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Embarking on My DSO Journey

Astrometry Beginner Charts Observing
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8 replies to this topic

#1 tylersk90

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Posted Yesterday, 07:07 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I've got a new 45 BT 100mm on the way and I'm excited to start finding DSOs.  I do not have a GoTo or anything electronic of that nature (other than my phone).  How would you suggest I tackle my endeavor?  What is the best traditional method of calculating RA and DEC?  I use the Night Sky app, but it's not very precise and doesn't have coordinates.

 

Any other tips/tricks of the trade?

 

Clear skies,

 

Tyler


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#2 PirateMike

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Posted Yesterday, 07:27 PM

I would think that learning how to star hop would be the best method for that setup as most people who view (versus doing astrophotography) use and Alt/Az mount.

 

An Alt/Az mount moves in an up/down (Alt) and left/right (Az) direction, an equatorial mount works in Dec and Ra.

 

Star hopping requires that you find a known bright star and move from star to star until you get to where you want to view. I like to think of it as hopping on stones to cross a stream. It is quite fun and enjoyable.

 

You'll probably need a star map (star atlas) or some electronic version of the same to get started. A red light will help with keeping your eyes adapted to the dark.

 

Good luck with the binos and enjoy. waytogo.gif

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.


Edited by PirateMike, Yesterday, 07:39 PM.

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#3 scotsman328i

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Posted Yesterday, 07:30 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I've got a new 45 BT 100mm on the way and I'm excited to start finding DSOs.  I do not have a GoTo or anything electronic of that nature (other than my phone).  How would you suggest I tackle my endeavor?  What is the best traditional method of calculating RA and DEC?  I use the Night Sky app, but it's not very precise and doesn't have coordinates.

 

Any other tips/tricks of the trade?

 

Clear skies,

 

Tyler

Tyler, learn starhopping! It’s very rewarding to learn the night sky through a planisphere or even the night sky app. Research the sky the night you plan on viewing and give yourself a handful of objects you want to find. You get to search for them and enjoy the pride of discovering them in your eyepiece. Remember, a 100mm will make your search a little more demanding as you are using smaller aperture when searching certain DSOs, so choose brighter magnitude ones at first to tackle, then you can challenge yourself to dimmer ones. Things like M42, the Double-Double, the cluster in Gemini, the Dog Star cluster, the Beehive cluster are a few brighter ones to start with. Before you know it, you’ll soon discover you’re a Celestial Navigator! 


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#4 Fiske

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Posted Yesterday, 08:27 PM

Tyler,

 

Hopefully you have a 10x50 binocular as well? You will find low power, wide field views are a terrific asset for learning the night sky and how to star hop. Plus ideal for quick sessions when you don't have time to roll out the big guns.

 

Congrats on your new binocular and embarking in this wonderful hobby.

 

Fiske


Edited by Fiske, Yesterday, 08:27 PM.

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#5 Keith Rivich

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Posted Yesterday, 09:20 PM

Choose DSO's that are close to naked eye stars. Easy to find the field and let the star hopping begin!


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#6 vicm

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Posted Today, 12:27 AM

Get sky safari pro. Best 20 bucks you’ll spend. Add your scope and eyepieces into the equipment and it will show circles on the app.  This app has made star hopping to targets a breeze. 
 



#7 Voyager 3

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Posted Today, 01:07 AM

Get sky safari pro. Best 20 bucks you’ll spend.
 

When it's on offer .



#8 Dave Mitsky

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Posted Today, 02:00 AM

You may find some of the information on star-hopping and observing in my post (#22) at https://www.cloudyni...mers/?p=5184287 useful.  It includes a number of DSO lists.



#9 DSOGabe

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Posted Today, 01:46 PM

If you can mount a Telrad on it, starhopping will be much easier. 




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