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Right side up for guide camera

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#1 KarthikNagaraj

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 11:22 AM

Is there a specific way to put the guide camera to be right side up? Perhaps some indication with the lettering logo and name on the camera with respective to the scope. Right now when I sleep my mount down the guiding camera in sharpcap moved diagonally down. I have tried rotating it and when I do that i lose focus. Is there a way I should be doing this focus + field rotation correctly?

Zwo asi290mm camera
Zwo 30f4 scope
Cgx mount

Thanks

K

#2 james7ca

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 11:36 AM

If the focuser rotates the camera then you need to use some other method to rotate the entire guide scope (perhaps within its rings) or you can use a thin spacer (0.5 to 1mm) between the threads on the camera and the guide scope to adjust where the threading stops as you screw the camera onto the guide scope (which will also change focus but depending upon the threading on the focuser you will probably end up with a different orientation of the camera). As far as orientation, usually the USB port and the label indicates either the horizontal or vertical orientation of the sensor.



#3 gcardona

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 11:41 AM

The orientation doesn't really matter unless you are anal about it being orthogonal to the scope's axis of rotation. The guiding software will calibrate and figure it out.



#4 KarthikNagaraj

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 11:46 AM

Thanks for the reply. Gabe, that's what I thought but its really annoying to see the difference in orientation of the mount slewing in the opposite direction of the guide scope. Not to mention the fact that my DSLR mounted to the lens has its own field orientation. 



#5 KarthikNagaraj

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 11:47 AM

James, thanks 

 

If the focuser rotates the camera then you need to use some other method to rotate the entire guide scope (perhaps within its rings) or you can use a thin spacer (0.5 to 1mm) between the threads on the camera and the guide scope to adjust where the threading stops as you screw the camera onto the guide scope (which will also change focus but depending upon the threading on the focuser you will probably end up with a different orientation of the camera). As far as orientation, usually the USB port and the label indicates either the horizontal or vertical orientation of the sensor.

Thanks. I will check it out. 



#6 rgsalinger

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 12:09 PM

Well, I would look at the chip and then put a piece of tape on the camera to show how the chip is oriented. If you are going to set up each night and need to reinsert the camera each time, use another piece of tape (or a par focal ring) for that.

Rgrds-Ross



#7 KarthikNagaraj

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 12:16 PM

Well, I would look at the chip and then put a piece of tape on the camera to show how the chip is oriented. If you are going to set up each night and need to reinsert the camera each time, use another piece of tape (or a par focal ring) for that.

Rgrds-Ross

yup. got to do that. thanks



#8 ram812

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 12:47 PM

Well, I would look at the chip and then put a piece of tape on the camera to show how the chip is oriented. If you are going to set up each night and need to reinsert the camera each time, use another piece of tape (or a par focal ring) for that.
Rgrds-Ross


Can phd2's settings allow for daytime use to see what the orientation of the camera sensor is before going out at night/ first light? I'm setting up a refractor/helical guide scope/ SSAG on a GEM, sure would save some dark sky time and hassle!😉. Bit different than on a newt with mirrors and all.
Didn't mean to jack the thread...
CS, Ralph

#9 KarthikNagaraj

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 01:11 PM

Can phd2's settings allow for daytime use to see what the orientation of the camera sensor is before going out at night/ first light? I'm setting up a refractor/helical guide scope/ SSAG on a GEM, sure would save some dark sky time and hassle!. Bit different than on a newt with mirrors and all.
Didn't mean to jack the thread...
CS, Ralph

Actually that might be a great idea. Let me try that out today - I will just get some distant object in focus to get an orientation. 


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#10 dx_ron

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 01:39 PM

At the suggestion of another CNer, I installed the free version of Sharpcap. For the ASI120mm-mini, at least, it can crank the exposure down to microseconds and you get daytime live video. Very handy for finding guidescope focus and it would work great for orientation as well.


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#11 ram812

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 02:43 PM

I'm going to have to try Sharpcap out. I have used ASPA via the HC and that's cool but I understand SC has lots of other features that I'd like to try out. Great suggestion.

#12 rgsalinger

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 03:39 PM

It's not a question of PHD's settings you just have to knock down the gain in the camera to a very low level and take short exposures. I still think that what you need to do is to use a piece of tape so the chip orientation which is the only issue is orthogonal to the RA and DEC axes. 



#13 RogerM

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 03:52 PM

For daytime I just use the ASI Studio app, that allows for gain and exposure control and works for all ASI cameras (that I know of.)

 

It would be nice if the actual FOV output from my guidescope/guide-camera would maintain proper orthogonality to the Cardinal directions (N, S, E, W) for any given position along RA and/or DEC (auto field rotator?), much like what the sky appears to the naked eye no matter which direction we look up at.


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#14 ram812

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 11:42 PM

For daytime I just use the ASI Studio app, that allows for gain and exposure control and works for all ASI cameras (that I know of.)

It would be nice if the actual FOV output from my guidescope/guide-camera would maintain proper orthogonality to the Cardinal directions (N, S, E, W) for any given position along RA and/or DEC (auto field rotator?), much like what the sky appears to the naked eye no matter which direction we look up at.



This is true, " No matter where in the sky we are looking". Like image erecting eyepiece or " Correct orientation", that's the golden goose, if you will!

#15 SonnyE

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 12:53 AM

Personally, I don't care as long as my imaging camera, and my guiding camera move the same direction when I'm doing my adjustments.

That makes it much easier for me to bring a star into the FOV of the main telescope and it's camera.

 

Besides, who's going to see it in the dark? Performance over appearance.

 

8 In The Dark W
 
7 Red LED W

 



#16 Jarno

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 05:25 AM

The orientation of your guide cam can make a (very) small difference if the pixels aren't square as it'll have slightly higher resolution in one direction. I however doubt it'll make a practical difference. If you want to know your chips orientation while the camera is in the scope, why not look at the USB port? I know that on my ASI 120mm the USB port is parallel to the long side of the sensor so if, for whatever reason, I want my sensor to be oriented a certain way I just rotate it so the USB port is in the desired direction. But that's before starting an imaging session of course since I see no reason to bother rotating it during imaging. All that would achieve is that you have to re-calibrate the guiding and make yourself lose valuable imaging time.

 

Jarno


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