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My 4” Refractor Couldn't Resolve Rigel B

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#1 JimOfOakCreek

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 08:15 AM

I tried to split Rigel with my 4” APO last night unsuccessfully. I got the impression that Rigel B was there, lost in the glare of Rigel A. Has anyone successfully split Rigel with a 4” refractor? 


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#2 james7ca

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 08:24 AM

I've imaged Rigel B with an AT72ED refractor, so I'm sure it would be possible to see with a 4" APO.


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#3 Stellar1

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 08:47 AM

It took me 3 months of trying to split a difficult double (Zeta Her) you may not split it one night then the next you will. It comes down to seeing conditions, be patient, if you cant split it tonight then try again some other time. I have read of people splitting it with an 80mm so your 4" shouldn't be an issue, just not on the night of your choosing.


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#4 cookjaiii

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 08:49 AM

Yes, but it requires steady seeing and a temperature-acclimated telescope.


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#5 John Fitzgerald

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 08:57 AM

Sometimes the seeing is so poor that the Rigel companion cannot be resolved in any amateur telescope.


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#6 EricCCD

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 09:47 AM

I was at a park stargaze with our local club years ago and split Rigel with a 76mm refractor. When I proclaimed that to one of the veterans, I got a scoff and a “Rigel is easy!” 
 

That’s been ringing in my head ever since and has become a benchmark for me. This thread is some assurance that sometimes it’s not that easy..... and that what I saw that night was still noteworthy smile.gif


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#7 DAVIDG

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 10:01 AM

 I split  it two nights  ago with my vintage 4.25" f/10 Edmund reflector using 10mm eyepiece that gave 108x

 

                      - Dave 


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#8 cuzimthedad

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 12:19 PM

Moving to Double Star Observing


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#9 aa6ww

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 12:25 PM

Its always fun to split Rigel with small refractors. I've seen it in my 80mm F/15 but never tried it in my smaller FC-60. Steady skies seems to be more a key factor then darkness. Don't forget to check out the Clown Hat since you're at Orion and the Klingon Battle Ship NGC 1662 also.

 

 

My topic on the Clown Hat Asterism:

 

https://www.cloudyni...erism-new-find/

 

...Ralph


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#10 Bill Barlow

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 12:27 PM

You should be able to see Rigel’s companion star the vast majority of the time with a 4” refractor.  I see it pretty much every time with the 3” Takahashi.  Try to see it again another night, it is in the 7 o’clock position relative to Rigel.  
 

Bill


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#11 Rutilus

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 12:37 PM

I tried to split Rigel with my 4” APO last night unsuccessfully. I got the impression that Rigel B was there, lost in the glare of Rigel A. Has anyone successfully split Rigel with a 4” refractor? 

It will be poor seeing conditions affecting the view of Rigel and its companion star. When I had my top notch Takahashi

4 inch refractor there were nights when I could not see the companion. Then on better nights it would be so obvious in the

eyepiece.

The companion star can be seen in a refractor of 50mm aperture, I've seen it on many occasions when using a 50mm aperture mask

on my refractor scopes. 

 

p.s. Here is a photo I took the other night of Rigel and its companion.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Rigel-comp-cn.jpg

Edited by Rutilus, 02 March 2021 - 12:46 PM.

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#12 Codbear

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 02:39 PM

 I split  it two nights  ago with my vintage 4.25" f/10 Edmund reflector using 10mm eyepiece that gave 108x

 

                      - Dave 

My gosh...waves of nastalgia David. After a long forgotten 40mm refractor that was my first telescope, the Edmund 4 1/4" was my first really capable scope. With a glow-in-the-dark pinwheel star chart, those flimsy rubber setting circles, and a lot of mowing, I was able to find 100 0f the (then) 109 Messiers, leaving the remaining 9 to my homebuilt 10" dob I built in none other than a John Dobson class in the mid '70s as a teenager.

 

In spite of the smudgy Messier views, the double star views were quite good, though I never tried Rigel B with it.


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#13 DAVIDG

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 02:51 PM

My gosh...waves of nastalgia David. After a long forgotten 40mm refractor that was my first telescope, the Edmund 4 1/4" was my first really capable scope. With a glow-in-the-dark pinwheel star chart, those flimsy rubber setting circles, and a lot of mowing, I was able to find 100 0f the (then) 109 Messiers, leaving the remaining 9 to my homebuilt 10" dob I built in none other than a John Dobson class in the mid '70s as a teenager.

 

In spite of the smudgy Messier views, the double star views were quite good, though I never tried Rigel B with it.

 A 4.25" f/10 Newtonian with  spherical mirror that is actually a sphere   which the Edmund was advertised to have and a truly optical flat diagonal at best focus is a  true 1/8 wave system. I had to replace the secondary in mine since wasn't  flat and last fall touched up the figure on the primary from  mostly a sphere but it had  a zone in the middle that wasn't fully covered by the diagonal,  to one of a nice parabola. So with the cleaned up optics and the fact that it is perfectly achromatic it makes for a very nice double star scope and nice scope in general. 

 

             - Dave 


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#14 Bonco2

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 05:24 PM

Over the years I' owned different 60mm achromatic telescopes. Each one could easily resolve and clearly show the Rigel double. It's a beautiful pair but not difficult in a 60mm.  The first time I viewed it with a 60mm,  it was a guide scope on my 10 inch Newtonian. I seldom viewed thru it but but one night I focused on Rigel with a 9mm eyepiece and there she was clear as a picture. Since then I've viewed it many times in various 60mm  scopes.

Three things could prevent a view with larger scopes:  1) Seeing  2)  Poor optics or optics not collimated  or installed properly  3) The observers eyes and/or experience viewing a bright/dim double.

Bill


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#15 Voyager 3

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 08:30 PM

Even you don't require high-very high mags as Sirius requires for splitting Rigel . Because even though the seperation of both of em are same , the ∆mag is very big for Sirius , so you need to get the white dwarf far away from the glow of bright Sirius A .

So it's surely the seeing and not your scope .


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#16 Allan Wade

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 08:54 PM

Rigel B is an easy double and you will have no trouble catching it in your 4” once you have a good night of seeing. The key is, as Stellar1 described, is to observe often to give you the best chance of striking a night with good seeing. I get pretty good seeing and found Rigel B easy in my TV76. I could see Sirius B in that scope as well, as long as the seeing was good. I never saw the Pup in my TV85 though, but that scope had terrible optics. So seeing is the most important, and half decent optics helps too.


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#17 gfeulner

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Posted 02 March 2021 - 10:11 PM

I find it an easy split in my 80mm Fluorite.

Gerry


Edited by gfeulner, 03 March 2021 - 10:59 AM.

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#18 Astrojensen

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Posted 03 March 2021 - 02:03 AM

I have observed it numerous times in my 50/870mm Zeiss and once in a Vixen 80/1200mm achromat stopped down to 42mm. 

 

But the seeing must be good. This, and observer experience, is more important than aperture.  

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


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#19 MP173

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Posted 03 March 2021 - 09:12 AM

Had no problem on March 1st with AT102ED refractor.  Seeing wasnt the best and the difraction rings of Rigel flared out to engulf the companion at times, but it was there.

 

Plan on going back tonight.

 

Ed


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