


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