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Looking for new targets

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#1 mlh25

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 10:54 PM

I have had my 8” Dob for about a month now. I have only had about 5 clear night to use it though. On my my first viewing I saw some mind blowing views of Orion Nebula, the pleiades and Mars in about an hour. Since then I keep going back to those. Are there other equally impressive targets to view this time of year?
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#2 DouglasPaul

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 11:03 PM

https://www.cloudyni...ur-astronomers/



#3 CarolinaBanker

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 11:13 PM

How about the Hyades? Beehive cluster (M44) and Beta Monocerotis?



#4 DouglasPaul

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 11:17 PM

I just wish I could see the sky.


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#5 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 11:35 PM

At this time of year, M34-M38, M41, M44, M46-M48, M67, M81, M82, M103, NGC 457, NGC 752, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 1528, NGC 2158, NGC 2169, NGC 2244, NGC 2261, NGC 2264, NGC 2392, NGC 2683, NGC 2903, NGC 3115, and NGC 3242 are some other possible targets, depending upon time of night and sky darkness.


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#6 Dave_L

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 11:38 PM

We were just talking about this a few nights ago! See this string: https://www.cloudyni...ewing-in-march/

 

Telescopium.com and the Sky Safari app are helpful for this. Clear skies.



#7 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 02:35 AM

If you observed into the wee hours, mlh25, the gamut of spring galaxies will be well-placed, including M51, M63-M66, M84-M87, M100, M104, M106, NGC 3628, NGC 4244, NGC 4414, NGC 4565, NGC 4631, and many more.  

 

M3 and M5 are two excellent spring globular clusters.


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#8 chrysalis

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 04:27 AM

Use these websites:

 

https://tonightssky.com/MainPage.php

 

http://www.virtualcolony.com/sac/



#9 radiofm74

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 05:26 AM

Plenty of stuff!

Yesterday night I went looking for the Beehive and enjoyed it a lot.

Even from light-polluted Milano with a 6" Newton I could glimpse the Eskimo Nebula with averted sight … not impressive but fun and I'm sure that your 8" will do better. 

If you don't have big obstructions to the South, there's a lot to see still ion Orion, Monoceros, Canis Major… I particularly recommend M46 and M47 and second Beta Monocerotis.

If you are up early and have a clear view to the East/SE, it's an interesting time to catch a glimpse of Mercury (greatest WE elongation was a couple days ago). Added bonus if you do it now: Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon are right nearby. This morning I got up at 5.45 to see all that and was rewarded with… un-forecast clouds! Grrrr… but I could still catch a glimpse of Saturn's rings to start my week…

 

Anyway, before someone else does this, I'll point you to two amazing resources that will serve you well all year, for years:

-- https://tonyflanders...essier-project/   A fully reasoned guide by one of our most respected members, broken down by periods of the year. All rather easy and impressive object from what I could see. 

-- Consolmagno/Davies "Turn Left at Orion". Get it now – it will serve you well

 

Clear skies!


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#10 Tony Flanders

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 06:13 AM

I have had my 8” Dob for about a month now. I have only had about 5 clear night to use it though. On my my first viewing I saw some mind blowing views of Orion Nebula, the pleiades and Mars in about an hour. Since then I keep going back to those. Are there other equally impressive targets to view this time of year?


The simple literal answer to your question is no. The Orion Nebula is by far the most spectacular nebula visible from mid-northern latitudes; nothing else even comes close. (In the far-southern sky, the Eta Carinae Nebula is arguably even more spectacular.) The next-best nebulae visible from mid-northern latitudes are M17 and M8 -- very different from each other and from M42! -- but they won't be well placed in the evening sky for several months now.

 

As for star clusters, the Pleiades is the only cluster bright enough to look truly impressive even to the unaided eye. But through an 8-inch Dob almost all the seasonal Messier clusters are really quite grand.


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#11 JohnnyBGood

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 08:59 AM

My most used telescope accessory: the book Turn Left At Orion. Walks you through how to find hundreds of interesting things to see and gives you an idea of what to expect the object to look like in the eyepiece. All editions give eyepiece views for 3" refractors, but the 4th and 5th editions also include images of what to expect an object to look like in a 8" reflector.


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#12 rhetfield

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 09:02 AM

How about the Hyades? Beehive cluster (M44) and Beta Monocerotis?

Hyades is more of a binocular target than an 8" dob target.

 

The big issue for the OP will be how much light pollution he has.  Any significant amount of light pollution and he will not see much in the way of galaxies or nebula.  

 

I look at the "best of" in the Sky Safari and Skye apps.  Sometimes I will just look at the Sky Safari tablet display and point at whatever looks interesting.  I have a lot of light pollution and a smaller scope so am very limited on what can actually be seen.

 

I put degree circles on my mini-dob so I can have an easier time finding things.

https://www.cloudyni...degree-circles/

 

Once you get proficient, there are a number of smaller clusters that look spectacular when you get some decent magnification on them.  Again, dark skies help.


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#13 GGK

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 11:13 AM

@mlh25 - I have a C8 SCT so we have the same light gathering capability if the skies are equal. Last week I opened the topic "What "wow" DSOs do you show the neighbors?" and received excellent recommendations.  I don't know how to give a link to that thread, but it's under the Observing>Deep Sky Observing forum and I've copied in a summary of objects the recommended objects below.  It's a mix of objects which will help you learn what you like to view.  I haven't looked at them all yet, but the ones I viewed have been spectacular. Also, go to the CloudyNights Forum>Observing>Deep Sky Observing and select the "Best Of" Deep Sky Observing Forum" topic pinned at the top and look for the 500 Best DSOs list.  I found it and others like the Messier list and 200 Best Double Star list the most helpful in figuring out that to look at. Have fun.

 

Almach double star

Beta Mon triple star
Betelgeuse colorful star

R Leporis carbon star

H3945 Double Star in CMa Winter Albireo

Iota Cancri double star

 

NGC 457 Owl OC

NGC 869/884 Double Cluster

NGC 2362 OC with Tau CMa

NGC 2392 Eskimo Neb

NGC 2477 OC

NGC 2683 Gxy 25 million LY away

M3 GC

M13 GC

M17 Omega or Swan neb

M35 OC with NGC 2158 in same view

M36 OC

M37 OC

M38 OC and NGC 1907 in same view

M41 OC
M44 OC

M45 Pleiades

M46 using UHC to highlight PN NGC 2438 within M46

M47 OC

M53 GC

M57 Ring Neb

M81 & M82 galaxies

 

Messiers in general

GCs and tight OCs show well

Make sure friends understand how far away galaxies actually are and what to expect to see


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#14 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 01:40 PM

The following binary and carbon star and DSO lists should keep an observer busy for quite some time.

https://www.messier-...er-object-list/ (the Messier Catalogue)

 

http://messier.seds....r/sac110bn.html (the SAC's best objects in the NGC list)

 

http://messier.seds....r/rasc-ngc.html (the RASC's finest NGC objects list)

 

http://www.tyler.net...pot/saa100.html (the sci.astro.amateur 100)

 

http://www.taas.org/...00/taas200.html (the TAAS 200)

 

https://www.astrolea...00/h400lstn.pdf (the Astronomical League's Herschel 400)

 

http://www.stpeteast...ces/thelist.pdf (Vic Menard's list of 400 objects)

 

https://www.cloudyni...-best-dso-list/ (Don Pensack's 500 Best Deep Sky Objects List)

 

http://www.raycash.org/dm600.htm (the Orion Deep Map 600)

 

http://www.clarkvisi...appendix-e.html (Roger Clark's catalog of 611 deep-sky objects)

 

http://messier.seds....lar/BElistA.txt (the Boyd Edwards list of 884 objects)

 

http://messier.seds....milar/m1000.txt (the Magnificent 1000 by Tom Hoffelder)

 

http://www.astroleag...r/dblstar2.html (binary stars)

 

http://www.skyandtel...h/double-stars/ (binary stars)

 

http://users.compaqn...9fT0AWh8#a00150 (binary stars)

 

http://www.billboubl...wds_table1.html (binary stars)

 

http://www.skyandtel...-red1203201401/ (carbon stars)

 

https://www.theposta...ganic-existence (carbon stars)

 

http://www.astrosurf...iar2/carbon.htm (carbon stars)

 

http://www.nckas.org/carbonstars/ (carbon stars)

 

https://www.go-astro...arbon-stars.php (carbon stars)

 

https://www.astrolea...bonStarLog3.pdf (carbon stars)

 

https://sites.google...me/carbon-stars (carbon stars)



#15 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 02:47 PM

The Turn Left at Orion object lists can be found at https://www.cambridg...s_january-march



#16 DSOGabe

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 03:07 PM

If you have a good star chart, it should show several open star clusters around Orion, Monoceros and Canis Major. Some are dim but still within the reach of an 8" scope



#17 sevenofnine

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 06:44 PM

"The Messier Observer's Planisphere" keeps you in touch with what's happening in the night sky. Lots of information front and back. So nicely done that I hang it on the wall above my scope. Highly recommended waytogo.gif



#18 icomet

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 11:56 PM

Saturn's moon, Pan.

 

It's the one that creates the "Encke Gap".   lol.gif

 

Clear Skies.



#19 mlh25

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 10:40 PM

Wow, thanks for all the suggestions. I’ll have to review all this and set me a plan for my next clear night. Once again CN delivers and does not disappoint.

Thanks again
And clear skies

#20 SirLoyne

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Posted 10 March 2021 - 04:37 AM

Go to In The Sky and put in your location. It will tell you what you can see that night.

 

https://in-the-sky.org/index.php



#21 gonzogazi

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Posted 10 March 2021 - 09:24 AM

Hyades is more of a binocular target than an 8" dob target.

 

The big issue for the OP will be how much light pollution he has.  Any significant amount of light pollution and he will not see much in the way of galaxies or nebula.  

 

I look at the "best of" in the Sky Safari and Skye apps.  Sometimes I will just look at the Sky Safari tablet display and point at whatever looks interesting.  I have a lot of light pollution and a smaller scope so am very limited on what can actually be seen.

 

I put degree circles on my mini-dob so I can have an easier time finding things.

https://www.cloudyni...degree-circles/

 

Once you get proficient, there are a number of smaller clusters that look spectacular when you get some decent magnification on them.  Again, dark skies help.

@rhetfield - I'm also in new to this (AD8) and am in the Chicago burbs (right next to O'Hare). I know light pollution here is awful, but I cannot find much. M42 is great, but I'm having a harder time with DSOs. Are you able to see much in this light polluted wasteland (lol)?




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