Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Unknown Leitz Bino from Japan

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 CasioCentro

CasioCentro

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2021

Posted 26 February 2021 - 08:31 AM

Dear all,

 

I found a pair of unknown Ernst Leitz binoculars today.

My curiosity over this item grew more and more now.

The plate reads 

 

8x L9

115 = 6.5

 

That is all. 

The Leitz logo is somewhat free-handed, and no sign of screws as far as I can see.

I dug up the following list from an old thread, and I suspect it's one of the Binom family, but may be later because condition is just too good.

 

8  x 24 | Binom      | 6.5deg|      | 1913 | $45 IF. also military version. 115yd/1000yd. 17 oz.
8  x 24 | Binomia    | 6.5deg|      | 1913 | $50 CF. 115yd/1000yd. 18 oz.
8  x 24 | Binoma     |       | 1914 | 1914 | heavier than Binom
8  x 24 | Binomat    |       | 1914 | 1914 | CF. heavier than Binomia
8  x 26 | Binom      |       | 1914 |~1926 | IF. also monocular Monom. same name as earlier 8 x 24

 

(These names remind me of old Latin grammar textbook... and gives me even more headache.)

 

I have attached photographs as reference.

 

Looking forward to hearing from fellow enthusiasts!

Attached Thumbnails

  • a.jpg
  • b.jpg
  • c.jpg

  • Foss and j.gardavsky like this

#2 FrankL

FrankL

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 714
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

Posted 26 February 2021 - 02:14 PM

That’s a nice and somewhat rare binocular in quite good condition. The 8405 serial number indicates manufacture in 1914.  8x is obviously the power of the binocular. L9 is an abbreviation for Lichtstarke (light strength) 9 which is an outdated measure of binocular performance calculated by squaring the binocular’s exit pupil i.e. 24/8 = 3 and 3 squared = 9. And 6.5 degrees is the field of view  showing an area of 115 meters at 1,000 meters. It is probably either a Binomia (most likely) or Binomat model. The lack of any cover plate screws seems unusual especially in a well-built binocular like this one, but I strongly suspect there is a second, more robust, cover plate underneath the exterior one that is visible. The exterior plate is held in place by the objective barrel or ocular tube with a lot of sealant underneath. I’ve attached a picture of a Leitz binocular also made in 1914 in my collection showing what I mean about the second cover plate. DSC01217 (753x800).jpg


Edited by FrankL, 26 February 2021 - 02:31 PM.

  • Foss and CasioCentro like this

#3 FrankL

FrankL

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 714
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

Posted 26 February 2021 - 02:21 PM

The interior cover plate removed: DSC01220 (1) (800x570).jpg

 


  • Foss likes this

#4 FrankL

FrankL

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 714
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

Posted 26 February 2021 - 02:26 PM

Note the similarity of the markings on this binocular to those on yours. 

DSC01198 (1024x722).jpg


  • Foss and j.gardavsky like this

#5 CasioCentro

CasioCentro

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2021

Posted 26 February 2021 - 04:09 PM

That’s a nice and somewhat rare binocular in quite good condition. The 8405 serial number indicates manufacture in 1914.  8x is obviously the power of the binocular. L9 is an abbreviation for Lichtstarke (light strength) 9 which is an outdated measure of binocular performance calculated by squaring the binocular’s exit pupil i.e. 24/8 = 3 and 3 squared = 9. And 6.5 degrees is the field of view  showing an area of 115 meters at 1,000 meters. It is probably either a Binomia (most likely) or Binomat model. The lack of any cover plate screws seems unusual especially in a well-built binocular like this one, but I strongly suspect there is a second, more robust, cover plate underneath the exterior one that is visible. The exterior plate is held in place by the objective barrel or ocular tube with a lot of sealant underneath. I’ve attached a picture of a Leitz binocular also made in 1914 in my collection showing what I mean about the second cover plate. attachicon.gifDSC01217 (753x800).jpg

Thank you FrankL!

 

I now see that there are 2nd plates in under layer. Very fascinating.

What kind of reference books do you have on Leitz binoculars, I wonder?

Or you just "know" these details through disassembly?

 

Cheers!



#6 FrankL

FrankL

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 714
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

Posted 26 February 2021 - 11:01 PM

There’s not much written about the history of Leitz civilian model binoculars. Dr. Hans Seeger in his books gives some good information about many of the military models. I’ve collected and serviced examples and corresponded with other collectors and have learned about them this way. Old catalogues, sales pamphlets and advertisements are also a good source of information. 


  • j.gardavsky and CasioCentro like this

#7 CasioCentro

CasioCentro

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2021

Posted 27 February 2021 - 01:13 AM

There’s not much written about the history of Leitz civilian model binoculars. Dr. Hans Seeger in his books gives some good information about many of the military models. I’ve collected and serviced examples and corresponded with other collectors and have learned about them this way. Old catalogues, sales pamphlets and advertisements are also a good source of information. 

Understand very well.

I will start gathering books from eBay and AbeBooks!

 

Kind regards,




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics