Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Planetary nebula IC 5148

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Stas Volskiy

Stas Volskiy

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 26 Apr 2019

Posted 23 February 2021 - 11:39 AM

Hello!

 

Planetary nebula IC 5148

 

Telescope/lens: ASA 40" Ritchey–Chretien
Camera: FLI Proline 16803 CCD Camera
Exposure and filters: OIII H-alpha RGB 26 hours total exposure
Location: Chilescope observatory, Chile
Image data acquired remotely
 

 

I`ve found the interesting article about this nebula  https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.01350.pdf.
In the article in Chapter 4.2 you can see a description of multiple outer faint halo rings around the nebula. The rings were worked out very well, also their centers are located close to the main star, but not exactly match with it. I represent the rings and their centers in the attachment.

 

get.jpg?insecure

 

 

Also, processing diagram is provided (On astrobin page).

Attached Thumbnails

  • Preview2.jpg
  • Rings_small.jpg

Edited by Stas Volskiy, 23 February 2021 - 11:40 AM.

  • Ptarmigan, edif300, George Simon and 26 others like this

#2 HunterofPhotons

HunterofPhotons

    Surveyor 1

  • *----
  • Posts: 1,507
  • Joined: 26 Apr 2008
  • Loc: Rhode Island, USA

Posted 23 February 2021 - 11:53 AM

Hello Stas,

That is an excellent capture and presentation.  The linked article was intriguing.

Well done, sir.

 

dan k.



#3 james7ca

james7ca

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,219
  • Joined: 21 May 2011
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:06 PM

Your processing and presentation were both really well done. Thanks for posting.



#4 NorthField

NorthField

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,014
  • Joined: 01 Jun 2017
  • Loc: SW Missouri

Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:55 PM

i spent a lot of time on M97 a couple years ago and when i saw your image it immediately made me think of old Hootie :)

 

great image!!



#5 BKMaynard

BKMaynard

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 405
  • Joined: 21 Feb 2013
  • Loc: Dupo, Il. (st.louis area)

Posted 23 February 2021 - 02:19 PM

Bravo!

#6 astroian

astroian

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 331
  • Joined: 21 Sep 2016
  • Loc: Swindon, UK

Posted 24 February 2021 - 03:37 AM

Great shot of an interesting object.

Cheers,
Ian

#7 umbarak

umbarak

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 10
  • Joined: 26 Feb 2014

Posted 24 February 2021 - 03:43 AM

Excellent capture and article. Thanks for sharing!



#8 Sacred Heart

Sacred Heart

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 711
  • Joined: 16 Aug 2020

Posted 24 February 2021 - 09:17 AM

You nailed that one.   your image scale is .27??  You had some good tracking yes??   How long were the subs and the guiding images??

                                That photo is like WOW.    Joe



#9 james7ca

james7ca

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,219
  • Joined: 21 May 2011
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 24 February 2021 - 11:33 AM

You nailed that one.   your image scale is .27??  You had some good tracking yes??   How long were the subs and the guiding images??

                                That photo is like WOW.    Joe

Well, the OP was using an observatory 40" Ritchey–Chretien telescope (not something that just any amateur is likely to own). I suspect that scope has pretty good guiding and tracking (as in, "It just works.").


Edited by james7ca, 24 February 2021 - 11:37 AM.


#10 Sacred Heart

Sacred Heart

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 711
  • Joined: 16 Aug 2020

Posted 24 February 2021 - 07:46 PM

Well, the OP was using an observatory 40" Ritchey–Chretien telescope (not something that just any amateur is likely to own). I suspect that scope has pretty good guiding and tracking (as in, "It just works.").

It just works.    I say it works rather well.    You are right a 40" scope let alone a RC is not you average scope, atleast in my neighborhood.   I will say, I was lucky enough to see a 24" RC,  I was told the optics weighed 300lb and the fork mount was 2000lb.     It is nice stuff and it is really nice to know how to operate it.  

 

    I'd still like to know how long was the sub exposure and how often the guiding scope was imaging for correction. 

  A .27 image scale, to me is insane.     Observatory class machinery no doubt.            Joe



#11 chrysalis

chrysalis

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 25,953
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2013
  • Loc: North Central NC

Posted 25 February 2021 - 06:42 AM

That's an amazing image :waytogo: !!!



#12 CHILESCOPE

CHILESCOPE

    Vendor (Chilescope)

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 95
  • Joined: 19 Nov 2015

Posted 27 February 2021 - 08:39 AM

It just works.    I say it works rather well.    You are right a 40" scope let alone a RC is not you average scope, atleast in my neighborhood.   I will say, I was lucky enough to see a 24" RC,  I was told the optics weighed 300lb and the fork mount was 2000lb.     It is nice stuff and it is really nice to know how to operate it.  

 

    I'd still like to know how long was the sub exposure and how often the guiding scope was imaging for correction. 

  A .27 image scale, to me is insane.     Observatory class machinery no doubt.            Joe

The subs in Ha and Oiii were 1200 sec. In rgb- 600 sec

The 1mRc is an AltAz telescope so it uses derotator to compensate the field rotation. So we are talking on 3-axis system.  It was not easy to make guiding work. ASA even changed their software. Also 300+ pointing model helps to position and track the object preciselly in different regions of sky. But the biggest problem is to find the guiding star (the FOV on guiding sensor is 3 arcmin or so). So we have developped special script that plate solve the field then looks for nearest sutable guiding star (mag 12 and brighter) and rotate the rotator to put the star on guiding sensor. If this does not help it slew the scope a bit (no more than 10% of FOV of main sensor - 2 arcmin). Combination of rotation and small slew makes autoguiding possible in 98% of cases. But PA in the image is determined by guider star, not by the user.  The guiding exposures are 5-20 sec automatically selected by ACP depending on star brightness

Attached Thumbnails

  • rotator.jpeg

Edited by CHILESCOPE, 27 February 2021 - 08:54 AM.

  • calypsob and ram812 like this

#13 calypsob

calypsob

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,149
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Virginia

Posted 27 February 2021 - 12:55 PM

Great job! Wow that 40” RC makes for a great grab n go. Im sure they were happy to have you and that on a plane flight to chile.

Seriously though, this is amazing textbook worthy data. I look forwards to seeing more of your future work, definitely subbing on abin.



#14 Sacred Heart

Sacred Heart

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 711
  • Joined: 16 Aug 2020

Posted 27 February 2021 - 03:28 PM

The subs in Ha and Oiii were 1200 sec. In rgb- 600 sec

The 1mRc is an AltAz telescope so it uses derotator to compensate the field rotation. So we are talking on 3-axis system.  It was not easy to make guiding work. ASA even changed their software. Also 300+ pointing model helps to position and track the object preciselly in different regions of sky. But the biggest problem is to find the guiding star (the FOV on guiding sensor is 3 arcmin or so). So we have developped special script that plate solve the field then looks for nearest sutable guiding star (mag 12 and brighter) and rotate the rotator to put the star on guiding sensor. If this does not help it slew the scope a bit (no more than 10% of FOV of main sensor - 2 arcmin). Combination of rotation and small slew makes autoguiding possible in 98% of cases. But PA in the image is determined by guider star, not by the user.  The guiding exposures are 5-20 sec automatically selected by ACP depending on star brightness

Thank you.  I know it takes a lot to get a picture like this.  All my life I have been fascinated on how something works. 

 

A friend of mine told me, his Dad told him,  " Anything worth having is worth a little work."    Seeing this picture makes it all worth while.   Thank you for sharing      Joe
 




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics