Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Buying my beginner telescope! Need advise! >.<

Beginner Celestron Dob
  • Please log in to reply
72 replies to this topic

#26 CarolinaBanker

CarolinaBanker

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 182
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Eastern North Carolina

Posted 27 February 2021 - 03:49 PM

Why not get the 102AZ DX StarSense refractor? Easy to use and it’s a decently sized refractor.



#27 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 95,957
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 27 February 2021 - 06:06 PM

The 10" Bintel OTA (optical tube assembly) weighs 16 kilograms and its Dob base weighs 14 kilograms.  The two pieces can be set up separately or some sort of cart or dolly can be employed to roll the entire telescope about in one piece.

https://www.bintel.c...?v=322b26af01d5

If so many Dobs are bought and then go unused, the market for previously owned Dobs would be enough to supply the current shortage. wink.gif


  • Jethro7 likes this

#28 jjbag

jjbag

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 534
  • Joined: 28 Feb 2017
  • Loc: Mid Atlantic

Posted 27 February 2021 - 06:17 PM

The problem with a big Dob is that they are so heavy and take so much time to set up—that they don’t hit the backyard very often. From my very limited experience, it appears that most big Dobs never see the night sky after the first year. Every big Dob owner I know loves the views but hates the setup. So, the big beautiful light buckets just sit unused in a garage or basement.

My 10 XTI from my garage to the yard and setup takes 2 mins on a bad day. 1 Dolly rolling through yard (40 seconds) the other minute and a half to verify the collimation. These are not 20 inch truss tub dobs. Compare that to my etx 80 lugging the tripod then getting the actual telescope to lay on the tripod then aligning the go to .. um, takes less time for the dob and less hassle.



#29 GoFish

GoFish

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,390
  • Joined: 30 Nov 2016
  • Loc: Wisconsin

Posted 27 February 2021 - 07:01 PM

My 10 XTI from my garage to the yard and setup takes 2 mins on a bad day. 1 Dolly rolling through yard (40 seconds) the other minute and a half to verify the collimation. These are not 20 inch truss tub dobs. Compare that to my etx 80 lugging the tripod then getting the actual telescope to lay on the tripod then aligning the go to .. um, takes less time for the dob and less hassle.

+1

 

I made an inexpensive “proof of concept” dolly a couple years ago. Used scrap 2x4’s and a leftover piece of Baltic birch plywood, plus 4” locking casters purchased from Lowe’s. Works well enough that I still use it in its original configuration (minus the adjustable leveling feet I thought I’d need, but don't). 

 

My XT10 + dolly lives in the garage, under a plastic bag. It can be wheeled to the driveway and ready for observing in just a few minutes. I enjoy using a scope that reliably lets me see Trapezium E and F with virtually no effort. Not sure I can say that about any other scope I own. 



#30 Sheol

Sheol

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 885
  • Joined: 20 Mar 2010

Posted 27 February 2021 - 07:21 PM

                           The Dob may become more than a starter 'Scope, it may become a lifetime. With a good set of EPs & filters, that will be a Planet Killer & a decent starter for DSOs. Plus, you can always add upgrades to it. 

                           And collimating a solid tube Dob is not a monster chore. My 8 inch has held collimation for a decade!. The only thing I see being a problem is it may be too heavy.

                           If you cannot yet identify any bright stars, any GOTO 'Scope is still just a dust collector until you learn the basics. The books suggested are excellent starting areas. Also, get a decent Star Atlas. Something between 6.0 to 8.0 Magnitude. That will catch anything you are likely to want to see right away.

 

                             Clear Skies,

                                  Matt.


  • Spile and Jokerb12 like this

#31 Jethro7

Jethro7

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,776
  • Joined: 17 Dec 2018
  • Loc: N.W. Florida

Posted 27 February 2021 - 08:10 PM

I think you have 2 bad choices—for a 1st scope—here.

If the 127 is a bad design (and I have no idea if that is true), there are better choices in the same size/price range. I would recommend a 127mm Mak. I love the views in mine! It is light, easy to set up, and hits the backyard often. I have other scopes, but this one gets the most use.

The problem with a big Dob is that they are so heavy and take so much time to set up—that they don’t hit the backyard very often. From my very limited experience, it appears that most big Dobs never see the night sky after the first year. Every big Dob owner I know loves the views but hates the setup. So, the big beautiful light buckets just sit unused in a garage or basement.

Hello MaknMe,

I totally agree on the Celestron 127. I disagree with your assessment of a 10" Dob. I have a  had  8" 10" and now I have a 12" Dob. I simply transport it around on a cheap hand truck. Wheel it out plunk it down and off to wonderland I go, it takes me about 10 min. to set up and put away when I am done. The 12" Dob is by far the easiest scope and mount I own to set up and take down and stowe.  It can be stored vertically and it really does not take up much room in the house. I miss the 10" Dob ( I should have kept that one) it was easy to transport to a dark sky site the 12" Dob will not fit into my Honda Civic so it stays home. 

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 27 February 2021 - 08:11 PM.


#32 Jokerb12

Jokerb12

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 13
  • Joined: 26 Feb 2021

Posted 27 February 2021 - 11:14 PM

Firstly, i want to thank everyone for commenting and helping me make my decision. 

Im in Australia. and i think ill go with the Dob 10". 

i guess the reason i really wanted that 127az is because its got a starsense guide. but no matter what i will still need to learn how to navigate on my own. so ill just go straight for the 10" Dob. im only 25, so the weight is no problem for me.

But overall, again. thank you everyone for helping!


  • DouglasPaul and radiofm74 like this

#33 SpaceConqueror3

SpaceConqueror3

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,084
  • Joined: 19 Sep 2013
  • Loc: Phinney Ridge, Seattle, WA

Posted 27 February 2021 - 11:50 PM

Neither is my answer. These aren't the only two telescopes out there, Being a newbie, get something more manageable than the 10" to learn with. Keep combing you local Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace. You'll soon find a much better and probably cheaper option.



#34 Tfer

Tfer

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 323
  • Joined: 05 Sep 2019
  • Loc: Northern Alberta, Canada

Posted 28 February 2021 - 12:25 AM

Binoculars and a copy of Nightwatch, by Terence Dickinson. 
 

You can either be an active or passive observer.  An active observer understands how the sky works, while a passive one uses goto and doesn’t really know anything.

 

Strive to be active.

 

A goto scope is great when you’re ready, but it’s crippling when you’re first starting out.

 

I've got some superb scopes, and have been using telescopes since I was growing up during the Apollo era, but I’ve also got 6 pairs of binoculars that get pulled out regularly.  Save yourself some money right now, and get the book and binos. 
 

The investment will pay off in spades. 


  • radiofm74 and Hexley like this

#35 radiofm74

radiofm74

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 265
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2021
  • Loc: Milano (Italy)

Posted 28 February 2021 - 02:46 AM

Firstly, i want to thank everyone for commenting and helping me make my decision. 

Im in Australia. and i think ill go with the Dob 10". 

i guess the reason i really wanted that 127az is because its got a starsense guide. but no matter what i will still need to learn how to navigate on my own. so ill just go straight for the 10" Dob. im only 25, so the weight is no problem for me.

But overall, again. thank you everyone for helping!

Excellent! Happy you decided against the Bird-Jones!

As for the Dob, I think the mix of answers you got does not necessarily come from disagreement.

If you live under relatively good skies, in a house with a backyard, unimpeded views and a garage or better still a tool shed where you can keep the scope, a 10" Dob seems perfect.

If like me you live in an apartment in a severely light polluted area, have to set-up in a balcony and want to be able to take your scope without too much hassle away under darker skies, a Dob might be the wrong choice: too big for the apartment, sitting too low to clear visual obstacles like the balcony railings, too big to fit the trunk of my car with the rest of the luggage… 

Another important consideration: a Dob or any other alt/az mount does not give you the ability to manually track objects.

 

So, my suggestion would still be to go and look a little harder to what's on the market, and choose according to your situation, needs and budget. But of course, if the Dob ticks all the boxes, go for it!


Edited by radiofm74, 28 February 2021 - 02:46 AM.


#36 MaknMe

MaknMe

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 183
  • Joined: 11 May 2020

Posted 28 February 2021 - 12:41 PM

And, no matter which scope you end up purchasing, please come back and let us know the many wonderful things you see.

One of the great things about CN is reading the First Light reports.
  • radiofm74 likes this

#37 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 95,957
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 28 February 2021 - 12:51 PM

I certainly agree that a 10" Dob is not the telescope of choice if the potential owner is going to observe from a balcony or if stairs are involved in taking it outdoors.


  • radiofm74 and Hexley like this

#38 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,480
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 28 February 2021 - 08:14 PM

Firstly, i want to thank everyone for commenting and helping me make my decision. 

Im in Australia. and i think ill go with the Dob 10". 

i guess the reason i really wanted that 127az is because its got a starsense guide. but no matter what i will still need to learn how to navigate on my own. so ill just go straight for the 10" Dob. im only 25, so the weight is no problem for me.

But overall, again. thank you everyone for helping!

Make sure you add the degree circles mentioned in a previous post.  They will work as well as the starsense for finding stuff

https://www.cloudyni...degree-circles/

 

Read the following on collimation

https://garyseronik....to-collimation/

https://garyseronik....pe-collimation/

 

A hand cart is a wonderful way to move a big dob around.

 

I assume the dob will have a 2" focuser.  Look into a wide angle lower magnification 2" eyepiece to get wide field views and to help with navigation.



#39 Hexley  Happy Birthday!

Hexley

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 175
  • Joined: 24 Jan 2021
  • Loc: South Florida

Posted 28 February 2021 - 08:27 PM

10” Dobs are very heavy. A 30 pound optical tube isn’t convenient, it’s large and unwieldy. What’s your home situation? Do you roll it out from the garage and observe from the driveway? are you up multiple flights of stairs?

 

I’d recommend an 8” Dob over a 10” for newbies. They’re much lighter and under typical city light pollution show about the same as a 10”... they’re also not divas about what eyepieces you use. 
 

You’re spending a pile of money, consider if you want a GoTo telescope. The fact is, it’s nice to have a scope that will track solar system objects through the night. It’s super convenient, but yes, usually more expensive. I love my Dob, but some nights I don’t want to be the nudging motor drive. A lot of Dob enthusiasts will sing it from the rooftops, then you realize they’ve got a trussed, 14” GoTo model and the last time they manually slewed their Dob was decades ago. Don’t necessarily trust the teacher with a motorcycle who tells you to ride a fixed gear bicycle, you don’t have to learn the skies much to also enjoy the luxury of a GoTo telescope  


Edited by Hexley, 28 February 2021 - 08:28 PM.

  • Bigal1817 likes this

#40 DrivingOnTheMoon

DrivingOnTheMoon

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 13
  • Joined: 21 Feb 2021

Posted 28 February 2021 - 09:46 PM

I'm very new myself. Did a lot of research years ago but never got a scope. Came back around recently and finally got one. I'm so glad that went with a GoTo mount. Using the controller to slew around is actually quite enjoyable and steady. I don't miss using a DOB at all. Having the GoTo feature is absolutely great. Going easily from the moon, to Mars, to Orions nebulae, and even pointing at some Messiers that I couldn't see, it was great just knowing, hey, it's out there, I'm pointing in the right direction and not shooting in the dark. I use binoculars with it so I can get wider field views and I know right where to aim then. It's still very new, but I don't think I'll have any regrets having gotten a GoTo scope instead of a big Dob.
  • Hexley likes this

#41 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 95,957
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 28 February 2021 - 09:55 PM

10” Dobs are very heavy. A 30 pound optical tube isn’t convenient, it’s large and unwieldy. What’s your home situation? Do you roll it out from the garage and observe from the driveway? are you up multiple flights of stairs?

 

I’d recommend an 8” Dob over a 10” for newbies. They’re much lighter and under typical city light pollution show about the same as a 10”... they’re also not divas about what eyepieces you use. 
 

You’re spending a pile of money, consider if you want a GoTo telescope. The fact is, it’s nice to have a scope that will track solar system objects through the night. It’s super convenient, but yes, usually more expensive. I love my Dob, but some nights I don’t want to be the nudging motor drive. A lot of Dob enthusiasts will sing it from the rooftops, then you realize they’ve got a trussed, 14” GoTo model and the last time they manually slewed their Dob was decades ago. Don’t necessarily trust the teacher with a motorcycle who tells you to ride a fixed gear bicycle, you don’t have to learn the skies much to also enjoy the luxury of a GoTo telescope  

The problem is that, with the current shortage of available astronomy gear, the OP was choosing between a 127mm Bird-Jones reflector and the 10" Bintel Dob.



#42 Bigal1817

Bigal1817

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 120
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 28 February 2021 - 11:22 PM

I like big dobs plus small, easy-to-use grab n' go setups, you've found one of each!  For me, I started with a small grab n' go and used it for a couple of years. In that time, I found objects I enjoy observing, and basic information about telescope ownership (e.g. where to store, where to use, how to transport between, etc.). After 2 years, I bought an 8" Dob and I love it. Sometimes, it's cold, partly cloudy, the moon is out, or whatever - I still use the grab n' go. In my opinion, a good backyard astronomer becomes a collector of useful telescopes.  My advice is to buy both!  Buy one now and the other in a year or two. 

 

In my case, buying the small telescope helped me stay in this hobby and I am not sure that would be the case if I started the other way around. Only you can say what works for you.



#43 Hexley  Happy Birthday!

Hexley

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 175
  • Joined: 24 Jan 2021
  • Loc: South Florida

Posted 28 February 2021 - 11:30 PM

The problem is that, with the current shortage of available astronomy gear, the OP was choosing between a 127mm Bird-Jones reflector and the 10" Bintel Dob.

Oh no doubt, but I've seen 8" Dobs become available on and off through various sites, if you look, they pop up here and there. Still, the 10" is a big telescope... if he's never owned one, that could easily be more than he wants to chew.



#44 Pokemoncrusher1

Pokemoncrusher1

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 111
  • Joined: 11 Dec 2020

Posted 28 February 2021 - 11:42 PM

Instead of 600 for a heavyer dob, you can get a 8 inch AD8 for around 500 and that will give you everything you need to start, you can use the extra 100 for a red dot finder and other accesories. Dobsonians are really not that hard to use, the ad8 comes with a a laser collimator and once aligned can be used to easily collimate the dobsonian, 


  • Hexley likes this

#45 Pokemoncrusher1

Pokemoncrusher1

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 111
  • Joined: 11 Dec 2020

Posted 28 February 2021 - 11:44 PM

I'm very new myself. Did a lot of research years ago but never got a scope. Came back around recently and finally got one. I'm so glad that went with a GoTo mount. Using the controller to slew around is actually quite enjoyable and steady. I don't miss using a DOB at all. Having the GoTo feature is absolutely great. Going easily from the moon, to Mars, to Orions nebulae, and even pointing at some Messiers that I couldn't see, it was great just knowing, hey, it's out there, I'm pointing in the right direction and not shooting in the dark. I use binoculars with it so I can get wider field views and I know right where to aim then. It's still very new, but I don't think I'll have any regrets having gotten a GoTo scope instead of a big Dob.

The thing is for the same price you can get a dobsonian with much better views and just put setting circles on it, setting circles are a bit more work than goto but its worth it considering the views you get, also goto dobsonians are absolutely a thing.



#46 DouglasPaul

DouglasPaul

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 484
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Monroe Washington

Posted 01 March 2021 - 12:08 AM

Oh no doubt, but I've seen 8" Dobs become available on and off through various sites, if you look, they pop up here and there. Still, the 10" is a big telescope... if he's never owned one, that could easily be more than he wants to chew.

My first telescope was a ten inch dob. I use all that I have weather allowing. You either have the desire to see what's up there or you don't. It's pretty tough to beat ten inches of aperture for a first telescope, he's 25 years old and has been warned about the size.

 

10” Dobs are very heavy. A 30 pound optical tube isn’t convenient, it’s large and unwieldy. What’s your home situation? Do you roll it out from the garage and observe from the driveway? are you up multiple flights of stairs?

 

I’d recommend an 8” Dob over a 10” for newbies. They’re much lighter and under typical city light pollution show about the same as a 10”... they’re also not divas about what eyepieces you use. 
 

You’re spending a pile of money, consider if you want a GoTo telescope. The fact is, it’s nice to have a scope that will track solar system objects through the night. It’s super convenient, but yes, usually more expensive. I love my Dob, but some nights I don’t want to be the nudging motor drive. A lot of Dob enthusiasts will sing it from the rooftops, then you realize they’ve got a trussed, 14” GoTo model and the last time they manually slewed their Dob was decades ago. Don’t necessarily trust the teacher with a motorcycle who tells you to ride a fixed gear bicycle, you don’t have to learn the skies much to also enjoy the luxury of a GoTo telescope  

He's spending $600.00 on the ten inch. What Go To  are you recommending in that price range? (I'm not disagreeing with your points on the 8 inch, but my first scope was a ten) 


  • Jokerb12 likes this

#47 georgec02

georgec02

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 67
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2015
  • Loc: San Francisco, CA

Posted 01 March 2021 - 12:35 AM

Welcome and hope you end up loving astronomy and observing.

While COVID has made it tough, and it sounds like you may have a decent deal that is hard to pass up, I’d still encourage you to try to take your time and see if you can do some observing with an actual scope before buying. Post here or in other forums to see if you can find a local astronomer or two that are willing to let you try see and feel different setups before buying. Observing can be done safely socially distanced.

Every situation is different, and like raising children, the telescope and approach that works for one person may not be the same as another. So, take all of our suggestions with a grain of salt, and think about them in light of your situation.

First of all - the best telescope is one that you’re going to use. You need to understand what you’re trading off: Cost vs Light Gathering vs Size vs Ease of Use. Unless you have unlimited budget you’re going to need to choose some combo.

As mentioned - how easy is it for you to get out your telescope to observe: are you going to watch from your backyard or do you want/need to drive? Do you have space to store your scope or does it need to be (dis)assembled every time. Do you need to haul it up and down stairs? Fit it in your car? I live in a city and have to haul my dob out a window to a roof or get it into a car down 3 flights of stairs to drive. It’s a bit of a pain. It’s partly why I finally bought a SCT (not exactly lighter, but easier to assemble and not as bulky).

A 10” dob is a great value as a light bucket. but it will take time to learn. The reality is that it’s also a beast if you have to carry it far. The base is heavy and bulky. The tube is big. If you live somewhere where you can just roll it into the back yard, that’s great. Note that some commenters have said it’s easy because they use a hand truck - is that what you envision as easy to use?

As for go-to. Purists will tel you that you should learn and be able to find anything in the night sky, but that takes time and practice. If you are able to do this regularly, then a manual scope is great. However, if you’re doing it infrequently, even if you get the basics down, a goto scope is sometimes nice to help find some objects that otherwise might be difficult to locate. Also, they track an object for you. At higher magnification, you’re going to be constantly chasing that star or planet. They don’t hold still for you, and the higher the magnification the faster they drift through your eyepiece.

Also if you get the dob, a Telrad is well worth the money, and along with that a set of guides called “Finder Charts of The Messier Objects” which overlay the object with the Telrad finder circles so you have a sense of scale.

Books are a must because they not only map out objects, they tell you how to star hop to find them. You won’t necessarily learn that with an app or want to be youtubing and ruining your night vision when your observing. There are great books out there. I loved Turn Left at Orion and Nightwatch to name 2.

Also, you’ll want to leave budget for eye pieces. I easily spent more on eye pieces than for my first telescope - and I’m very budget oriented (aka cheap).

Also, please keep in mind that planets, DSOs etc are not going to look like most pictures that you see here (huge planets, large colorful DSOs) There’s definitely a wow factor in seeing Saturn’s rings and Jupiter’s moons, or the Orion Nebula, but they’re going to be smaller and fainter than pics that astrophotographers are posting. Only the moon is going to look huge and well detailed. Many DSOs are going to be smudges of light.

Note that you mentioned that the person selling the dob is doing so because they couldn’t figure out how to use it. You might want to ask yourself whether you’re situation and determination is any different.

I’m not trying to discourage you, but there is a learning curve and it’s hard to know what that is if you’ve never had a chance to to actually look through a telescope first. My family was able to go to a few “star parties” and look through scopes, ask questions, see what something looked like in real life before making a purchase.

Again, take your time, see if you can find a local astronomer who would be willing to let you observe with them - they probably know others locally too, even if there isn’t a club.

And as an encouragement - I don’t get to observe anywhere near as often as I like, living in a light polluted, foggy city. However my family loves it. I have great memories of watching my kids hug the scope to move it because it was as big as they were (and finding objects through using the Telrad), finding things like the ring nebula for the first time, setting up while camping and people asking if they can take a peek (and then coming back the next night with a six pack asking if they could take another look at Saturn), and most recently an almost endless line of people taking a peek at the most recent planetary conjunction (masked and distant) when we setup at on the sidewalk by our city’s beach.

Hope you enjoy your journey.

Edited by georgec02, 01 March 2021 - 09:52 AM.

  • Tfer, radiofm74, Hexley and 1 other like this

#48 radiofm74

radiofm74

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 265
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2021
  • Loc: Milano (Italy)

Posted 01 March 2021 - 04:17 AM

We're smothering you in good advice as was to be expected lol.gif

 

But I've just posted this vid elsewhere and thought it would be perfect for you if you have 15' and a coffee handy:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=BQ-g2eWj0Fs



#49 JOEinCO

JOEinCO

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,198
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Colorado Front Range

Posted 01 March 2021 - 04:23 AM

My 10 XTI from my garage to the yard and setup takes 2 mins on a bad day. 1 Dolly rolling through yard (40 seconds) the other minute and a half to verify the collimation. These are not 20 inch truss tub dobs. Compare that to my etx 80 lugging the tripod then getting the actual telescope to lay on the tripod then aligning the go to .. um, takes less time for the dob and less hassle.

 

....I think ill go with the Dob 10"......so ill just go straight for the 10" Dob. im only 25, so the weight is no problem for me.

 

Just something to consider before you plunk down your money: It may only take 2 minutes to deploy a 10" Dob, and you may be strong-like-bull or only roll it out and use it in your driveway, but that brings up two things people aren't mentioning in their aperture-love responses.

 

1) Acclimation. I don't care how fast or strong you are, it is going to take 45 minutes or so for a 10" mirror to reach thermal equilibrium. Until then, views will be very soft.

 

2) If quick set up out your garage door is the plan because of the bulk of the 10" Dob, don't forget point #1 and don't forget the driveway itself. The temperature bugaboo is raising it's head again. A paved driveway in front of a paved street is quite possibly the worst place to set up. The day's heat rising off those surfaces probably doesn't stop wiggling your views until 12:00-1:00am on a hot summer night. 

 

So here's an idea: Consider buying a first scope that will be complimentary to a 10" Dob down the road. Use the compact, easy to use, fast-to-acclimate scope to learn the sky and teach yourself. Then down the road you'll have a pistol to go with your cannon. waytogo.gif 

 

What is that scope? Lot's of choices and probably a topic for you to attack in another thread, but think "decent mount" and "quick to acclimate" (always think "decent mount" on any telescope choice...that's why the Dobs are so great).


  • James_5474, radiofm74 and Hexley like this

#50 jjbag

jjbag

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 534
  • Joined: 28 Feb 2017
  • Loc: Mid Atlantic

Posted 01 March 2021 - 06:41 AM

1) Acclimation. I don't care how fast or strong you are, it is going to take 45 minutes or so for a 10" mirror to reach thermal equilibrium. Until then, views will be very soft.

 

Just need to correct this, if  your Dob is in the garage its already at cool down temp. I know I don't heat/air condition my garage so, rolling it from my garage to the yard and by the time i take the bungee cords off its set to go.


  • radiofm74 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Beginner, Celestron, Dob



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics