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Time for Spring pollen problems

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#1 grif 678

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 05:50 PM

After all the rain, clouds, bad weather which has troubled many of us for a long time, now we have to protect our lenses on our scopes from the pollen. I do not know about other states, but here in NC the tree pollen is terrible for about 3 weeks, covering up stuff one hour after it has been cleaned.

So for you first time scope owners, I have seen pictures of what pollen will do if it gets on your lenses, especially if it gets damp also, and is not removed properly. I usually do not even attempt to take my scope out during this period, unless it is my small hand held spotter or a quick binocular look. When the pollen gets bad indeed, you may be able to use your scope right after a good rain has washed out the air, but not for long, because it will start right back up.

Here in NC, the pine pollen will get so bad, you can see the yellow dust floating in the air, like a yellow fog, and your sinuses will let you know about it also.


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#2 scotsman328i

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 06:51 PM

After all the rain, clouds, bad weather which has troubled many of us for a long time, now we have to protect our lenses on our scopes from the pollen. I do not know about other states, but here in NC the tree pollen is terrible for about 3 weeks, covering up stuff one hour after it has been cleaned.

So for you first time scope owners, I have seen pictures of what pollen will do if it gets on your lenses, especially if it gets damp also, and is not removed properly. I usually do not even attempt to take my scope out during this period, unless it is my small hand held spotter or a quick binocular look. When the pollen gets bad indeed, you may be able to use your scope right after a good rain has washed out the air, but not for long, because it will start right back up.

Here in NC, the pine pollen will get so bad, you can see the yellow dust floating in the air, like a yellow fog, and your sinuses will let you know about it also.

Billy, I’m in Charleston. It’s that time of the year to drive a green-yellow Chevy truck for 6-8 weeks until I can get my black truck back!



#3 UT_JimW

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 07:19 PM

I had a used Celestron 127 Mak OTA a few years ago that I was testing out right after I got it.  I took it off the manual alt-az mount and twisted to take it inside WITHOUT putting the cap on first and bumped the OTA edge next to the corrector lens right into an ornamental pine in our yard and covered the glass with pollen.

 

I was sick to my stomach.  I tried blowing the pollen off but it seemed electrostatically bound to the lens.  In frustration I just capped the scope and set it aside for what turned out to be several months.  Finally got up the nerve to take off the lens cover and attempt a cleaning, I discovered the pollen was now only loosely adhered to the lens.  I was able to get all the pollen off with a photography blower bulb and fine camel hair lens cleaning brush with no damage to the corrector.

 

But, I vowed never to do that again.


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#4 Jeff B1

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 07:26 PM

Around January and February the Florida Pine trees shed a yellow powder before the cones start falling off and it coats everything, including my nose.  Sneezing every morning and night.  Everything turns yellow and if it rains the yellow stuff puddles up.  Yuk. 


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#5 alphatripleplus

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 09:27 AM

Yeah, we have a season of a few weeks here where the pollen is noticeable too. I have used my scopes during that time, but lightly.


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#6 scotsman328i

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 10:25 AM

Yep, I was trying to get out last night to do a little review on the Nikon 7mm NAV SW. Skies were crystal clear too, but my allergies were on fire last night. Itchy eyes, scratchy throat and completely clogged with pollen. It’s these little warm spikes we’ve been getting that is triggering pollen big time here in Charleston. Hopefully I’ll get out for a bit this weekend. Report says it’s looking clear Sunday and Monday night.


Edited by scotsman328i, 05 March 2021 - 10:26 AM.


#7 jjbag

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 11:02 AM

In VA and I feel your pain, we get it at the end of march early april though mid may..  I only take my dob out if its a still night and not much wind. ..  even then I feel like I'm hurting my scope.


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#8 gwd

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 06:14 PM

In New Mexico, pinyon  pines shed clouds of pollen.  Spring wind blew dust s around too.    The photo lens brush seemed to work.

 

  Now  in the ROK  we get this fine yellow dust from the Gobi, along with other pollutants.  The common constituent that reaches hazardous levels is what they call pm 2.5, fine particles that can pass into your bloodstream.   The dust adheres to everything and is difficult to remove.  Water seems to make it stickyier.  It doesn't come off the car with just a spray from the hose, I need to scrub and wipe.  When the dust is thickest, viewing conditions are bad too.    The weather report often says "Sunny 0% cloud cover" but the sky will be a light grey, not blue.  I left my scopes at home in storage.  I don't notice much dirt on the binocular lenses but the focus knob on my most used Astro binoculars has become sticky.   In this environment the pine pollen is noticeable but just part of the mix.  



#9 GeneT

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 07:11 PM

You raised an important point. When I was viewing, I did cut back some to avoid the pollen issues you raised. If you do find pollen on your lenses, remove it immediately. The longer it sits on lenses the more the sticky on the pollen will adhere to the surface, and the harder it will be to remove. When cleaning lenses, be a little more careful because you could smear the pollen around and not remove it completely. Pollen is different than dust. Many times, a lens brush will not remove it. Use a small vacuum to remove pollen from the insides and outsides of your telescope. (However, do not vacuum your lenses.)    


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#10 cookjaiii

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 09:02 AM

Pollen season is time for the inexpensive and easily replaced.  My ST-80 gets a lot of sky time in the spring.


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#11 therealdmt

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 09:57 AM

You raised an important point. When I was viewing, I did cut back some to avoid the pollen issues you raised. If you do find pollen on your lenses, remove it immediately. The longer it sits on lenses the more the sticky on the pollen will adhere to the surface, and the harder it will be to remove. When cleaning lenses, be a little more careful because you could smear the pollen around and not remove it completely. Pollen is different than dust. Many times, a lens brush will not remove it. Use a small vacuum to remove pollen from the insides and outsides of your telescope. (However, do not vacuum your lenses.)    

How do you remove it from lenses, and what steps should one take to be careful?
(This will be my first spring season coming up here, so I don’t know)



#12 RussL

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 10:25 AM

I'm not planning on observing at all until the pollen is gone. I've cleaned it off before and never ever want to go through that again. It was frightening and stressful.
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#13 cookjaiii

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 10:36 AM

I just remembered this product.:  Baader TurboFilm  

 

https://www.highpoin...QIaAof0EALw_wcB

 

It is claimed that it doesn't affect the view, and it would protect your objective lens.


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#14 CarolinaBanker

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 10:41 AM

After all the rain, clouds, bad weather which has troubled many of us for a long time, now we have to protect our lenses on our scopes from the pollen. I do not know about other states, but here in NC the tree pollen is terrible for about 3 weeks, covering up stuff one hour after it has been cleaned.

So for you first time scope owners, I have seen pictures of what pollen will do if it gets on your lenses, especially if it gets damp also, and is not removed properly. I usually do not even attempt to take my scope out during this period, unless it is my small hand held spotter or a quick binocular look. When the pollen gets bad indeed, you may be able to use your scope right after a good rain has washed out the air, but not for long, because it will start right back up.

Here in NC, the pine pollen will get so bad, you can see the yellow dust floating in the air, like a yellow fog, and your sinuses will let you know about it also.

We just got a new table and chair set on the patio, I’ve already started to notice yellow spots from the pollen. Hopefully it won’t affect my lenses, but I’m tempted to buy that Baader TurboFilm.



#15 genelew

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 04:09 PM

I just remembered this product.:  Baader TurboFilm  

 

https://www.highpoin...QIaAof0EALw_wcB

 

It is claimed that it doesn't affect the view, and it would protect your objective lens.

Does anyone know how to apply this so there aren’t any wrinkles? Sounds like a good idea for a Mewlon 


Edited by genelew, 06 March 2021 - 04:10 PM.

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#16 cookjaiii

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 05:32 PM

It's the same film substrate Baader sells for DIY solar filters, but without the solar blocking layer.  For that application, they advise not to stretch it and that the wrinkles don't affect the view.  That advice is more for maintaining the integrity of the solar blocking, I believe.  That said, I wouldn't want any wrinkles in a clear film if I could help it.  

 

Here are the directions for making a solar filter.  https://astrosolar.c...a-or-telescope/  I bet you could make it without too many wrinkles.


Edited by cookjaiii, 06 March 2021 - 06:52 PM.

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#17 Rutilus

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 05:09 AM

During the last couple of weeks, my problem has been sand from the Sahara desert, which is a good

4,000 miles from my site. Collected some samples from my equipment for inspection under the microscope.

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • S-Dust.jpg


#18 REC

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 03:59 PM

Yeah, I'm here in NC too and that season is coming soon. Not much yet, but I did notice some buds starting to come out on some of my trees. I hate this season and have to rely on a small refractor and put a long dew shield on them. Like you said, go out after a good rain washes it out, but only last a day or two.


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#19 Stacyjo1962

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 06:29 PM

After all the rain, clouds, bad weather which has troubled many of us for a long time, now we have to protect our lenses on our scopes from the pollen. I do not know about other states, but here in NC the tree pollen is terrible for about 3 weeks, covering up stuff one hour after it has been cleaned.

So for you first time scope owners, I have seen pictures of what pollen will do if it gets on your lenses, especially if it gets damp also, and is not removed properly. I usually do not even attempt to take my scope out during this period, unless it is my small hand held spotter or a quick binocular look. When the pollen gets bad indeed, you may be able to use your scope right after a good rain has washed out the air, but not for long, because it will start right back up.

Here in NC, the pine pollen will get so bad, you can see the yellow dust floating in the air, like a yellow fog, and your sinuses will let you know about it also.

Local, organic honey, taken 2x day has helped me for years with pollen allergies.  Now that I'm in Texas, different pollen...I've got my local, organic honey ready to go!


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#20 scotsman328i

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 06:31 PM

Local, organic honey, taken 2x day has helped me for years with pollen allergies.  Now that I'm in Texas, different pollen...I've got my local, organic honey ready to go!

That’s actually a great idea! Didn’t even think of that! There might be a degree of immunization to eating local honey made of local pollen. Thanks so much! How genius! bow.gif


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#21 payner

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 07:52 PM

Yep, local honey is good for the allergies and good for you! I put on oatmeal, etc each day.


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#22 charlesgeiger

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 08:41 PM

One alternative might be to use a hair dryer (set on no or low heat) to blow away the pollen after each use.  Of course you would do this operation inside in clean air.  Maybe start with a fine brush.  I would only use a brush as a last resort.

Charlie

PS.  Getting the Baader Turbo Film to lay 'without stress or wrinkles' would be impossible in my humble opinion.  But any of the film type filters you purchase do have wrinkles so I don't think that matters on the wave front as the film is so thin.  YMMV

Charlie


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#23 Stacyjo1962

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Posted 11 March 2021 - 10:09 PM

That’s actually a great idea! Didn’t even think of that! There might be a degree of immunization to eating local honey made of local pollen. Thanks so much! How genius! bow.gif

Not to hijack the thread but yes, there is a degree of allergenic immunization when taking local, organic honey.  A neighbor of mine, a nurse, when I first moved to California and allergies were beyond full swing, suggested that I do this - within a week, I was clear of the very red eyes, the hack, the phlegm, DA SNEEZING with projectiles and the skin rashes.  Your body produces histamines in response to material that your body is not used to...hence the symptoms and in my case, all of the above.  The ideal is to "teach" your body/immune system that these new substances (new kinds of pollen) are not harmful. 

 

DISCLAIMER: I am not a medical doctor nor do I portray one on YouTube - this is my personal experience and you are urged to talk to your personal doctor/medical professional about any and all treatments. 

 

Otherwise, taking local, organic honey is a joy, unless you are allergic to honey! Go figure!!!


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#24 alphatripleplus

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Posted 14 March 2021 - 09:12 AM

Pollen season is time for the inexpensive and easily replaced.  My ST-80 gets a lot of sky time in the spring.

Yep, that is what I have done the last few seasons. Funny thing is the ST80 doesn't seem to attract the stuff.lol.gif


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#25 jjbag

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Posted 15 March 2021 - 01:15 PM

Well considering the weather forecast here, no worries about pollen for a while for me

Must Be Midatlantic



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