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Buying my beginner telescope! Need advise! >.<

Beginner Celestron Dob
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#51 JOEinCO

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 09:07 AM

Just need to correct this, if  your Dob is in the garage its already at cool down temp. I know I don't heat/air condition my garage so, rolling it from my garage to the yard and by the time i take the bungee cords off its set to go.

You are very fortunate that your garage is exactly at the outside temp year-round. bow.gif   Winter might be close, but most non-air conditioned garages get well above outside temps on hot summer days. Then that hot mirror goes out into a 60°-70° evening. 



#52 jjbag

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 09:50 AM

You are very fortunate that your garage is exactly at the outside temp year-round. bow.gif   Winter might be close, but most non-air conditioned garages get well above outside temps on hot summer days. Then that hot mirror goes out into a 60°-70° evening. 

If its 100 outside during the day in summer its 95 in my garage by the time dusk rolls around Its 88 outside and my garage is the same temperature as the outside,  you can reverse that in the winter where my garage is a few degrees warmer than the outdoors yet at dusk once the sun sets they are equal. So  for me no cooldown required its already there or if its off its only a degree or 2 and that won't take but a few minutes to catch up.


Edited by jjbag, 01 March 2021 - 09:51 AM.


#53 JOEinCO

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 10:16 AM

OK. There ya go. So it's true: You don't have to worry about "lugging" your heavy ETX80 tripod around (is that one of those 3" Meade Field Tripods?). grin.gif grin.gif 

 

Clear skies, my thermally-unchallenged friend!



#54 Hexley  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 10:17 AM

My first telescope was a ten inch dob. I use all that I have weather allowing. You either have the desire to see what's up there or you don't. It's pretty tough to beat ten inches of aperture for a first telescope, he's 25 years old and has been warned about the size.

 

He's spending $600.00 on the ten inch. What Go To  are you recommending in that price range? (I'm not disagreeing with your points on the 8 inch, but my first scope was a ten) 

For GoTos I'm recommending a Celestron NexStar 4/5/6SE, depending on what he can find that meets price expectations. Certainly a brand new 4 or 5SE meets the budget. My 6SE was $650 on the dot, but obviously that takes a bit of luck, it was an open Box deal from HighPoint (probably a return that the recipient never opened). It's a phenomenal, portable scope that tracks all night long.

 

I have a Dob too, it's an 8"... about 40 pounds, 20 in the tube, 20 in the base. I still wouldn't want to bring it down stairs, it lives in my garage. Honestly, I've looked through enough 10/12" Dobs to realize I'm not missing much (our club's main site is a Bortle 6 at the edge of a very large city that stares out into the darkness of the Everglades (assuming we're pointing west), but our remote areas in the swamp are Bortle 3. While the 12" shows a difference on DSO, I don't see the difference when comparing 8 to 10" Dobs.

 

I understand he's 25, I was too... I also moved 5 times in 5 years, 3x chasing promotions, once for marriage, then into our house. I happen to think if you're going to go big, you should go trussed 12" at least with push-to if not go-to... but I wouldn't recommend it for beginners.


Edited by Hexley, 01 March 2021 - 12:08 PM.

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#55 jjbag

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 10:45 AM

OK. There ya go. So it's true: You don't have to worry about "lugging" your heavy ETX80 tripod around (is that one of those 3" Meade Field Tripods?). grin.gif grin.gif 

 

Clear skies, my thermally-unchallenged friend!

Really no need to get snide here "my friend", I am just stating the facts as I see them where I live, if its different in your area where there is a huge temperature difference between an unheated/unairconditioned garage and outdoor temperature then your facts are different than mine so no need to resort to remarks like yours. 



#56 dmgriff

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 11:18 AM

Hi guys, i'm currently struggling in choosing between two telescope and im not sure which one to buy. the two telescope are:

1. Celestron starsense explorer lt 127az reflector (new)

2. BT252 10 inch Dobsonian telescope (used)
 

So which one should i buy?

 

Responses have eliminated the 127 bird jones, and a 10in or 8in f ~1200mm dob seem to be the consensus.

 

For the dob I recommend a DIGITAL INCLINOMETER (ANGLE FINDER) for altitude setting as almost a must have for ease of use. You may not need the degree circle for azimuth to start with. Refer to the manual push to degree circle pinned threads on CN.

 

https://www.amazon.c...sl_3za3qnaxn4_e

 

Just get the alt/az degrees from software on tablet or smart phone and set the altitude degrees on the inclinometer. Lock your altitude axis if possible. If you know where north is you can guesstimate your azimuth with a sweep in the finder and with a low power ep to get you in the ball park. 

 

A moderately priced rotating ball compass (such as for car or boat) may be a nice addition on the base sidewall or the tube if it is not steel.

 

Good viewing,

 

Dave


Edited by dmgriff, 01 March 2021 - 11:21 AM.

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#57 DouglasPaul

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 11:21 AM

For GoTos I'm recommending a Celestron NexStar 4/5/6SE, depending on what he can find that meets price expectations. Certainly a brand new 4 or 5SE meets the budget. My 6SE was $650 on the dot, but obviously that takes a bit of luck, it was an open Box deal from HighPoint (probably a return that the recipient never opened). It's a phenomenal, portable scope that tracks all night long.

 

I have a Dob too, it's an 8"... about 40 pounds, 20 in the tube, 20 in the base. I still wouldn't want to bring it down stairs, it lives in my garage. Honestly, I've looked through enough 10/12" Does to realize I'm not missing much (our club's main site is a Bortle 6 at the edge of a very large city that stares out into the darkness of the Everglades (assuming we're pointing west), but our remote areas in the swamp are Bortle 3. While the 12" shows a difference on DSO, I don't see the difference when comparing 8 to 10" Dobs.

 

I understand he's 25, I was too... I also moved 5 times in 5 years, 3x chasing promotions, once for marriage, then into our house. I happen to think if you're going to go big, you should go trussed 12" at least with push-to if not go-to... but I wouldn't recommend it for beginners.

I didn't realize the SE's were that cheap. Hmm, Amazon shows the 4 at $579.00, the 5 at $1,124.00 with a used option at $721. which might be a good option and the 6 interestingly a bit cheaper than the 5 at $1,128.99.

 

I agree the SE's would be a good option, although I think it's a stretch to put the 4 up against a 10.


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#58 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 12:12 PM

I keep a 6" Orion SkyQuest XT6 Dob in my garage for casual observing from my driveway.  I rarely have problems with thermal currents.  My 10" Sky-Watcher Collapsible Dob is stored in the garage too but I don't use it very often from my home. 


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#59 Hexley  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 12:21 PM

Yeah, the retail price on the xSE line is $499/699/799 for the 4"/5"/6" respectively. Agreed that the 4" is a stretch to compare to the 10" Dob, but the 6" is in the ballpark. The 8" SE is a bit nuts at $1199... at that price I'd go with a 8 or 9.25" Evolution for the nicer, stronger mount and built-in battery/wifi... but the cheaper SE line is really just fine for the humid east coast, Bortle 5-8 backyard viewing (maybe if I ever moved to 300 clear nights, dry Arizona in a Bortle 1-4 I'd get a huge SCT).


Edited by Hexley, 01 March 2021 - 04:26 PM.


#60 Jokerb12

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 05:57 PM

Instead of 600 for a heavyer dob, you can get a 8 inch AD8 for around 500 and that will give you everything you need to start, you can use the extra 100 for a red dot finder and other accesories. Dobsonians are really not that hard to use, the ad8 comes with a a laser collimator and once aligned can be used to easily collimate the dobsonian, 

hahaha. 8inch telescope cost 650-700 in australia. and some second hand 8 inch also cost around 600. so it gonna be 600 for either a dob 10" or a 8"



#61 Spile

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 04:25 PM

A 8” Dobsonian was my choice as it hit the sweet of aperture, weight, size and price for me. 
I did get “upgrades” once I had familiarised myself with it but I would always recommended you find out for yourself.

Well apart from Turn Left at Orion of course which is mandatory.



#62 Jokerb12

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Posted 12 March 2021 - 11:24 PM

ok. i got my 10' dob now. and i brought a 30mm 2" 82 degree ES eyepiece from that person as well. and that person suggested me to buy another 8.8 82 degree as well. Has anyone used 30mm and 8.8mm 82degree ES eyepieces on the 10 inch dob yet? any reviews? what's the 8.8 used for? should i buy the 8.8 as well?? its been cloudy in sydney for a week now, so i dont have any chance in using it yet. 


Edited by Jokerb12, 12 March 2021 - 11:26 PM.


#63 AngryGinger81

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Posted 12 March 2021 - 11:56 PM

The 30mm will be for lower magnification/wider field of view. It's great for looking at "larger" DSOs like open clusters and nebula. It's also good for searching for smaller objects and then switching to a higher power (lower focal length eyepiece, like the 8.8). The 8.8mm will be good for close-ups of the moon, planets, double stars, and "smaller" DSOs. When I say "larger" and "smaller" I mean their apparent size from earth, not their actual size, of course. The ES 82 degree eyepieces are, by pretty much all accounts, excellent eyepieces. If the price works for you, I say go for both as you won't do much better without spending quite a bit. Those two will give you plenty of viewing ability. Down the road, you may want something in between, like a 17-20mm, and possibly something even shorter than the 8.8 if you want strong magnification for planets and tiny objects. Something like a 4mm would be good, but I'd suggest gaining some experience before buying one. There are many important caveats to good viewing at high magnification. Another route would be stick with the 30mm and 8.8, and then add a good barlow or powermate. 

 

I just started observing recently myself (a few months ago), and I've learned so much from this site. Youtube is your friend too, but I think I learned the most from Turn Left at Orion. I can't recommend it enough. You have a very nice kit for getting started. Take some time and learn the ropes. You will inevitably hit some snags, and run into frustration, but the people here will help you through it. It's a fantastic community. Good observing is only partially about equipment. A large portion is skill and patience for the right conditions. Practice, practice, practice.

 

Good luck, and clear skies!


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#64 robodan

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Posted 13 March 2021 - 12:05 AM

Have seen some get a 10" dob on advise its a great scope for a beginner only to find they give up and collects dust. A 10" dob is heavy and bulky for a beginner.

I dont recommend any 10" for a beginner.

Edited by robodan, 13 March 2021 - 12:06 AM.


#65 AngryGinger81

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Posted 13 March 2021 - 08:07 AM

To be fair, beggars can't be choosers right now. If scopes were in stock and he had many choices, then something more portable might be better. He's not going in blind to it, at least. On the plus side, the views will set the hook deep. LOL!



#66 Jokerb12

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Posted 13 March 2021 - 06:37 PM

so... i had a try yesterday. i realised my  9X50 RIGHT ANGLE CORRECT IMAGE FINDER SCOPE is really blurry when viewing stars. it felt like it had some focus issue. but i dont know how to change the focus of that finder scope. i my dob out for at least 45mins before viewing. so i made sure its not becuz of the temperature difference that caused the blurry. can anyone help?



#67 Don H

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Posted 13 March 2021 - 07:45 PM

so... i had a try yesterday. i realised my  9X50 RIGHT ANGLE CORRECT IMAGE FINDER SCOPE is really blurry when viewing stars. it felt like it had some focus issue. but i dont know how to change the focus of that finder scope. i my dob out for at least 45mins before viewing. so i made sure its not becuz of the temperature difference that caused the blurry. can anyone help?

From the manual:

 

Focusing the FinderScope
If, when looking through the finderscope, the images
appear somewhat out of focus, you will need to
refocus the finderscope for your eyes. Loosen the
lock ring located behind the objective lens cell on the
body of the finderscope Back the lock ring off by a
few turns, for now. Refocus the finderscope on a
distant object by threading the objective lens cell in
or out on the finderscope body. Precise focusing will
be achieved by focusing the finderscope on a bright
star. Once the image appears sharp, retighten the
lock ring behind the objective lens cell. The finder
scope’s focus should not need to be adjusted again.
 

 

https://y7i4h2m2.sta...bs-Latest-1.pdf

 

 

By the way, congratulations on your new scope!


Edited by Don H, 13 March 2021 - 07:48 PM.

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#68 Jokerb12

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Posted 13 March 2021 - 07:51 PM

From the manual:

<...snip...>

thank you so much!



#69 Jokerb12

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 09:53 PM

OK... i've got the 10 inch dob for a while now. but its been raining for a really long time in australia. so yesterday was the first clear night i had. so i took the chance and used the dob.  the photos were taken with my phone. i dont have a phone adapter, so its a bit blury.  let me know if theres any improvements i could do. i used a 30mm and 10mm with 2X barlow. ES 82 degree EP for these two. 

i just wanna thank everyone for suggesting this telescope. loved it. it is a bit heavy to carry for a distant. but i got a trolley, so its all good


IMG 20210325 225405 459
IMG 20210325 222054  01

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#70 michael_qrt

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Posted 25 March 2021 - 11:09 PM

 

OK... i've got the 10 inch dob for a while now. but its been raining for a really long time in australia. so yesterday was the first clear night i had. so i took the chance and used the dob.  the photos were taken with my phone. i dont have a phone adapter, so its a bit blury.  let me know if theres any improvements i could do. i used a 30mm and 10mm with 2X barlow. ES 82 degree EP for these two. 

i just wanna thank everyone for suggesting this telescope. loved it. it is a bit heavy to carry for a distant. but i got a trolley, so its all good

 

 

Congrats on the scope! I'm just up a bit north of Sydney and yeah, we've had very few clear nights (or even gaps in the cloud) for the past few months but hang in there, it's not always like this.

 

I also started with a 10" dob and it worked for me, if it suits an individual's situation then it's a powerful instrument and can be very rewarding to use.

 

For eyepieces you've obviously got the low power end covered with the 30mm ES82 and I guess you've got a couple of the stock Plossls that came with the scope and a 2x Barlow? Those eps are fine to use for now but if you would like to upgrade I wouldn't worry about fitting new ep focal lengths in between the stock ones, rather think of what your goal set would be and work towards that even if it means replacing the stock ones with the same or similar focal length. For me a good basic set would be the low power ep you have, something in the 13-17mm range, something in the 8-10mm range and a barlow to get to higher powers, I'd be looking at eps with a 60+ degree AFOV. There's a multitude of options for an ep set depending on how much you're willing to spend and how close you space the ep focal lengths. It wouldn't be a bad plan to use what you have for a while to get a better idea of what you want.

 

We do get good atmospheric seeing conditions around here from time to time so having something to get to the 250-300x magnification range is worthwhile for planets and small DSOs (had quite a few sessions last year where I could use magnifications in the range 250-340x, although when the seeing is poor the images will be blurry at 150x).

 

Have you tried viewing any DSOs yet?


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#71 ChuppsterXLM

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Posted 27 March 2021 - 10:59 AM

You could also start with a good pair of 7x50 Binos ...learn your constellations first. You can get lost in the Milky Way very fast!  grin.gif  Then you can pilot a nice 8" dob to all the wonderful faint fuzzies out there!. Cheers! waytogo.gif


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#72 Jokerb12

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Posted 29 March 2021 - 06:00 PM

Congrats on the scope!
<…snip…>

hahaha. i tried to find orion nebula. but no luck becuz my finder scope is not working very well. so i gonna buy another telrad first and then try again. im up north as well. im at hornsby. im thinking of joining the northern sydney astronomical society. i really need someone to help me lol


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#73 Deep13

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Posted 03 April 2021 - 12:19 AM

The perfect beginner telescope is ... (class?) ... an 8" f/6 Dob. Of the two you mentioned, the 10" is a very capable instrument, especially if you can transport it to dark skies, while the other one is junk. My only reservation on the 10" is that they are pretty big and heavier than the 8", and, therefore, a bit more difficult to transport.




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