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Supernova database: what do you recommend ?

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#1 erick86

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 10:29 PM

I’m wondering what people like to use for monitoring supernovae. It’s an area of astronomy that I’ve not really learned much about, and specifically I’d be interested in seeing a supernova.

I would imagine that there are the occasional ones that’s become brighter than a magnitude of 14 or 15?

Has anyone here made visual observations of a supernova? Would love to hear about it.

Eric

#2 havasman

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 11:21 PM

http://www.rochester.../supernova.html

 

Observing them can be as difficult as any observation. And they can also be apparent in a field. I think they're fascinating.


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#3 AstroBrett

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 11:41 PM

This is what I use to monitor these and other ephemeral phenomenon:

 

http://www.astronomerstelegram.org/

 

Brett


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#4 Redbetter

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 12:42 AM

http://www.rochester.../supernova.html

 

Observing them can be as difficult as any observation. And they can also be apparent in a field. I think they're fascinating.

 

Yep, this is the staring point for my SN observing lists each month.   It helps to also look at the "Active supernova page" on that link.  I sift through positions in the sky, and where the SN are in a galaxy to determine which ones might be detectable with my scope.

 

There are usually several bright ones each year although not all are well placed for observation.  To get an idea of frequency, look at the "Statistics" pages by year.  For the bright ones I sometimes bring a good 60 - 80mm scope to the dark site to make an observation.  I have seen a number this way.


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#5 orionic

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 03:54 PM

Re: "To get an idea of frequency, look at the "Statistics" pages by year."

 

Looks like 2020 was an above-average year, with 5 brighter than 13th magnitude.  Best year by that measure since 2013, when there were 6.

 

I will add that supernovas are the single nicest surprise since I started amateur astronomy just a few years ago - not something I ever thought once about prior to entering this hobby.  It is not hard to see at least a couple every year - if you had asked me to guess before, I would have thought they'd be extremely rare events.

 

The only mystery to me is it seems to be a "niche" interest here, with not a large amount of traffic on the forum.


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#6 VariableBob

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 03:11 PM

I have observed a number of supernova. Unfortunately there have not been any in our home galaxy for many centuries.  Being a visual observer I am limited by the light gathering power of my telescope and my old eyes so my cut off is bout mag 12.5.  I have managed to observe one every four or five years.  Larger telescope more options.  I get my alerts through the AAVSO.  Here is an interesting link.

https://www.scientif...acles-in-space/


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#7 StanH

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 05:18 PM

I’m wondering what people like to use for monitoring supernovae. It’s an area of astronomy that I’ve not really learned much about, and specifically I’d be interested in seeing a supernova.

I would imagine that there are the occasional ones that’s become brighter than a magnitude of 14 or 15?

Has anyone here made visual observations of a supernova? Would love to hear about it.

Eric

There are several of us who have made visual observations of well over 100 supernovae over the years.  The two sites already mentioned have been invaluable in determining what supernovae are bright enough to be observed.

 

Also, check out the supernova threads on this forum to get an idea of what is currently being observed.  Usually, there is a new one each month.


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#8 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 01:37 AM

Has anyone here made visual observations of a supernova? Would love to hear about it.

Eric

I've observed quite a few supernovae over the years, including SN 2011fe in M101, which grew bright enough to be seen through 10x50s.

 

On the night of June 24th, 2017, I was able to observe three different supernovae (SN 2017eaw in NGC 6946, SN 2017erp in NGC 5681, and SN 2017emq in the surprisingly bright galaxy UGC 5369) through a friend's 24" Starmaster Dob at Cherry Springs State Park.


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