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I'm not sure where to ask this... Having issues with DSI

Beginner Celestron DSLR
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#1 DownInAHole

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 04:04 AM

Hi,

I'm a very very new 14yo 'astrophotographer' and I'm having some issues with the Orion Nebula and I hope this forum could help,

I'm working with:

•Celestron 114GT

•Canon 40D

(No tracker)

 

I cant find the nebula in my camera; When I point my scope at Orion's sword, I see pairs of stars but I don't know which is the nebula. I can find it using eyepieces without the camera but it seems that the camera images are too dark to see anything that I can see with my eye.

What would be helpful is if somebody could post an image of what a short (1 second) exposure of the nebula looks like.

Also, when I take the photos of what I think is the nebula, I can only see faint dots and a tonne of noise. I can't see the glow of the nebula through the camera like I can with my eye.

 

I don't have any massive expectations, I just want to learn how to get better :)

Thank you!

 

Below is an image of what I can see through my camera (hopefully pointed at the nebula) on a  1 second exposure with 1600 ISO

Attached Thumbnails

  • _MG_1618.jpg


#2 DownInAHole

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 04:06 AM

It's also worth mentioning that I'm in a bortle 5 zone and it was a full moon when I took that last night



#3 maxsid

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 04:13 AM

You were probably in the right place.

1 sec is just too short. Try 10 sec. 100 sec. Higher ISO. Just to see what comes out.

 

Good luck!


Edited by maxsid, 27 February 2021 - 04:16 AM.

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#4 sg6

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 04:32 AM

You will need a longer exposure to make an impact on the sensor, try 10 seconds.

Set the ISO up towards 1600 FOR just finding the thing. The idea is to wind it up to locate then put M42 in the middle, then reduce the ISO back to say 800.

 

For DSO you will need a few images, the idea is to stack one on the other and so build up the image.

 

Now one option for you as you say "No tracker" is to get a red dot finder and out it on a shoe for the DSLR. Align the finder and DSLR fairly accurately, then center M42 with the finder, take a 10 second exposure. Check centering and take another. Should get a few between recentering.

 

Set DSLR to manual and a 10 second exposure and either have a timer delay of 3 to 5 seconds or use a small cable release. Disable any noise reduction.

 

Takes longer as most is manual, can be more fun. You have stuff to do.


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#5 Mike in Rancho

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 04:50 AM

You clipped your blacks!  (just kidding.  you'll get that joke eventually lol)

 

Well, I'm guessing there's a ton to learn here.  But, I think it's still good to experiment and at least get a few images under your belt.  Can you achieve star focus using the live screen?  If not, how are you with the moon?  Can you get focus through your scope and take a 1 second picture of that?  If you can, and it looks good, lock down that focus and then swing over to M42.

 

Then, it's most likely just a matter of getting the right balance of ISO and exposure time.  Keep trying, and eventually you should at least get some star trails and blurred nebulosity.  If you haven't already, download your camera manual and learn how to use all the manual settings.  Experiment just taking some nighttime landscape shots with a lens.

 

Now, I presume no focal reducer?  1000mm is going to be pushing the limit, actually probably well beyond it, even with only a 1 second exposure.  You said no tracking mount, but the reality is that's somewhat indispensable here.  To get away with static 1 second shots, and then stack them, you're probably looking at a max of about 300mm.  In fact, if you have any camera lenses (even zooms) and a camera tripod, that can help you learn some basics a little easier - though you still want a tracker of course to make any real progression.

 

Good luck and have fun!


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