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Spring is coming, so what is the best objects to view?

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#1 Jmail4

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 04:33 PM

So I own a nice, quality 130mm telescope. Now that. I have more experience using my telescope and the viewing opportunities are changing,  what are the best objects to view with my telescope right now other than of course the orion nebula. I also plan on getting an UHC Filter soon.

And why was I not able to see the Rosette nebula (Im pretty confident that I was looking in the right spot. I used like 26x power. I maybe saw a little spot of gas with averted vision but there was no ringed smudge or something like that. Is it really dim?)

 

Thanks



#2 CounterWeight

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 04:37 PM

Yes it is dim, or better put  'low contrast'.

 

I recommend downloading the FREE "Stellarium" program, it runs on near anything.  Set it up for location and get familiar with the interface, it will be a fountain of information for observing from your location.  Stellarium LINK


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#3 TikiTom

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 04:50 PM

check out this link. Gives nightly, monthly targets and more,

also known for "astronomy planning made easy":

https://telescopius.com


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#4 PirateMike

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 04:56 PM

Nice scope I'm sure, but how dark are your skies?

 

I think the "rule" is that if you want to have a good view of many things then you need a 12" reflector or bigger, and even then many objects will be little more than small gray fuzzies.

 

Many people who are totally dedicated to viewing buy "big cannons".

 

But don't fret, the 130mm is better than nothing, you just possibly need to adjust your expectations... and get out there and practice, practice, practice. waytogo.gif

 

 

And remember... that no matter what you do... make sure that you are having fun while doing it.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

 

.


Edited by PirateMike, 28 February 2021 - 05:07 PM.

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#5 Bean614

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 04:57 PM

Please be very aware that Nebulae, Galaxies, etc. (Faint Fuzzies) can only be seen best visually under dark skies, WITHOUT any Moonlight!


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#6 Jethro7

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 04:59 PM

Hello Jmail4,

Take a look see through Dave Mitsky's calendar list " Celestial Events"  they can be found at the top of the main topics page. Lots of good stuff.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 01 March 2021 - 02:39 PM.

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#7 Jmail4

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 05:07 PM

Nice scope I'm sure, but how dark are your skies?

<...snip...>

I currently usually view in bortle 3-4 skies.

Thanks


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#8 PirateMike

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 05:09 PM

I currently usually view in bortle 3-4 skies.

Thanks

That's pretty good. The darker the better. 

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

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#9 SirLoyne

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 05:10 PM

Leo is coming up in the East. Lots of galaxies to be found.


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#10 Tony Flanders

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 05:22 PM

So I own a nice, quality 130mm telescope. Now that. I have more experience using my telescope and the viewing opportunities are changing,  what are the best objects to view with my telescope right now other than of course the orion nebula. I also plan on getting an UHC Filter soon.

And why was I not able to see the Rosette nebula (Im pretty confident that I was looking in the right spot. I used like 26x power. I maybe saw a little spot of gas with averted vision but there was no ringed smudge or something like that. Is it really dim?)

 

Thanks

First let's talk about the Rosette Nebula. This nebula hangs on an extremely bright star cluster dominated by six or eight 8th-magnitude stars arranged roughly into two parallel north-south lines. It's often described as looking like a water tower or some such. Even if you can't spot the nebulosity, the cluster should be very obvious.

 

Seeing the nebulosity requires dark skies and/or a nebula filter and/or lots of skill seeing nebulae. It's actually quite bright as nebulae go, but not in the same class as the Orion Nebula. Give it another whirl once you have the UHC filter.

 

When in doubt, observe Messier objects. Early spring is a great time for M41 (I hope you've checked that out already!), M50 (a bit lackluster to my taste), the splendid M67-M47 pair, and M48. Also, of course, the ultrabright Beehive Cluster (M44) and its lovely companion M67 in Cancer's southeastern corner.

 

There are also some fine double stars, most notably colorful HJ 3945 in CMa and Beta Mon, arguably the sky's loveliest triple. Use at least 100X to see Beta Mon's 3rd component.

 

After that comes galaxy season, which may be challenging if you're working in typical suburban skies. In general, the Messier galaxies are the easiest ones to see, with a few exceptions. NGC 2903 in Leo's head is a Messier-class galaxy that Messier missed.

 

And after that comes globular cluster season, which is likely to be a bit easier from a suburban site.


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#11 Jmail4

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 05:36 PM

First let's talk about the Rosette Nebula. This nebula hangs on an extremely bright star cluster dominated by six or eight 8th-magnitude stars arranged roughly into two parallel north-south lines. It's often described as looking like a water tower or some such. Even if you can't spot the nebulosity, the cluster should be very obvious.

 

Seeing the nebulosity requires dark skies and/or a nebula filter and/or lots of skill seeing nebulae. It's actually quite bright as nebulae go, but not in the same class as the Orion Nebula. Give it another whirl once you have the UHC filter.

 

When in doubt, observe Messier objects. Early spring is a great time for M41 (I hope you've checked that out already!), M50 (a bit lackluster to my taste), the splendid M67-M47 pair, and M48. Also, of course, the ultrabright Beehive Cluster (M44) and its lovely companion M67 in Cancer's southeastern corner.

 

There are also some fine double stars, most notably colorful HJ 3945 in CMa and Beta Mon, arguably the sky's loveliest triple. Use at least 100X to see Beta Mon's 3rd component.

 

After that comes galaxy season, which may be challenging if you're working in typical suburban skies. In general, the Messier galaxies are the easiest ones to see, with a few exceptions. NGC 2903 in Leo's head is a Messier-class galaxy that Messier missed.

 

And after that comes globular cluster season, which is likely to be a bit easier from a suburban site.

I realized that galaxies can be tough in high bottle skies. Thankfully live in middle bortle 4 and have a darker spot with only one streetlight across a building that I use as a light pollution cover from it in transition 3-4 skies.

Thanks for the info as well as everyone else



#12 TOMDEY

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 05:41 PM

This becomes a notable targert.    Tom

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#13 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 07:07 PM

Here are some of the DSO lists from my Celestial Calendar.

Top ten deep-sky objects for February: M35, M41, M46, M47, M50, M93, NGC 2261, NGC 2362, NGC 2392, NGC 2403

The objects listed above are located between 6:00 and 8:00 hours of right ascension.
 

Top ten deep-sky objects for March: M44, M48, M67, M81, M82, NGC 2654, NGC 2683, NGC 2835, NGC 2841, NGC 2903

The objects listed above are located between 8:00 and 10:00 hours of right ascension.
 

Top ten deep-sky objects for April: M65, M66, M95, M96, M97, M105, M108, NGC 3115, NGC 3242, NGC 3628

The objects listed above are located between 10:00 and 12:00 hours of right ascension.
 

Top ten deep-sky objects for May: M3, M51, M63, M64, M83, M87, M104, M106, NGC 4449, NGC 4565

The objects listed above are located between 12:00 and 14:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for June: M5, M101, M102, NGC 5566, NGC 5585, NGC 5689, NGC 5746, NGC 5813, NGC 5838, NGC 5907

The objects listed above are located between 14:00 and 16:00 hours of right ascension.

Some of the objects are more difficult than others.


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#14 LDW47

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 07:10 PM

Up here in northern Canada spring weather won’t really be here for a couple more months, at that time M13 and M92 in / near Hercules will be at a great position relatively early ie 10 - 11 pm in the evening for viewing. Also all there is to to been seen in / around the Big Dipper will be hanging over head close to zenith. Have a look !


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#15 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 07:18 PM

These two lists are good ones for going beyond the Messier Catalog.  The second one is divided into seasons.

http://messier.seds....r/sac110bn.html (the SAC's best objects in the NGC list)

 

http://messier.seds....r/rasc-ngc.html (the RASC's finest NGC objects list)


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#16 Sheol

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 07:22 PM

                    Dave missed M.53, other than that, a pretty comprehensive list for Spring show pieces. waytogo.gif

 

                  Clear Skies,

                         Matt.



#17 chrysalis

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 07:30 PM

This one is good to generate lists of selected objects in chosen constellations. It is especially useful because it provides data on surface brightness, not just an integrated magnitude number (so this is applicable to your Rosette Nebula issue as well as e.g. Helix Nebula (NGC7293) and many others, as well as many galaxies):

 

http://www.virtualcolony.com/sac/

 

This one is good if you just would like to generate a list of objects visible from your location in a certain time range on a selected date:

 

https://tonightssky.com/MainPage.php


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#18 rhetfield

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 08:05 PM

First let's talk about the Rosette Nebula. This nebula hangs on an extremely bright star cluster dominated by six or eight 8th-magnitude stars arranged roughly into two parallel north-south lines. It's often described as looking like a water tower or some such. Even if you can't spot the nebulosity, the cluster should be very obvious.

 

 

I will second that.  Make sure you are looking at the star cluster first.  The cluster is fairly obvious in my 130mm scope in bortle 7 skies - even though the nebula itself is invisible.  I envy you.  I have yet to make it out to dark skies in the winter and have not yet seen any more of Orion nebula than the bright center.



#19 kksmith

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 08:26 PM

Nice scope I'm sure, but how dark are your skies?

 

I think the "rule" is that if you want to have a good view of many things then you need a 12" reflector or bigger, and even then many objects will be little more than small gray fuzzies.

 

Many people who are totally dedicated to viewing buy "big cannons".

 

But don't fret, the 130mm is better than nothing, you just possibly need to adjust your expectations... and get out there and practice, practice, practice. waytogo.gif

 

 

And remember... that no matter what you do... make sure that you are having fun while doing it.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

 

.

 You need 12" over 5" for visual? This is exactly the type of stuff that turns people away because it makes assumptions that if you want to see anything meaningful - you need a light bucket. 


Edited by kksmith, 28 February 2021 - 08:29 PM.

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#20 CarolinaBanker

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 08:37 PM

This has a list of celestial events, objects and a map of the seasonal sky. http://skymaps.com/d...downloads.html 



#21 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 09:03 PM

                    Dave missed M.53, other than that, a pretty comprehensive list for Spring show pieces. waytogo.gif

 

                  Clear Skies,

                         Matt.

I tried to give the monthly lists some balance in terms of object type so some DSOs had to be omitted.  There's a long list of binary stars and DSOs included in my calendar each month as well.



#22 Jmail4

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 09:41 PM

Thanks for the informative lists Dave.

Also I noticed you are located in "PA, USA, 'Planet Earth'." Planning on moving to Mars on a rocket in a couple years huh?

>

I tried to give the monthly lists some balance in terms of object type so some DSOs had to be omitted.  There's a long list of binary stars and DSOs included in my calendar each month



#23 rowdy388

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 09:45 PM

Galaxies are always a spring highlight, but I also enjoy the return of bright globular clusters that are missing during the winter. At least we get a taste of what's  to come.



#24 PirateMike

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 10:54 PM

 You need 12" over 5" for visual? This is exactly the type of stuff that turns people away because it makes assumptions that if you want to see anything meaningful - you need a light bucket. 

My bad. From now on I'll tell everyone that a 5" scope is wonderful for viewing nebula, but a 12" would be better.

 

I would contend that what turns people away are those that say that they spent their hard earned resources and still feel that they can't see anything meaningful with their new 5" scope.

 

Anyways the OP does not seem over joyed that he couldn't see the Rosette with his 5" scope. Maybe he assumed (for some reason) that he could expect to see something like this...

https://www.astrobin.../full/384810/0/

 

 

Miguel   8-|

 

 

.


Edited by PirateMike, 28 February 2021 - 11:55 PM.


#25 JOEinCO

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Posted 01 March 2021 - 04:30 AM

If you are hunting dim targets like the Rosette, be sure to hunt when the huge Moon is out of the sky. Nobody is Bortle 3 when the Moon is full. grin.gif 


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