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Quick Visual Question! ?

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#26 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 07:53 PM

Here's a star-hop to M42.  First, locate second-magnitude Alnitak (Zeta Orionis), the easternmost (lowest) of the stars in the Belt of Orion.  Slew about 3/4 of a degree southwestward (downward) to the fourth-magnitude multiple star Sigma Orionis.  From there, drop "down" two degrees to the open cluster NGC 1981.  Continuing southward will take you to NGC 1973-1975-1977 (the Running Man Nebula) and then M42.

 

I've attached a screen capture (click to enlarge) from Stellarium.

Attached Thumbnails

  • M42 and Orion.JPG


#27 KBHornblower

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 08:20 PM

I just now looked at M42-43 under a double whammy, severe light pollution combined with nearly full Moon, roughly double the Moon alone.  The inner part of the nebula around the Trapezium was vivid, while the skyglow washed out the fainter outer parts.  This was with my 17.5" f/5 scope with a 20mm eyepiece, about 113x.  A 10" f/5 with the same eyepiece would give the same surface brightness but of course a smaller image scale, about 64x.  Transparency is excellent.



#28 Linked-In-The-Stars

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 07:30 AM

Hey All, 

 

I'll try to quick answer some of the things recently brought up. Viking-I don't "believe" I've ever pushed or bumped my scope pretty hard, as really I only move it from inside to my deck outside but that's about it. As much as I would love to smash it, I really have to wait lol but seeing as how flimsy and unreliable that it's actually built is a bit of an understatement. My thought is it isn't quite set right on the secondary itself, but I will get to the bottom of it. 

 

Next, I did try using those hex's on the red dot itself, when I adjust the one that moves it horizontally, it doesn't move as much as I need it too given how far I am off. Same with the vertical adjustment, they just don't have that much adjustment built into them for how far I am off target. I have ordered a new one and a new collimation set so once all that arrives I will give that a go and see where I end up then, which in the long run like it was said, you build it how you want, so I am sure I will be happy with how it ends up. Thanks Again!! C.S...



#29 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 02:35 PM

There's an image of NGC 1981 and the rest of the Sword of Orion in the article at https://skyandtelesc...ion-the-hunter/



#30 Linked-In-The-Stars

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 07:39 AM

All I gotta say is you all are awesome with your help and responses. It amazes me the great community of people who drop their knowledge and help without a blink. So thank you all for that, as I am awaiting a different finder, it didn't stop me from getting out friday and saturday night. I think my persistence paid off because I was able to find the Orion nebulae, and within just a few mins after setting up outside with a full bright moon! Totally awesome, I can only imagine without the added light how vivid and bright it would actually be. I did look for some other stuff, clusters and double stars, couple blue giant superstars, everything was crystal clear in my EP's so it totally made my weekend. I was even able to grab a short video holding my phone to my EP of Orion. Lol. Totally worth it! Thank you all again and Clear skies! 


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#31 Linked-In-The-Stars

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 07:48 AM

Just wanted to add, I did use a 9mm, a 13mm, 1.25 ep's, and a 26mm, 33mm, and a 56mm ep all 2". To be frank, I totally preferred the wfov over the higher powered eyepieces. I may have been able to see a few more stars, maybe but not much, but there wasn't a whole lot of difference, I was surprised by those big 2" ep's clarity and the views I got with them. waytogo.gif


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#32 aeajr

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 09:09 AM

As you gain experience you will also learn how to more quickly and more effectively find things in the sky, especially things you can't see with your eyes alone.

 

 

Seven Ways To Find Things In the Sky
https://www.cloudyni...e-there-others/

 

That 10" Lightbridge is a powerful scope.  You have a lifetime of enjoyment ahead of you, but it is going to take work and practice to learn how to get the most from it. 

 

My other hobby is flying RC aircraft.  I assure you I crashed many a plan before gaining a level of confidence where crashing was no longer a constant fear.  

 

It just takes time and practice.  Go for the easy stuff first, hone your skills, before you start going for the hard targets, like galaxies and dim nebula.


Edited by aeajr, 01 March 2021 - 09:11 AM.


#33 Ulmer Spatz

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 09:55 AM

 As much as I would love to smash it, I really have to wait lol but seeing as how flimsy and unreliable that it's actually built is a bit of an understatement. My thought is it isn't quite set right on the secondary itself, but I will get to the bottom of it.

The red dot finder may be perfectly fine. It may not align with the scope because:

 

1. The finder was not or could not be attached properly to its stalk by the owner.

2. The finder shoe attached by the factory to the scope is not parallel with the optical axis of the scope.

 

Both of these issues are fixable. Issue 1 would only take a disassembly, inspection and proper reassembly. Issue 2 would take an alignment of the finder shoe. To do that, you can use the finder as the alignment tool. To use it as such, first adjust it more or less to its middle vertical and middle horizontal position.

 

If you use red dot finders with both eyes open, they allow you to see a huge chunk of the sky along with your red dot. That's significant, especially for a beginner. If you replace the red dot finder with an optical finder scope, issue 2 would give give you grief with the optical finder as well. I don't know what you mean by "on the secondary." It probably refers to something I described in 1 and 2 above. But I'm not sure.


Edited by Ulmer Spatz, 02 March 2021 - 07:18 AM.

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#34 Mrcloc

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 01:45 AM

In addition, I think it would be more difficult to align a magnified finder in these cases.

 

I've seen people mount their green laser as a finder. I'd love to try that - it looks quite interesting, but those lasers eat batteries for breakfast.




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